1950s

1953

Dominick M. Cabriele, St. Petersburg, Florida, loves hearing about Kenyon life from his freshman granddaughter: "Most of us wouldn’t recognize the place today." He also reminds classmates of the upcoming 65th reunion next year: "Hope to see many of you there and lie about what we did at Kenyon. Lying is in today!"

1953

Since 2001, James E. Klosterman has wintered in Tucson, Arizona, at Voyager RV Resort and is now back in Siloam Springs, Arkansas.

1953

Sheppard B. Kominars, San Francisco, is writing his autobiography and doing public poetry readings.

1953

F. Frank LeFever, New York City, organized a conference on brain health last spring.

1953

Joseph A. Rotolo, Bonita Springs, Florida, writes: "I hit age 86 and have decided to hit back by taking up bungee jumping, skydiving and snow-boarding. I’ll let you know what hospital I’ll be in."

1953

At a small antiques show, Arthur W. "Bill" Sprague Jr., La Grange, Illinois, discovered something a dealer had unearthed in Milwaukee: "boxes of dusty, dirty patent files. My eyes were drawn immediately to a 1950 detailed scale 16" x 12" drawing of a goalie’s lacrosse stick — exactly like the real stick Bill Stiles put in my hands in 1950! I still cannot calm down thinking about the good old days and people at Kenyon."

1954

John T. Seaman Jr. and wife Barbara summer in Barrington, Illinois, and "winter at the casita in Arizona. We stay busy marveling at the energy level of the Class of '54 and trying to keep the Fitbits satisfied."

1954

David Y. Smith, Thousand Oaks, California, having sold his house, is happy in an apartment but misses his garage. Although he gave away many tools in the move, he still looks forward to changing the fluids in his 232,000-mile 2000 Maxima.

1955

Stephen Fedele, Battle Creek, Michigan, no longer travels internationally since his wife’s passing, but manages 12 hours a week at the office caring for some remaining patients at an extended-care facility — "nothing fancy, just a lot of diagnostic challenges."

1955

John F. Gans, enjoying retirement with his wife, Kathi, in Buckeye, Arizona, reports: "I completed my chemotherapy for lymphoma in September 2015 and now, three PET scans later, am in remission and cancer-free. Life is good!"

1955

William C. Humphrey, Negaunee, Michigan, writes: "Been playing duplicate bridge and doing OK. My partner and I got a 73 percent on Friday (I had to brag to someone)."

1955

Arthur L. Johnson, Potsdam, New York, is directing three dinner mysteries and giving two history lectures for the retiree program at SUNY Potsdam.

1956

Philip R. Currier informs that he and Jane remain in good health and enjoy living in Durham, North Carolina. He plans to move into an independent-living facility this year.

1956

Arthur M. Goldberg, Tucson, Arizona, enjoys exercising by doing home gardening and landscaping, plus helping a friend clean swimming pools. Art enjoys reading books, spending time with family and traveling locally.

1956

E. Christian Schoenleb joined the board of directors of the Phoenix Rescue mission, a ministry for the homeless.

1956

W. Stanley Walch and his wife, Valerie, now live in Boca Grande, Florida, but still spend time back in St. Louis or traveling. At age 83, Stan still practices law.

1957

William R. Abbott, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada, is reading Cicero in Latin and collaborating with colleagues on a business ethics text. Philosophy seems to attract fewer students, he notes, many of whom come to the field through business ethics courses.

1957

R. Bradley Bennett, Binghamton, New York, flew to a village in France’s Champagne region to attend a 600-guest wedding and lavish reception for 350 people.

1957

Daniel B. Bumstead, Naples, Florida, has ended his 20-year service on the board of the Naples Council on World Affairs but will continue working on its scholarship program for high-schoolers. "March in Florida always attracts strange characters," he writes, "such as Donald A. Fischman '57, the Rev. Richard L. Fenn '57 and the Rev. Albert N. Halverstadt Jr. '57. Always fun to cluck about the old times when smartphones and laptops didn’t exist and we had all the answers anyhow."

1957

I. Kelman Cohen, Richmond, Virginia, still enjoys family, "a surfeit of ex-patients, students and a continued inventing of products, of which the latest is to try to protect tissue from radiation damage. Like the lady of Amherst, I am too busy to die at 82."

1957

Eben G. Crawford, Albuquerque, New Mexico, "is, sad to say, too darn old for nefarious doings," but enjoys life in the slow lane as a student at the University of New Mexico, studying human evolution this semester.

1957

The Rev. Albert N. Halverstadt Jr., Denver, writes that, until his retirement from St. Barnabas Parish in 2000, he presided over the marriage of 13 same-sex couples from 1993 on, "with the permission of my bishop. The journey of getting his permission almost got me defrocked and unemployed, but we got it worked out."

1957

James D. Morgan teaches two seminars at NYU and has engaged in a new architectural project: He’s developed a proposal to double the subway platform space at the Grand Central 4/5/6 station with no shutdown during construction. "Now I’m trying to get the NYC Transit Authority to tell me why it can’t be built (I mean technically)," he writes.

1957

Henry J. Steck, Homer, New York, writes that the "happy retirement plans Janet and I had were not to be. In late August, Janet lost her courageous 2 1/2-year battle with cancer. We met 62 years ago on a wonderful fall day on the Fall Dance Weekend of 1954. My deep thanks and appreciation to those who heard of her passing and called or wrote."

1958

Dean Burgess, Portsmouth, Virginia, guides tours in its Olde Towne, "the largest collection of historic houses between Alexandria and Charleston on the Atlantic Coast."

1958

Sheldon M. Fisher will host a mini-reunion in Denver to hear about a trip to the Holy Land by Joseph M. Topor Jr. '58 and his wife, Carolyn. His 121-member senior hiking group includes Richard E. Passoth ’65 and R. Michael Bundgaard ’65. "Occasionally we three are known to sing Kenyon songs along the trails," he adds.

1958

William R. Morrow, Fort Myers, Florida, finished teaching an adult education class at Florida Gulf Coast University on the subject of facing mortality. "On the more lively side," he writes, "I regularly perform as a musician and caller for our local contra dance group."

1958

Dale A. Neuman writes that, after 17 years part-time at the University of Missouri–Kansas City, he will "hang it up for good — and no longer buy a parking permit" this fall.

1959

Roger C. Smith and his wife, Sybil Marie, enjoy lakeshore life in southwestern Virginia. They celebrated their 50th anniversary with a family vacation on Cape Cod.

1959

Stephen Wachtel, Memphis, Tennessee, still playing music with Elmo and the Shades, reports that in 2015 the band lost trumpeter Ben Cauley, the sole survivor of the crash that killed Otis Redding. "But we still have Hubert Crawford, James Brown’s drummer. Believe it, I’m the baby in this group."

1959

Joseph "Jeff" Levy, New Richmond, Wisconsin, reports: "If the sun comes up and the crick don’t rise, I’ll have my 80th next month."

1959

Fred C. Mench still teaches Latin part-time at Middle Tennessee State University while his wife, Mary, manages their 1880-vintage Grandma’s House Bed and Breakfast in Smyrna, Tennessee.

1959

Robert J. Mulholland spent a week with John B. Templeton Jr. at the Indian Wells tennis tournament, and they played golf at Bob’s club in Rancho Santa Fe, California; John returned to 30-degree weather in Chicago.

1959

Arnold Ostrow is still actively enjoying the southern California lifestyle in Huntington Beach. Arnie continues to participate in the UC-Irvine Medical School chest clinic, supervising pulmonary fellows.

1959

Lawrence H. Selman sold his gallery of art glass and antique and contemporary paperweights to "a nice family in Chicago," he reports. "The gallery is now located on Michigan Avenue across from the Art Institute and still carries my name: L.H. Selman, Ltd." Meanwhile, Larry and his wife, Marti, live part-time in the desert outside Bisbee, Arizona. "I have resumed playing the treble viola da gamba after 30 years of not playing."

1960s

1960

David C. Canfield, Hackettstown, New Jersey, a full-time professor at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, also teaches third-year medical students at two medical centers in New Jersey.

1960

Melvin J. Chavinson retired after 43 years of practicing child, adolescent and adult psychiatry in the Cleveland area. "I plan to play it by ear regarding how to spend my extra time."

1960

James D. Cox, now professor emeritus of radiation oncology at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, writes: “I still come into the hospital on a regular basis to participate in clinical research and advise junior faculty and residents.”

1960

Edwin H. Eaton Jr., Bonita Springs, Florida, reports: “Tickie and I sold our house in Cincinnati last year, and we are now full-time Florida residents at our Barefoot Beach home. Life is a lot simpler with only one house, and Florida summers are not as bad as advertised.”

1960

The Rev. David O. McCoy, Athens, Ohio, attended the graduation of granddaughter Caitelin F.K. McCoy ’17 with her father — and his son — Stephen H. McCoy ’87. “Just trying to keep going — working out at the gym five days a week.”

1960

William S. Reed and wife Bev split time between Boston and Grantham, New Hampshire. “I continue to serve as chair of the Davis Educational Foundation. The work keeps my mind active and involved with higher-education issues.”

1960

Merrill A. Ritter, Indianapolis, retired from doing orthopedic surgery, writes: “I spend most of my time now building furniture, chain saw carving such crazy objects as bears, eagles and Easter Island heads. I came back to Kenyon for Tom Edwards’ memorial. He was one of four men who made a difference in my life. What great things he did for us.”

1960

Daniel O. Holland published his fifth novel, “Tomorrow Will Come,” on Kindle and was the featured poet at an Original Voice poetry event in Coloma, Wisconsin. Two of his poems, put to music by a UW-Stevens Point music professor, were sung by the 40-member women’s choir.

1961

David C. Brown, Louisville, Kentucky, reports that he and his wife, Barbara, spent two weeks in Japan in May and, after that, planned “to settle down in Louisville with a few short trips along the way.”

1961

Timothy Fuller is in his 51st year at Colorado College, still teaching full-time and pursuing his scholarly interests.

1961

David E. Lenz and his wife, Betty, spent five days in Chiclayo, Peru, north of Lima, where they visited 4th- to 11th-century ruins. David made several presentations at the university there.

1961

Alan Mendelson retired “a second time” from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In addition to his book, “Exiles from Nowhere: The Jews and the Canadian Elite,” he edited two books “written by his beloved philosophy professor at Kenyon, Virgil C. Aldrich,” he reports.

1961

Kurt E. Yeager, Aptos, California, stays active as the former president of the national Electric Power Research Institute with a number of article-writing and speaking invitations.

1961

Michael S. Kischner and his wife, Beret, recently organized an effort to help furnish the basement apartment of their Seattle neighbor to accommodate a young family from Syria that is caring for a newborn and awaiting its asylum interview. They were accompanied on their previous trip back to Kenyon by infant son Gerrit; for their upcoming visit, Gerrit sends his personal greetings to Swarthmore classmate President Sean Decatur.

1962

Charles E. Albers, Sarasota, Florida, is program director of the local economics club. He and Julie have planned a trip through northern Italy in September.

1962

John F. Binder lives “at the end of a long canyon road high above Los Angeles” with his wife, Jeanne Field. He still works in Hollywood on the occasional short film.

1962

George Brownstone teaches psychotherapy and psychoanalysis in Vienna, Austria, and elsewhere in Europe. “I’ve been lucky with my health,” he reports, “my various age-appropriate ills all so far turning out to be no more than flesh wounds.”

1962

Peter H. Glaubitz, Eagles Mere, Pennsylvania, returned from a monthlong expedition to Antarctica on a Shackleton Centenary Expedition voyage supported by the famed explorer’s granddaughter.

1962

Richard A. Rubin, Mill Valley, California, chairs the board of governors of the California Commonwealth Club, the oldest, largest, longest continuously functioning public affairs forum in the nation. In this position, he recently met with New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman.

1962

William P. Russell, St. Charles, Illinois, still works at age 76 as a financial planner: “As they used to say in the westerns of old,” he writes, “‘I’ll die with my boots on.’”

1963

Col. Lester D. Alford, Bend, Oregon, reports he “spent a most enjoyable 24 years in the U.S. Air Force flying the F-4 Phantom,” though it cost him his hearing. Last year, Les had a cochlear implant. “Unfortunately,” he adds, “I can now clearly hear ‘Take out the garbage!’”

1963

Calvin S. Frost, still working at age 77, travels often to Copenhagen, Kenya and South Africa for his company, Channeled Resources.

1963

Raymond P. Gouin, Melrose, Massachusetts, celebrated his 50th year as an attorney last November, recalling his having placed first among the 597 who took the state bar exam by achieving the highest known score in its recorded history.

1963

Goran T. Hemberg is “into storytelling more than ever.” Working with a Swedish folksinger, he has been investigating one of the oldest tales about the Nordic gods, “Voluspá.” He works with Fabula Storytelling, a company that “sets up a scene for life stories told by ordinary people.” Enabling those unfamiliar with the stage to deliver true stories to large audiences with nerve and sincerity — “that makes me feel very, very much alive,” he writes.

1963

James P. Keyes, Columbus, Ohio, volunteers with She Has a Name, a social service agency designed to assist victims of human trafficking reconnect with their dignity. He sings with the Victory Chorus, a group of cancer survivors, and wrote “The Talkin’ Prostate Cancer Blues” after finishing radiation treatment.

1963

Robert W. Macdonald Jr. has, since retirement, been providing career counseling for senior executives looking for a new position.

1963

Theodore L. Walch, Studio City, California, teaches full-time and directs plays at the Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles, while researching Truffaut and the French New Wave in Paris during summers.

1964

James W. Atkinson, North Street, Michigan, in his post-retirement career as an artist, had an exhibition in April at the Brown Family Environmental Center titled “Aesthetic Zoology: Finding Beauty in Aquatic Invertebrates.”

1964

Thomas C. Bond, Belmont, Massachusetts, is in private psychiatric practice and teaching in a family medicine residency. With his wife, Vicki, he traveled to Southeast Asia, “which was terrific and surprising,” Tom reports. “A different Vietnam than the one we remember from graduation.”

1964

John M. Capron divides his time between Georgia and North Carolina, enjoying retirement by railing about political correctness and inoffensive speech on college campuses.

1964

John B. Hattendorf, Newport, Rhode Island, gives presentations on his lifelong passion for maritime history and strategy. His new volume is “To the Java Sea: The Diary, Reports and Letters of Henry Eccles, 1940–1942.”

1964

Richard F. Levitt, who retired from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in 2013, still donates time to work with fellows and residents there and stays healthy through swimming regularly.

1964

Edwin L. McCampbell is a primary-care physician in the Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, area. He was chosen as the medical director of Amedisys Hospice.

1964

Richard D. Richardson and his wife went on a five-week-long Airstream caravan with 25 others in April to trace Civil War activity along the Mississippi River.

1964

David A. Schmid, who splits his time between Bonita Springs, Florida, and Massachusetts, had a visit from John J. Camper '64 and his wife after their return from a trip to Cuba.

1964

Jeffrey W. Way, New York City, finished full-time teaching at the Fashion Institute of Technology. His artwork has been included in shows, and he keeps in touch with Charles H. Lynch III, David Diao, Lawrence D. Schulz and Peter Scarlet.

1965

David F. Banks writes from London, England: “My news is that I have worked as co-chair in a very high-profile dance program, Project Polunin, that opened at Sadler’s Wells in March. The work has been intense.”

1965

Edward G. Heimerdinger, Brevard, North Carolina, visited Gambier last spring and was particularly impressed with senior work on display in the Gund Gallery.

1965

Gary E. Kaltenbach, Fremont, Ohio, and his family spent Christmas in Japan with their son, Brian, a search-and-rescue swimmer in the Navy.

1965

John S. Kerr, Southport, North Carolina, writes: “Because my total laryngopharyngectomy precluded our planned 50th wedding anniversary cruise, we took a belated Viking ocean cruise beginning in Venice and ending in Barcelona.” A March trip to the West Coast to visit family and friends included calamari steaks with roommate Timothy F. Isaacs '65. John has enjoyed digitizing his old slides of British Columbia mountain climbing and his year in Vietnam: “Great to see old photos of my first roommate David F. Banks '65, who was part of our Alaska adventure in 1961.”

1965

Isaac M. Kikawada, Mountain View, California, turned 80 in April. “Becoming more and more passive,” he writes, “but I still enjoy the heavenly beauties that visit us in our backyard — Mars, Venus, and Jupiter.”

1965

Robert A. Legg, Greensboro, Georgia, and his wife, Janie, enjoy three cruises a year, the most recent from Singapore to Hong Kong with ports of call in Thailand, Vietnam and China. “Sorry to have missed the Bob Harrison induction, but roomie John A. Lynn '65 and Joseph W. Adkins III ’63 passed along many highlights.”

1965

N. Stevens Newcomer, Greer, South Carolina, finished shoulder replacement rehab and plans this fall to meet other frat brothers, including Theodore “Ted” Walch ’63. Steve adds: “David A. Schmid '65 and I hope to meet in Florida to see Coach Harrison. Bev and I have a trip planned to Portugal early fall.”

1965

Richard E. Passoth retired from his family therapist practice and now chairs the Water Resources Committee of the Colorado Sierra Club.

1965

Richard I. Peters, Wixom, Michigan, retired from active ministry in the Presbyterian Church in 2009 but still does occasional preaching engagements when asked or needed. Rick stays active with condo remodeling, camping, traveling, woodworking projects and especially photography.

1965

Sylvan Seidenman, Miami, writes: “As a guidance counselor at New World School of Arts I had a student named Tarell McCraney. He is black, gay, had a crack-addicted mother ill from HIV and lived in a tough Miami neighborhood called Liberty City. If this all sounds vaguely familiar, you saw or heard about the Oscar-winning movie ‘Moonlight,’ written mostly by him and based largely on his years growing up. My wife and I are proud that along the way he adopted us as his ‘godparents.’ This coming June he officially takes over as director of Yale’s prestigious playwriting program.”

1966

Frank B. “Burt” Dibble, Rye, New Hampshire, reports: “After retiring from the V.A., I have found new life in medicine as a medical director with Compassus Hospice — because I love it! We are very active in Rotary and civic affairs, Mae on the Rye Budget Committee and Heritage Commission, and I on the Zoning Board of Adjustment. We have a 23-foot runabout to visit the coastal islands and towns and are still flying.”

1966

Harvey Fernbach, Bethesda, Maryland, practices psychiatry three days a week with the other days “devoted to the pursuit of social justice, peace and a sustainable world,” he reports.

1966

Lowell S. Gaspar, San Diego, and his wife, Judy, cruised last fall from Haifa to Rome after four days in Israel. “We visited Cyprus, several Greek islands and Malta, where I united with my newly found stepsiblings from England and Malta — long story; many tears had by all.”

1966

Ken S. Honbo writes: “After medical school at Pitt, I was in the Army for four years at Fort Dix and then Fort Sam Houston, followed by an endocrine fellowship at UCLA. We decided to stay and now live in Tarzana, California, which is close to my office in Encino, where I continue to work part-time. Our two sons and their families are 40 minutes away, and we see our three granddaughters often. Nancy and I have been married 49 years.”

1966

Carl S. Mankowitz, New York City, reports that he bought a custom bicycle about four years ago. “Doing long rides to keep in shape. Aiming for a 50-mile ride on the Jersey shore in May.”

1966

Louis H. Martone, Pittsburgh, sold his dermatology practice to a corporation that has been buying them around the country, so he will be officially out by the end of the year. “Now,” he adds, “I will have plenty of time for fun and games.”

1966

Richard T. Nolan advises: “Those of us who live near Yellowstone National Park know that late fall and winter are the best times to visit. The crowds of summer are gone, the animals are easier to see against the snow, and the only way to get to most places in the park is by tracked snow coach. We hit the park four times this year.”

1966

Denis B. Pierce, Evanston, Illinois, combined his law firm with one based in Atlanta after 42 years so he can retire from active management and act as a consultant. As president of the family foundation he established nine years ago, his team deals with the housing and homelessness problems of Chicago.

1966

Gerald E. Reynolds and his wife, Claudia, celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on Kauai and the Big Island in December — “a truly wonderful Hawaii Five-O!” In Fairfax, Virginia, he teaches two courses for the director of national intelligence and as an adjunct at George Mason University.

1966

Peter A. White divides his time between homes in Gambier and north central Montana, reporting: “In January Richard L. Ray ’65 and I spent the better part of a week on the remote island of Bastimentos, Panama, as guests of David C. Thomas ’65 in his beach home, where the views were magnificent and the conversation … about the same as in ’65.”

1966

Nicholas Zakov, Auburn Township, Ohio, traveled to South America and Antarctica with his brother, Kamen N. Zakov ’67. “As president of the Pasteur Club, a century-old organization of physicians in Cleveland,” Nick informs, “I welcomed President Sean Decatur in February and Fred Kluge in April.”

1967

Stephen W. Carmichael, Rochester, Minnesota, traveled to Peru with his wife, Susan Stoddard — a week at Machu Picchu and another aboard a boat on the upper Amazon.

1967

Phil Cerny, York, England, has been practicing the (guitar-shaped) bouzouki, spending a weekend at an East Yorkshire folk festival and attending international trade seminars and roundtables to parse out the Brexit consequences with old friends and colleagues.

1967

Roger L. Reynolds approaches his 25th year on the bench as a federal administrative law judge in Lexington, Kentucky. He explains: “I am routinely asked if I am planning on retirement any time soon, but I really don’t know what I would do with myself if I did. Not that good a golfer.”

1967

William E. Seymour III writes: “I have retired to a life of sloth punctuated by a few efforts at voluntarism and car racing. I’m living in a woodsy suburb of Boston with Rosemary Driscoll (nice wife), Turbo (nice dog) and Gordo (nice cat). One kid, Nora (also nice), is a hippie in the state of Washington.”

1968

Ronald K. Bliss, Colorado Springs, Colorado, reports: “Further cementing my standing as slowest skier in the family, I earned a bronze medal in February on the NASTAR (NAtional STAndard Race) course at Copper Mountain. Joining me in the gates that day were two friends from Minnesota (one of whom also won a bronze), my wife, Naoko (who won a gold), and our younger daughter, Mari (who won a silver). Medals are awarded on the basis of a handicap system that favors age and treachery over youth and skill. Even so …”

1968

A.F. “Al” Ehrbar, New York City, feels lucky to be here after a diagnosis of stage 3 lung cancer three years ago, adding, “I smile every single day.”

1968

Barry I. Eisenstein, Washington, D.C., writes: “As of Jan. 1, I retired from full-time work at Merck and am now working part-time as a scientific officer of CARB-X, a public-private partnership with BARDA (U.S. Health and Human Services) and the Wellcome Trust, furthering the development of new therapeutics for highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens.” The project allows him to regularly travel from D.C. to Boston, his former hometown.

1968

Michael A. Liff loves being close to family in Portland, Maine, if not the winters. An assistant teacher at LearningWorks, a local literacy nonprofit serving immigrants and refugees, Mike educates “young adults from Angola, DR Congo, Iraq, Dominican Republic, Syria, Paraguay and Djibouti, just to name a few. Great young people trying to start a new life in somewhat difficult and confusing circumstances.”

1968

William M. Northway, Frankfort, Michigan, writes: “As I inch my way toward retirement, I have to admit that I do so begrudgingly. As wonderful friend and brother-in-curiosity Paul H. Rigali Jr. will agree, we fell into perhaps the most gratifying job on the face of the earth. As orthodontists, we provide relief, function and beauty on a regular and fairly predictable basis.” Through a job-shadowing program in Kenyon’s Career Development Office that Bill recommends, he and Austin C. Diehl ’20 “hugely advanced” Bill’s X-ray study. “I hope it helped Austin as much as it did my project,” he notes.

1968

Raymond S. Pfeiffer, Bay City, Michigan, enjoyed an educational monthlong trip to Israel this year touring historic and archaeological sites with Richard L. Shapiro: “Mountain biking five days a week, touring the many wonderful paths in the Elah Valley.”

1969

Kenneth R. Abraham, Dover, Delaware, thanks everyone who contributed to the charity he founded, Citizens for Criminal Justice, which gave away 20 new bicycles and hundreds of other gifts to more than 40 children of parents in re-entry: “It is important,” he writes, “for the families of those in re-entry to know that people care whether Mom or Dad succeeds after release from prison!”

1970s

1970

David P. Adams retired to the San Francisco Bay area and always enjoys visiting Eric P. Allemano '70, who lives in a small town an hour southwest of Paris. Meanwhile, Eric has been hired by an American consulting firm contracted by the U.S. Agency for International Development to lead a team conducting a needs assessment in Djibouti on the teaching of reading in French.

1970

Peter M. Cowan visited William S. Koller Jr. '70 in Naples, Florida, recently and often speaks with the Rev. Karl D. Ruttan '70. "I even got a phone call today from Lawrence H. Witner '69," he adds. "We swimmers stick together for life!"

1970

Douglas M. Fleming and J.D. Pell Osborn '70 had a “great visit” with E. Robert Plunkett '70 in North Andover, Massachusetts. “Thanks to our fellow classmates (led by Paul G. Keiner '70), Bob seems to be comfortable and doing well,” he reports. “Pell hasn’t aged a bit.” Paul will teach social studies one more year at the Beech Hill School and cites the benefits of the area’s “strong group of Kokosingers and other Kenyon friends.” In addition to Bob and Pell, he often sees Eric B. Herr '70, James S. Hecox ’69, Timothy J. Wildman ’68, JeŽrey A. Walker ’74, Jim Nininger and Christopher J. Lane.

1970

After walking 500 miles on the Camino de Santiago from southern France to northwestern Spain, Anthony W. Olbrich plans another walk this fall on the Camino Portuguese, starting in Lisbon and ending in Finisterre on the Spanish coast.

1970

Robert E. Poll, Austin, Texas, and his wife, Laura, remain busy working in Southeast Asia. Bob is a first-time grandfather to Jack, son of his daughter Alexandra O. Poll McConnell '05 and Casey S. McConnell '06, of Washington D.C.

1970

Allen Scarboro reports: "An eventful year in Istanbul. Flew out of the airport the same day it was attacked by terrorists. The government fired all foreign faculty at my university, then a month later all faculty and staff, then shut the university down. I think I am retired."

1970

David Taylor, Bozeman, Montana, works for a Seattle nonprofit called PATH on a project to develop a drug to fight hookworm.

1971

Stephen F. Christy Jr., Chicago, continues work as a landscape architect but retired as executive director of the Lake Forest Open Lands Association. He returns to Kenyon from time to time and enjoys seeing trees he planted in his youth, including a massive white oak in front of Peirce Hall. "Barring any mischief, it should live for several hundred years."

1971

Fletcher R. Dubois remains an active professor emeritus at Heidelberg University in Germany. At a large international conference of the medical psychology department, he ended up singing a song titled "World Round, World Wide" that he wrote some years back for a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.

1971

Thomas H. Hollinger retired in 2015 after 40 years of teaching and administration at independent schools. Tom paints landscapes and nautical scenes, completed a lengthy term as warden of St. John's Episcopal Church, and chairs his local historic district commission.

1971

Alan G. Janos, Evergreen Park, Illinois, will retire in November from his position as principal scientist at the Gas Technology Institute after more than 41 years.

1971

“In October, Fred and I pulled stakes and migrated 1,000 miles south to Florida, of all places. I had lived in D.C. since graduating from medical school, and Fred almost as long, but we both love it.”

Jack Killen

1971

Sante Matteo, Oxford, Ohio, a professor emeritus of Italian at Miami University, is collaborating on a book project with current Kenyon Professor Simone Dubrovic, who will edit the volume, to be published in Italy.

1971

Leslie K. Mikesell retired from Interactive Data Corp. and lives in Mount Prospect, Illinois, with wife Jill, a retired teacher. They enjoy traveling and visiting their sons in Southern California and Milwaukee.

1971

Michael W. Rosenberg, Fort Myers, Florida, retired from the operating room and took up running: two half-marathons in the last three months. He and his wife, Carol, love being grandparents to three grandchildren born in the past 18 months.

1971

Norman E. Schmidt, Cleveland, continues to meet Susan Paley Weaver '73 and John H. Emack '72 for regular lunches to "discuss how much better-looking, smarter, healthier and athletic we are now than we were 45 years ago. We had a visit from Laurie B. Sherwood '73, and Edward J. Moran '71 shows up occasionally as well."

1971

William J. Williams, Laurel, Maryland, retired from government service for the second time — the first from the Air Force after 30 years, this time after 14 years as the chief of the Center for Cryptologic History at the National Security Agency.

1971

“I retired the day before Thanksgiving, loaded up a U-Haul, and was a resident of Boston by December. I am going back to furniture design after leaving it for a career in project management.”

Richard E. Yorde Jr.

1972

Frederick H. "Rick" Alles had lunch with Edward A. Cohen '74 when he was in San Diego and talked wine and music. (Eddie's Twin Cities cover band is called the Strolling Clones.) At a Santa Cruz retreat, Rick reports playing "so much guitar that my calluses started bleeding. David B. Erickson '72 and I are scheming to make a Zeet reunion a part of the reunion. Billy Shields '97 has unwisely said he will join us on drums."

1972

“Still living in Los Angeles. My older son, Trevor, got married last year and they live here as well. The only Kenyon friends I have seen recently are Ellen Simon '74 and, a while ago, Liesel Friedrich '73. Kenyon has become much more popular for kids here, and now it seems like people know all about it — none of the 'Oh, where is that?'”

Kathryn K. Eisenberg Belton

1972

David L. Bergman, Baltimore, recently saw Ross S. Posnock '74, Reed Woodhouse '70 and Myer S. Berlow '72 in New York. Dave retired last May from Towson University, where he was an English professor, and just completed a monthlong program that helps enlarge and steady the movements of those with Parkinson's disease.

1972

Lawrence P. Enright, Barnsboro, New Jersey, published his 12th book, "The Jennifer Project," last June and describes it as "apocalyptic sci-fi told fromt he point of view of artificial intelligence."

1972

J. Christopher Fahlman, newly appointed director of operations and visitor experience at Kenyon's Gund Gallery, reports, "I am delighted to be back on campus, joining a brilliant group of co-workers. In two months I have assisted with three world-class exhibitions and countless indelible experiences with students, faculty, staff and community members."

1972

Diane Markham Lane has shifted her freelance graphic design career to part-time, "allowing for more frequent hiking, travel, choral music, creative pursuits, the company of loved ones and for being an active part of this charming and historic small town of Cedarburg, Wisconsin."

1973

Jack Y. Au, East Northport, New York, returned to the Hill in February for the first Lunar Year Gala sponsored by the Chinese Culture Club. "My heart was warmed," he writes, "not only by the presence of Asian students but by the number of Kenyon students who are studying Mandarin Chinese."

1973

“Both my current museum projects — Thomas Cole's home in Catskill, New York, and Harriet Beecher Stowe's home in Hartford, Connecticut — will be open to the public this spring, after much research and design. Both Cole and Stowe decorated their own interiors, so I'm looking forward to hearing visitors' reactions to the evidence-based décor I've masterminded.”

Jean C. Dunbar

1973

Thomas J. Epps said goodbye to Georgetown after 35 years and bought a "little beach place" to the south in a town of 5,000. "Perhaps a few holiday dinners with roommate and rake William T. "Ted" Wedig '73 proved more enriching than ever," he adds.

1973

Carol E. Eyler, Northfield, Minnesota, retired after 40-plus years as an academic librarian, the last 17 at Carleton College. "Jane and I still hope to relocate to the Gambier area sometime in the next year," she notes.

1973

Pegi Goodman had New Year's brunch in New York City with Murray L. Horwitz '70 and J.D. Pell Osborn '70. That week she and Anne L. Dealy '73 attended Peter Rutkoff's class, "African-American Music and the Great Migration," during the first NYC Kenyon Institute. Next up was joining "400,000-plus like-minded New Yorkers in the Women's March, an awesome experience," she reports.

1973

Maria C. Halton, Baltimore, participated in an artist's residency in Puebla, Mexico, from April 24 to June 5. "I use majolica clay and glazes in my ceramic work," she explains, "and this area is famous for their majolica. They use the clay from under their feet and produce the glaze right there. My project is to create a Wall of Humanity." She'll be looking for venues to exhibit the installation.

1973

Christiana Russo Maxwell and her husband traveled throughout Italy for 18 days in September, part of it including a six-day Porsche driving tour of Tuscany. At home on their farm in Troutville, Virginia, prescribed field burnings to improve bird and plant habitat have been “nerve-racking,” but the calves born to two Black Angus cows have been fun to watch.

1973

Kerry H. Pechter, Emmaus, Pennsylvania, returned from five weeks in Costa Rica, “where I hiked the rainforest, snorkeled the reef, ate many mangoes and interviewed local pension officials about the Costa Rican retirement system for my e-magazine, Retirement Income Journal.”

1973

Jacqueline E. Robbins managed to break both ankles and a leg in Chicago in February on a visit to her son’s family: “Not old age, just carelessness — I missed a step, twisted and landed hard,” she explains. “Of course, 20 years ago I might have caught myself.” Husband John M. Elliott is enjoying his last semester teaching at Kenyon, including a course titled The American Presidency.

1973

Philip R. Roy reports that his company, Playhouse Productions, is organizing national tours of “My Son the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy”; “WaistWatchers: The Musical”; “My Mother’s Italian, My Father’s Jewish & I’m in Therapy” and more. He splits time between Philadelphia and Delray Beach, Florida, when not touring.

1973

Ann Starr, Columbus, Ohio, writes that her Upper Hand Press published its first volume of poetry, “Free Ferry” by Ann Cefola.

1974

“Instead of retiring, I’m getting pickier and pickier about the freelance journalism I take on, and currently write for The Wall Street Journal, CNBC.com and U.S. News & World Report, covering personal finance and investing, the economy and financial markets.”

Jeffrey C. Brown

1974

Carol A. Heiberger, Philadelphia, owner and creator of ExecuSpeak Dictionary, leads a new Wharton graduate alumni group called FoundersOver50 to provide a forum for older entrepreneurs.

1974

Ronald L. Hopping, Friendswood, Texas, reports: “Our optometry practice has grown to five docs with the addition of our son. It has been fun practicing with him and having his family (two granddaughters) move 1 1/2 miles from us. Our other son is also nearby at UT Houston med school. Aside from that, still enjoying fruit and vegetable gardening and searching for the perfect red blend.”

1974

David W. Horvitz, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, writes: “Like most of us from the class of 1974, I recently celebrated my 65th birthday. That signifies what? Medicare and Social Security. An arbitrary number but still symbolic.” David celebrated the day with his wife, Francie, four kids and their spouses, and six grandchildren. The day after? “Woke up feeling just the same as I did the morning before. Then I looked in the mirror. Time does fly!”

1974

“It has been an exciting year here in Chatham, New Jersey. Tribe Pictures, the company I founded, celebrated its 30th year. April 4 was the release of my first book, “Leadership in Focus: Bringing Out Your Best on Camera,” a guide for leaders in the digital age to connect with their tribes using the power of video. And I got to take a father/son road trip with Gibson D. Oakley ’16 as I dropped him off in Orlando to start working at Disney World as a character performer.”

Vern Oakley

1974

Janet A. Bloss Shuff and Ronald F. Shuff, Southlake, Texas, celebrated 40 years of marriage. They have planned a July Baltic cruise whose highlight will be visiting Russia. “I’m presently taking jujitsu and kickboxing lessons,” Janet adds. “My old knees are complaining. However, if I’m ever attacked by anyone slow and weak, he’s a dead man.”

1974

Peter Smagorinsky started working with Mexico’s University of Guadalajara to develop and implement literacy education programs in the state of Jalisco.

1974

“Tracy G. Smith ’72 and I are still in Mount Gilead, Ohio. I can honestly say we now know what being empty-nesters really means. Even though daughter Hannah G.S. Smith ’13 had been living in Cleveland since her graduation, we were only about 1 1/2 hours away. However, Hannah moved to her company’s Minneapolis headquarters last October. We can still stop to see her older sister Sarah in Chicago on the way.”

Kim Stapleton-Smith

1974

Vickery Trinkaus-Randall, Stow, Massachusetts, took on the role of co-director of the M.D./Ph.D. program at Boston University School of Medicine. She will again ride the two-day, 170-mile Pan-Mass bike ride in August raising funds for Dana Farber, noting, “I hold them closely in my heart as they are the only reason my daughter is alive. My goal is to get through unscathed, but it is nothing compared with the gutsiness of my daughter.”

1974

Lucy Brown Vinis was elected mayor of Eugene, Oregon. Running as a progressive candidate in the May primary, she defeated three opponents by taking more than 50 percent of the vote and will serve a four-year term, presiding over an eight-member city council. “I am in almost daily contact,” she notes, “with Gregory S. Rikhoff ’81, who is director of operations for Lane County.”

1974

Sally B. Pittman Wright retired after 20 years in development at her local YMCA, moved out of New York and headed back to the Midwest to undertake a major home renovation in her hometown of Grosse Point, Michigan.

1974

David S. Barrie, Fernandina Beach, Florida, was elected chair of the board of Advanced Battery Concepts in Michigan, the first company to successfully design and commercially manufacture a bi-polar lead acid battery.

1974

James R. Breece III, Evanston, Illinois, was named deputy director of the Heritage Museum of Asian Art, a new museum in Chicago’s Chinatown.

1975

“Eight years ago my daughter and I started a grassroots effort to convert an old railroad track into a bike and pedestrian trail called the Wasson Way. It will go 7.6 miles through Cincinnati and connect to the 300-mile-long Ohio-to-Erie Trail, which goes right past Kenyon! I am thrilled to say that construction of the Wasson Way starts this summer.”

F. Jay Andress III

1975

Anne Gernert Campos, Hancock, Maryland, is working with high school students from a private girls’ school this spring, offering them an experiential learning experience in conjunction with the website she launched last year, seasonablethymes. com.

1975

Gail Elizabeth Meyer Gibson has been connecting with alums while in the process of a renovation project for Elements Theatre Company on Cape Cod. So far her quest has taken her to Town Hall Theater in Middlebury, Vermont, a restoration led by Douglas B. Anderson '75; to K. Blake Rimbault Zoephel '75 in New Jersey; to a memorable lunch by the lake with Mary Kay Karzas '75and Susan Schrier Davis '75 in Chicago; and to New Orleans for coffee with Renee Brandt Peck '75.

1975

Writing from Takoma Park, Maryland, is Robert A. Gibson, whose update reminds us to distinguish him from the Rev. Robert B. Gibson '75 — “the WKCO DJ whose program was labeled ‘Very Hard Rock.’” Bob (A.) has been a newspaper reporter, Peace Corps volunteer, magazine writer documenting life and change in rural America and worker on electrification projects in the developing world.

1975

Richard E. Gordon reports having, at the time of his update, “fewer than 870 days to go until retirement from the University of Delaware — but who’s counting?”

1975

Murray J. Smith and Janet Byrne Smith ’76 are readying their home on Gaskin Avenue once Murray’s retirement after over 30 years with the U.S. State Department is finalized in June. “To prepare for the upcoming move,” he writes, “we’ve spent many days clearing decades of accumulated stuff out of our New Jersey house. Once we’re settled in Gambier, visitors are welcome!”

1975

Jonathan J. Towle is back in his home state of Connecticut after 30 years at JPMorgan Chase in New York. He is busy with an informal audio club and running a crossword blog, “Times for the Times,” with 23 bloggers.

1976

“After 4 1/2 in Kazakhstan, my husband, Dermot, and I have moved to Cairo, Egypt. I was promoted to managing director, Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Region, for the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development. After five cold Kazakh winters, it’s great to be in warm weather again.”

Janet E. Heckman

1976

Jan Brozic Kinch, Edinboro, Pennsylvania, retired after 28 years as a professor of English and looks forward to traveling back to Germany and Austria, where she lived for six years, two of them on a Fulbright.

1976

Mary E. Fountain Loesch, Big Rapids, Michigan, stopped swimming for a while due to shoulder pain but now teaches tai chi for the Mecosta County Senior Center and — for “stress reduction” — belly dances. She’ll tour Egypt with a belly dance group out of Toronto for two weeks.

1976

“My work in New Mexico early-childhood policy reconnected me with William S. “Steve” Barnett, director of the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers. Steve came to New Mexico in January to speak with our legislature on the importance of investing in our youngest children.”

Kim M. Straus

1977

Rosemary P. Williams Begley, Louisburg, Kansas, continues to paint for Disney theme parks and recently attended the Epcot International Festival of the Arts at Disney World.

1977

Mieke H. Bomann, Greenfield, Massachusetts, teaches nonfiction writing part-time and is a tour guide at the mid-19th-century home of poet William Cullen Bryant.

1977

“After years of discovery research in immunology at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children, we have a novel immune checkpoint therapy in clinical trials — an exciting milestone. Fingers crossed that the drug has impact against adult blood cancers and can then be tested in kids.”

Jayne S. Danska

1977

Susan Allen Ford is an English professor at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi, editing the scholarly periodicals of the Jane Austen Society of North America.

1977

Mary Lou Jansen-Fusi, a nurse practitioner in Madison, Connecticut, focuses on wellness and nutrition and addiction. “I’m painting with oils and have a show in Branford,” she reports. “I’m also the lead singer in a cool band!”

1977

Niles W. Keeran returned from Glendale, Arizona, to Canton, Ohio, to care for his 93-year-old mother from 2010 until her death in 2015. He works part-time in engineering consulting and, as a certified naturalist, is very active with the Sierra Club.

1977

Alan R. Lewine, Springfield, Pennsylvania, and his wife, classical singer Ana Maria Ruimonte, have reactivated Owlsong Productions and are putting all their energy into musical projects, including recording in Havana with Huberal Herrera, “one of the great piano maestros of Cuba and now 87 years old,” he reports. Their new release was due in May.

1977

Marc F. Millon took part in the first Kenyon-Exeter program of study in 1975. More than 40 years later, he lives in Devon, England, with his wife, Kim, whom he met there. Since then, together they have written and photographed 14 books and numerous magazine articles on food, travel and wine — the last of which he has been enjoying a good deal of with his old friends David H. Lynn ’76 and professor Wendy Singer, who co-hosted the program again this year. For Martin Randall Travel, Marc leads gastronomic tours of Italy, France and the West Country.

1977

Margaret Ann Murphy, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, attended the retirement ceremony of Professor Howard Sacks, who is “only five years older than I am!” she points out. Margaret, who received her University of Michigan sociology Ph.D. in 2010, lectures at Oakland University and was married in 2013.

1977

Rabbi Stacy K. Offner cites “40 years of blessings: from rabbinical school in Jerusalem, Los Angeles and New York to my first pulpit in Minnesota, where I lived for 24 years, to a stint in New York City with our national Reform Jewish offices, to my current gem of a congregation here in Madison, Connecticut. My family has grown to include my wife of 30 years, two children now married, and a 5-year-old grandson who is my everything.”

1977

Paula A. Stoeke, Santa Monica, California, took a master’s in psychology, gathered a great community of close friends, and now works happily both as an art curator and composer of large paintings, illustrations and photo-graphs — striking examples of which are at paulastoekephotography.com.

1977

Thomas W. Toch, Chevy Chase, Maryland, has launched FutureEd, a new education think tank at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy.

1977

Matthew A. Winkler, in his 11th year as a Kenyon trustee and 22nd as a trustee of the Kenyon Review, now editor-in-chief emeritus of Bloomberg News, writes a bi-weekly column for Bloomberg View. He has taught journalism students as a visiting professor in Beijing and Shanghai and at Northwestern University. He and Lisa will celebrate their 35th anniversary on road bikes in Spain.

1977

Kimberly R. Zimmerman, Shadow Hills, California, still practicing pediatric medicine after 29 years, was executive producer of two award-winning films: “The Titanic of Southampton” (a short documentary featuring the son of one of the survivors), and “SMART: Specialized Mobile Animal Rescue Team” (a feature-length documentary on a highly trained Los Angeles animal control unit comprising “passionate animal lovers who risk life and limb to rescue all kinds of creatures in need”).

1978

Holly C. MacIsaac Berkley, living in wine country outside San Francisco, supports women in STEM fields via her company, BlissSmart, speaking at women in tech conferences and publishing her second book, “365 Life Shifts: Pivotal Moments That Changed Everything.”

1978

Andrew C. LeGros, Waite Hill, Ohio, retired after 37 years in investing. “Since my last note,” he updates, “I continue to pursue the goal of becoming one of the best wingshooters in the world.” He appeared in Shooting Sportsman, was selected to an American team of shooters going to Scotland in late fall, and will train at the complex of the British Olympic coach.

1978

Robert K. Lundin, Glen Ellyn, Illinois, seeks professional production of his three plays. His work “The Cornerstone” was “elaborately staged” over Memorial Day weekend at Chicago Dramatists, with an old-time string band in attendance.

1978

William McCown, Ruston, Louisiana, writes: “I didn’t have kids until past 50, so I suddenly know where you hardworking folks disappeared to all of those missing years. Now 61 with a 10- and 5-year-old, I stepped down from my university’s graduate school to have more family time. This summer I am publishing or presenting three professional papers on — don’t laugh, because it is serious — the psychological aspects of procrastination.”

1978

R. Todd Ruppert, Owings Mills, Maryland, had his recent film, “A Year in Port,” selected as one of three finalists for documentary of the year at the James Beard Awards. Also, he joined the board of an Australian company called Mobecom, which went public on the Australian Securities Exchange in early May.

1978

Millicent Nuver “Penny” Simmelink, Avon Lake, Ohio, and her husband are proud grandparents of two baby girls and a busy 3-year-old boy. Her career development and placement business, Career Links LLC, is still going strong, and she works as an adjunct professor in John Carroll University’s Graduate School for Clinical Mental Health.

1978

Four years ago, Joseph B. Szwaja, Seattle, founded New Dawn Guatemala, a nonprofit providing scholarships, job training and clean water systems for the eponymous village of Nuevo Amanecer, “whose members suffered greatly during their country’s civil war, ending in 1998,” he writes. Joe is making a documentary film chronicling the heroic return from Mexico of refugees as they struggle to rebuild their community. A high school history and Spanish teacher, Joe previously served as a member of the Madison, Wisconsin, city council.

1978

“After 32 years as an attorney with a disability rights organization, I became the firm-wide attorney on all matters regarding access for customers with disabilities at JPMorgan Chase. While there, I chaired the Ohio legal department pro bono committee and we established a partnership with the Legal Aid Society of Columbus. I then returned to advocacy for children with disabilities and became of counsel with Agins & Gilman.”

Susan G. Tobin

1979

The Lords basketball team of 1976-77 reconnected with head coach Jim Zak on campus during last year’s reunion. Present were John P. Halpern '79, Mark L. Thomay '79, Mark P. Leonard ’76, Timothy P. Appleton ’77, Daniel J. Martin ’78, John E. Van Doorn ’76, Andrew M. Johnston '79, Evan S. Eisner ’77, Scott D. Rogers ’80 and Drew Peterson ’80.

1979

After almost 30 years as an urban planner/land manager in Fairbanks, Alaska, Douglas T. Braddock retired and will winter in Bend, Oregon. As a board member of a concert association in Fairbanks, Alaska, he’s drawn to the far north such artists as Martin Short, Béla Fleck, Chick Corea and David Sedaris.

1979

Gerard T. “Jerry” Iacangelo, Manalapan, New Jersey, returned from China, where he celebrated Chinese New Year, climbed Mount Huashan, viewed the Great Wall, saw the Terra Cotta Army and “met new and old friends at the port city of Taizhou,” he reports.

1979

Kim McGinnis is vice president of sales and marketing for a minor league baseball club, the San Rafael Pacifics, in Marin County, California.

1979

William C. Seaman, Harper Woods, Michigan, bought a 1950 Oliver 77 tractor last year that is, he notes, “like all the barns and houses on the farm and a fair number of my brothers and sisters, older than me. It’s great to be out on a noisy and somewhat unreliable machine.”

1980s

1980

Bret R. Cohen and his Brazilian-born wife, Mirna, live in Saarbrucken, Germany, where he just began a bachelor’s degree in computer science taught partly in German. They have a one-year-old daughter named Bernarda.

1980

Roger O. Fillion, Evergreen, Colorado, is senior editor of Marijuana Business Daily — the “Wall Street Journal and Fortune” of the multibillion-dollar industry of marijiuana, which is now “legal in more than half the country (and counting) in either medical or adult-use form,” he writes.

1980

Lloyd E. Hamovit, Newberry, Massachusetts, has enjoyed the last four years seeing his alma mater through the eyes of daughter Nora D. Hamovit ’17. “If you had asked me 37 years ago if I would have a legacy one day graduate from Kenyon, wow.”

1980

Quentin R. Hardy, Berkeley, California, left the New York Times to become head of editorial for Google Cloud, with “a plan to do journalism from inside the world’s largest computer system,” he reports.

1980

Michael J. Kaufman was appointed dean of the Law School at Loyola University Chicago, on whose faculty he has served for 30 years.

1980

Epidemiology and population health professor Richard A. Kerber Jr. writes: “Living for the moment in Louisville, Kentucky. My professional interests in cancer took a new turn in October 2015 when I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood and marrow that is not curable with current tools. Since then, I’ve undergone a couple of stem cell transplants and a lot of chemo. Feeling good mostly, and thinking hard about what kinds of permanent marks I can leave on the landscape.”

1980

Drew A. Peterson, Del Mar, California, celebrates the “smiling” of the National Institutes of Health upon his research into pelvic physiology and how the brain controls its own sensory input. His lab and staff received an NIH award funding them for the next three years.

1980

Robert A. Rubin writes, edits and teaches near Raleigh, North Carolina. His fifth book, “Going to Hell in a Hen Basket: An Illustrated Dictionary of Modern Malapropisms,” which he illustrated, hit bookstores last year. As “the Book Doc,” Rob helps writers get published at rubinwriting.net.

1981

Philip N. “Kip” Haselton, Bernardsville, New Jersey, is CEO of Detex Corp., a door hardware and security products manufacturer with which his family has been involved since 1923. “I hope to ply the waters off Boothbay Harbor, Maine, this summer in a small sailboat,” he writes, “and welcome any who would like to join me and my wife, Kerry.”

1981

Andrew E. Katz and Janet Richardson Katz recently moved into Green Oak Farm, an eco-friendly homestead they have designed and built over the last seven years near Fort Wayne, Indiana. Andy’s medical practice keeps him busy, as does his teaching as an associate clinical professor at the Indiana School of Medicine. Janet completed her master’s in sustainable food systems and produced the documentary “From Fencerows to Foodsheds.”

1981

Dorothy Lenard, Bloomington, Indiana, left the 8-to-5 workforce to care for aging parents, make jewelry and pursue self-employment as a college preparation coach for students with disabilities.

1981

Wendy A. MacLeod’s play “Women in Jeopardy!” is being staged around the country. “I just workshopped another play, ‘Juan Deere,’” she adds, “at Key City Public Theater in Port Townsend, Washington, at the invitation of artistic director Denise Winter ’87. I’ll be directing it next spring at Kenyon.”

1981

Stephanie Resnick, a business trial lawyer with Fox Rothschild, was named managing partner of its Philadelphia office.

1981

“Having now completed 31 years as a professor at another small, Midwestern liberal arts college situated on top of a hill (St. Olaf), I’m getting to the point where I can envision (figuratively) sailing off into the sunset, all the while enjoying my grandchildren.”

Matthew P. Richey

1981

Lisa C. Wood is a partner at Foley Hoag LLP, where she chairs its litigation department, representing the Big Four and other national accounting firms in government enforcement and litigation matters. She and her husband, who live in Medfield, Massachusetts, have enjoyed having both 20-something daughters back at home after college while they work in Boston.

1982

Nathaniel A. Dickinson recollects: “After completing my studio arts degree, I began a 30-year journey that finally brought me back to making art. In 2013 my wife, Erin, and I retired early and found our way to Asheville, North Carolina, where I took up painting full-time. Find me at Riverside Studios in the River Arts District or look for shows around Down East Maine.”

1982

Rebecca Murphy Flynn, Owings Mills, Maryland, celebrated 30 years of marriage to Jeffrey Y. Flynn ’84 last September, writing: “We have two boys, both in college. After a rocky 2015 when I battled breast cancer, we’re back on our heels and doing great! Jeff works in D.C. in commercial real estate, and I am board chair for the Jemicy School, serving children with learning differences.”

1982

Francis “Corky” Hood Hebert reports a strong showing at the memorial service for dear friend and classmate Sara H. “Sally” Camp '82, who died of cancer on Jan. 15. “We sang the Kenyon Farewell,” Corky writes. “Not too many dry eyes in the house.” Corky’s floral business, Petal Pushers, is up and running, and she and her sister took a blue ribbon for the third year in a row at the Philadelphia Flower Show.

1982

Grace Keefe Huebscher, a Kenyon Review board member, is transitioning out of her executive position with Capital One. She can pursue some passions she put on hold while selling her company and achieving empty-nest status now that daughter Erin and son Brian are in college. She and Charlie split time between Palm Beach, Florida, and Chevy Chase, Maryland.

1982

Maryanna Danis Klatt, Columbus, Ohio, is having fun providing her eight-week mindfulness/yoga intervention to hospital units, cancer survivor groups and busy working adults. “Teaching how to slow our lives down so we can actually live them is fun,” she writes, “but learning from my students is even better.”

1982

Tracy O’Donnell Stone and her husband, Jim, marked three decades of owning their B&B, The Inn at Mitchell House in Chestertown, Maryland, years during which dozens of 1982 graduates and other 1980s graduates visited for fun-filled weekends.

1982

In Oberlin, Ohio, the members of Christ Episcopal Church celebrated the 30th anniversary of the Rev. Brian K. Wilbert’s ordination to the priesthood by commissioning a hymn tune bearing his name and composed by noted Anglican musician Bruce Neswick.

1982

James L. Zellner joined the Chattanooga Heart Institute’s expanding team of 23 board-certified cardiologists to perform advanced heart surgeries as a cardiothoracic surgeon.

1983

Anne Allen Chamberlin announces that after four years of battling two cancers, she is “on the way to being cancer-free! To celebrate I am going to Nepal in October and trekking to Mount Everest base camp. Take that, cancer!”

1983

In Canton, Ohio, Gregg O. Courtad finds that as the problems in his neighborhood appear to be dissipating, he has taken a “Love It or List It” approach to his house by renovating all four stories: “Most exciting so far was purchasing various pieces of antique stairways on eBay and having a team of Amish carpenters implement my design for a dramatic staircase landing at the foot of the old stairs,” he reports.

1983

Stephen D. Hays reports on the recent work of 120db Films, his firm that invests in independent movies: “Pet projects include ‘By This River,’ following three charming Afghan migrant boys from their landing in Greece in 2015 through their resettlement in Germany, and ‘Workingman,’ a study of white working-class men from three unrelated families in the coal and steel belts of Ohio, Pennsylvania and Kentucky.”

1983

Daniel J. Kopman was named CEO of Heavy Seas Beer, an iconic brand in Baltimore. As a co-founder of Schlafly Beer in St. Louis, Dan helped change the city’s beer culture and revive two blighted neighborhoods.

1983

Amy McCloskey proudly accepted one of the finer awards afforded to those recently turned age 55 when a Millennial hipster declared her to be “O.G.” (She had to look it up, too.) Her New York bar, Madame X, turns 20.

1983

Stephen B. Polk informs: “Still married in Malibu with two teens (athletes/students), two dogs (companions/mixes), and two kids (adolescents/goats).” His new multimedia production company and advocacy group merges independent film with tech to address social issues and galvanize activism.

1983

William S. Sondheim, Fairfield, Connecticut, runs a mid-size independent film and TV distribution company that “used to sell to places like Walmart and Target but now sells to Netflix, Amazon and Hulu.”

1983

Douglas H. Thompson relocated to Lebanon, Pennsylvania, and celebrates his first anniversary with “the lovely Lisa.”

1983

Norman M. Valz reports big changes: “Last April 9, I married the lovely Mareen Miltow in Lyon, France, and the two of us were blessed by the birth of our daughter Vanessa on Jan. 24. My incredible stepson Marc (10), who hardly spoke a word of English when he arrived in Philadelphia from Lyon in early 2016, is now quite fluent.”

1984

Andrew O. Bunn, Short Hills, New Jersey, happily reports that his third daughter, Schuyler, will join the class of 2021 this fall.

1984

Joseph Caperna, still doctoring in San Diego, updates: “In private practice over four years — big leap of faith after being part of the big university for 23 years, with pensions and such. I’ve been able to focus more on holistic approaches, safer treatments in medicine.”

1984

Rolf J. Pendall reports that among his colleagues at the Washington, D.C.-based Urban Institute is Amanda R. Gold ’12, who contributed to a report his team compiled and wrote about the economy and demographics of the Great Lakes states, including Ohio. “The biggest surprise for me was that, starting in the mid-1980s, manufacturing employment stabilized, but then from 2000 to 2010 it dropped 35% (45% in Michigan, 39% in Ohio).”

1984

Craig J. Richardson chairs the economics department at Winston-Salem State University, is “happily married to Cathy, and between them they have six children, three each.” He enjoys tennis, sailing and traveling — this year to one of his bucket-list destinations, Vietnam.

1984

Mary Salmon Rose retired from CSX Transportation after 16 years as a corporate trainer. “Looking forward to a move to southern Colorado later this year to begin life’s next adventure.”

1984

Kristen E. Sorenson lives in Garrison, New York, in the Hudson Valley, just down the street from Dirk R. Westphal ’86 and Anne C. Symmes '84. The highlight of her last six months was a sabbatical from West Point, allowing her time to travel to Norway to visit ancestral homes with her parents and then on to Switzerland and Spain with just the children.

1984

Jonathan P. Spira brings his 20 years of building and managing technology and consumer industries to a new position as the chief financial officer of Nikola Motor Co., which plans to bring the first zero-emissions long-haul class-8 truck to the market.

1984

William G. Troyer III, Chicago, semi-retired after 18 years in the security field, writes that his work is “now concentrated on helping the disadvantaged, a cause I learned in my Phi Kappa Sigma days.”

1984

Cynthia Frost White runs a Chicago-based business with her father Calvin S. Frost ’63 and brother-in-law Richard C. Hoffman ’89. She Snapchats with Pam Sweet Blau '84 and others and has found “the perfect blend of raising three awesome kids, a challenging work environment, and enjoying new and favorite places around the world.”

1984

Jennifer Goodwin Wolcott, Sudbury, Massachusetts, started a new venture hosting small-group tours to France with her French husband, Bernard. Their focus is on “food, wine and wellness.”

1985

Susan Hillenbrand Avallon, Los Angeles, has worked at Columbia Pictures for 25 years, looking for movie projects and editing screenplays. She logged her most recent work on “Passengers,” “Smurfs: The Lost Village,” and the reboots of “Jumanji” and “Flatliners.”

1985

John C. Dulske, San Antonio, Texas, joined the government policy and practice group of the Dykema law firm as senior counsel. Dulske focuses on federal procurement litigation, contract administration and claims litigation, and bid protest work.

1985

Jonah A. Maidoff, Chilmark, Massachusetts, was granted a Vision Fellowship that funded development of a social science and environmental science curriculum for high school students. The grant included support for a trip to Alaska last summer to work at the Woods Hole Environmental Center with NASA scientists on the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment.

1985

James D. Morrison Jr., Loveland, Ohio, shares: “Had the good fortune of the birth of my first grandbabies! My daughter Ashley D. Morrison ’07 and Megan E. Sheasby ’06 had healthy twins delivered by our own Christopher Fleming '85.”

1985

Neil L. Pepe, New York City, was honored by the Atlantic Theater Company for his 25 years of artistic leadership at a Directors’ Choice Gala in March.

1985

Diana L. Mears Peterson, a part-time pediatrician in Burlington, North Dakota, still runs a winery and distillery with her husband. Her three daughters are in college, including Sarah C. Peterson ’18.

1985

Glenn L. Singer became director of admissions at Springdale Preparatory School, a startup boarding and day school in north central Maryland, which opens this August. He’ll seek 30 to 60 new students. “Searching high and low for people with pioneer spirit who will get excited about building school community and culture!”

1985

Kathleen Fulmer Waller finished her graduate teaching certificate in TESOL at the University of Cincinnati and seeks employment teaching English as a second language in elementary school this fall.

1985

David R. Watson, formerly executive director for the New York State Bar Association, was named executive director of the Institute of Continuing Legal Education, the education provider of the State Bar of Michigan, which serves five prominent Michigan universities.

1986

Thomas E. Arend Jr., Chevy Chase, Maryland, has been named CEO of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. He departs the American College of Cardiology, where he was executive vice president, chief operating officer and general counsel.

1986

Robert S. Bridges Jr. accepted a new position as senior investment adviser with Wilmington Trust in New York.

1986

Stephen E. Feinbloom is a clinical social worker for Essex County Community Services in Elizabethtown, New York. As a psychotherapist and intake coordinator at its mental health clinic, he helps coordinate the county’s various systems of care for children and adults.

1986

Paulo E. Franco Jr., Richmond, Virginia, updates that his new record, “The Last Card,” received favorable attention in national music journals such as No Depression and Paste magazine. The title track is written in memory of fellow alumnus Thomas M. James ’85.

1986

Byron P. Gallagher Jr. informs that his son, Byron P.M. “Tripp” Gallagher III, reports to the Naval Academy in June for induction and plebe summer. Pat describes Mary Beth Stephens '86 as “instrumental in preparing Tripp for the rigorous essays and interviews required. She did an outstanding job of getting Tripp dialed in and ready to rock and roll in a very short amount of time.” (Adds Mary Beth: “I did not ask Pat to include me — he has an amazing son!”)

1986

John W. Zinsser is now the chief ombudsman for the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, Switzerland, leading its global conflict-management system. John and his wife, Andrea Schenck, retain a home in Charleston, South Carolina.

1987

“A year ago I opened At Altitude Gallery in Cape Charles, Virginia — world’s only gallery to feature landscape aerial photography exclusively. For the past 10 years, I have been photographing the East Coast from a small plane, focusing on coastal marshlands and barrier islands.”

Gordon W. Campbell

1987

Susan Flinn Cobian and her husband, Randy, moved from New York back to Chicago to be closer to family and to start a pharmaceutical ad agency. In the process, they bought her great-grandmother’s 100-year-old house in southern Michigan, spent two years renovating it, and finally moved in last summer.

1987

Neil Gluckman works for the Atlanta Stage Technicians, IATSE Local 927, recently completing a successful organizing drive for rock-and-roll workers that resulted in a contract with Live Nation and raised wages from $10 per hour to $16 per hour with annual increases and worker protection.

1987

Lilly J. Goren, Shorewood, Wisconsin, has big news: “I’ll be a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Bonn, Germany, in the late spring and summer of 2018, teaching courses at the graduate and undergraduate level.”

1987

Fawn C. Lewis is a pediatric surgeon and medical director of children’s surgical services at the new Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

1987

Paul W. Muller is in his 23rd year as a public defender in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, where “the novelty never wears off,” he reports.

1987

Craig A. Phares, since the arrival of three children, has begun to reconnect with fellow downtown Manhattan parents, namely Alexander T. “Lex” Sidon ’86 and Catherine C. Greenman ’89. He also has been able to spend time with his old friend Timothy Williams '87, who relocated east from Seattle to head his firm’s D.C. and NYC office. Craig and Tim had dinner several months ago with Allan L. Maca Jr. '87, who splits his time between NYC and his new house on the beach in Costa Rica.

1987

Kathleen Shea Smith is now associate provost for academic advising at the University of Oklahoma.

1988

From Mattapoisett, Massachusetts, Annette Larson Brickley updates: “I’m a science education consultant with a passion for working with zoo, aquarium, park and museum educators to change the nature of public conversation about issues of climate change to be inviting, empowering and solutions-oriented.”

1988

Christopher Hammett saw his Falconworks Theater Company, founded with his husband, named Best Community Theater by the Village Voice in its October “Best of NYC” issue.

1988

Peter O. Harper heads the North and Latin America branches of Guinness World Records and writes that Dean A. Rader, who lives a few towns away from Peter’s home in Maplewood, New Jersey, suffers a beating in their games of euchre, regardless of the partner.

1988

Allison E. Joseph, Carbondale, Illinois, announces the publication of her latest books of poems, “Double Identity” from Singing Bone Press and “The Purpose of Hands” from Glass Lyre Press. She won the 2017 New Georgia Arts Literary Achievement Award of the New Georgia Arts Collaborative, a greater Atlanta coalition of writers, educators and patrons.

1988

Kent L. Karosen moved to Miami Beach, Florida, with his husband. He has dedicated 100 percent of the proceeds of his book “Why Can’t Grandma Remember My Name?” to the Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation, of which he is president and CEO. The book juxtaposes kindergartners’ art with work by Alzheimer’s patients.

1988

Janet E. Lord, Baltimore, has traveled to Turkmenistan, Belarus, China, Cote d’Ivoire and Egypt in the past six months for her international human rights work. Her forthcoming co-edited book with Cambridge University Press, titled “Right to Inclusive Education in International Human Rights Law,” is due out this year.

1988

Laurie Ewers Polite, Chicago, works in Illinois’ Medicaid program “despite no state budget and attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act,” she writes.

1988

At least twice a year, the Ladies from New Apartments A-3 reconvene, including Susanna H. “Susie” Brown '88, Susan Lind Quigley '88, Patricia Rossman Skrha '88, Lynne A. Schneebeck '88 and Laura “Jill” Tibbe Caudy '88. Laurie, Lynne and Pattie enjoyed an Indians World Series win in Cleveland last October. Members of the group also got to catch up with Betsy (aka Weazel) Mikes ’86 and Bruce (aka Bags) Gerber '88.

1988

Kai P. Schoenhals shares this from Cuba: “‘Fidel is dead’ was the text message that woke us at 5 a.m. on Nov. 26, 2016. The country was the quietest it’s ever been. A nine-day moratorium on music and alcohol lent to the eerie bewilderment and awesome stillness of sound. Akin to a solar eclipse — no car horns, no reggaeton from bike-taxis, no bands, no music on the radio. Except for a solitary cannon blast every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Even the most ardent opponents were numbed, mournful and ultimately respectful of the man’s impact.” Kai adds that he received the Cuban authorities’ approval to film a documentary series there.

1988

Paul Singer, Washington, D.C., invents “fake news” while overseeing congressional and political coverage for USA Today’s weekly “Cup of Politics” podcast.

1988

Kent Wellington thanked his “awesome Kenyon friends” for attending the 10th anniversary celebration of Karen’s LIVING with Breast Cancer Foundation in Cincinnati. He adds, “April 1 also would have been her 50th birthday.”

1989

Andrew S. Albrecht, Shaker Heights, Ohio, left GE after more than 17 years, “saddened to leave all the great people I knew” but excited for his new opportunity with AT&T. Once Andy and Jean Bayless Albrecht ’88 send their youngest, Ethan, off to Hobart and William Smith Colleges in the New York Finger Lakes region, they plan to travel extensively, starting with a trip to Italy in the fall of 2018.

1989

In September, Sarah B. Cunningham will launch the Arts Research Institute at Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts and serve as its executive director. She and her husband, sculptor Matt King, welcomed baby boy Julian in November 2015.

1989

Peter A. Groustra celebrated a milestone birthday with Ansel Jason “Jay” Sears II '89, Alex Maurer '89, Steven C. Eberhardt '89 and Steven E. Mischler '89 at “an undisclosed Caribbean location.”

1989

Susan F. Bloom Hudgins was here on the Hill during a great weekend in February when it was an eerily warm 72 degrees while she visited her oldest son, who takes English and physics classes with some professors familiar to ’89ers. Susie still loves working with students with dyslexia or executive function challenges.

1989

Alec C. Jerome marked 20 years at the Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan, where he is senior facilities manager. In December he completed a master’s program in historic preservation.

1989

Brian P. McDonald, who lives in Hudson, Ohio, recently left Hedstrom Entertainment to join a new toy and lifestyle startup called Simplay3 as vice president of sales.

1989

Sarah Turgeon Perry, Shutesbury, Massachusetts, sends her oldest son, Alexander T. Perry ’21, to the Hill this fall.

1989

Susan Hope Rodefer has lived in Qatar for 24 years. “Still working as director of the Academic Resource Center for Carnegie Mellon University here in Doha, enjoying the perks of expat life (recent trips to Barcelona, Edinburgh and Venice!).”

1989

Bob Ruley was appointed executive director of the American Museum of Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vermont, home to “one of the most significant collections of fly fishing tackle, art and literature in the world.”

1989

In September, Renee A. Staton moved to London, England, where she does U.S. tax work in Canary Wharf for private equity and real estate fund clients.

1990s

1990

This autumn, Elizabeth Matt “Libby” Lemire, New Hartford, New York, sends eldest daughter Duffy Lemire ’21 to Kenyon for her freshman year.

1990

Jon Rakestraw, Highland Springs, Virginia, is now a FIFA-licensed soccer agent; his expert tips and advice are at rabonaboyz. com.

1990

Karen L. Riley, Geneseo, New York, was selected as a member of Team USA for the International Federation of Sleddog Sports, enabling her to travel to Haliburton, Ontario, Canada, for the Winter Sleddog World Championships in January. Karen finished 12th in the six-dog class and eighth in the eight-dog class — the latter not enough to medal but nevertheless making her the fastest U.S. competitor.

1990

Michael A. Ueland is now senior vice president of global sales for Minneapolis-based Digi International. He and Colleen Callinan Ueland '90 report that daughter Hannah “nervously awaits news from college admissions offices,” while Abigail is a college sophomore and Jimmy, 14, is an avid tennis player. Mike gets together regularly for runs and mountain biking with Thomas P. McGowan '90 now that he and Morgan Sellars McGowan '90 have moved to Cary, North Carolina. The Uelands keep in touch with John C. DeMarchi '90, John C. Lombardi '90, Andrew D. Meehan '90, Laurie Hessen Pomeranz '90, and Hannah E. Griswold '90, and enjoy seeing Frank E. Weise IV ’89 on Florida visits.

1990

Peter J. Whitcopf took a new position at Lancaster General Hospital (Pennsylvania) in the department of radiation oncology of the Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute.

1991

Edward C. Benyon writes from Hobart, Tasmania, where his wife, Jenny, accepted a position in 2015 as principal first violin with the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra. Ed is director of development for the orchestra.

1991

Margot Morrison Brinley, Charlotte, North Carolina, shares: “After many years working as a licensed clinical social worker, I realized that adolescent girls need more prevention and practice with positive coping skills. As a result, I created a life skills/yoga program called Guru Girls Yoga, a 10-week curriculum for fifth- and sixth-grade girls.”

1991

John G. Douglass, Tucson, Arizona, co-edited “New Mexico and the Pimeria Alta: The Colonial Period in the American Southwest,” newly published by the University Press of Colorado.

1991

Brenda Elizabeth Perkins Grim, husband Mark, and their two boys and two girls live in Duluth, Minnesota, where she has had “the honor of home-schooling our crew for the past eight years.” On a two-week Japan vacation, they “hiked into snowy mountains to see wild monkeys in hot springs, practiced a lot of basic Japanese, rode Shinkansen trains all over the country, and got an awesome dose of a remarkable country very different from our own.”

1991

Megan Lewis-Schurter, graduate program director at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst Department of Theater, is up for tenure, having finished two books — “Performing Whitely in the Postcolony: Afrikaners in South African Theatrical and Public Life” and “Magnet Theatre: Three Decades of Making Space.”

1991

Rebecca R. Post, senior communications officer with the World Bank in Washington, D.C., works with “some scary-smart economists — the continuous learning is the big draw that keeps me here.”

1992

Mazie Brandt Adams became executive director of the Lake County History Center in Painesville Township northeast of Cleveland last November. She brings her extensive museum history background to the task.

1992

Martin J. Blackwell was promoted to professor in the Department of History, Anthropology and Philosophy at the University of North Georgia. His book, “Kyiv as Regime City: The Return of Soviet Power after the Nazis,” was published by the University of Rochester Press last summer. He lives in Sewanee, Tennessee, with 3-year-old daughter Vivien and his wife, Elizabeth, associate dean at the University of the South.

1992

Kathryn D’Arcy “Kate” Blanchard was promoted to full professor of religious studies at Alma College in Michigan.

1992

Jenna J. Blum is excited by the publication of her third book, the novel “The Lost Family,” by HarperCollins in 2018. She teaches writing workshops in Boston for Grub Street Writers, now celebrating its 20th year, and spends summers writing in the rural Minnesota family house.

1992

Mike Cougar Hallenbeck, Minneapolis, recently completed sound editing, original music and mix on the animated short “Other Fish,” featuring the voices of Michael Parks and Harley Quinn Smith, in his year-old recording studio, Junior Birdman Audio. Clients making ads and training materials with him include 3M, Best Buy and Blue Cross Blue Shield.

1992

Katie Keating admits that she, her husband and two children in Park Slope, Brooklyn, “fit the stereotype of food co-op members, self-employed entrepreneurs and politically active citizens.” The ad agency Katie founded celebrated its fifth birthday.

1992

Rachel Schwartz Louis reports that she hasn’t written an update since her twins were born — “and they just turned 12! We’ve been in Williamstown, Massachusetts, for 18 years. A lot like Gambier, but surrounded by mountains instead of cornfields and with just a few more stores and restaurants, as well as several world-famous art museums.” Rachel began skating with the Southshire (Vermont) Battlecats Roller Derby team under the moniker “Ms. T. Totaler.”

1992

Guy J. Tino, Brookfield, Connecticut,is a user-acceptance testing analyst for Nielsen, “primarily focused on our Music Connect product, which pulls together sales, streaming, airplay and social data into one easy-to-use platform.”

1993

Jennifer A. Carter, Newtown, Connecticut, published “Spiked” (Blocked #3) (under the pen name Jennifer Lane), completing her sports romance series. With best friend Gwyndolyn Evans Harrison ’94 she met Shannon M. Hurley Dowdall ’94 during a great vacation in Arizona.

1993

Melissa A. Lord, Fairport, New York, marked the one-year anniversary of her thyroidectomy after a surprise diagnosis of thyroid cancer. “Other than that,” she writes, “life marches on: Our jobs and two kids keep us going at a breakneck pace, and we just try to keep up. The fact that my husband manages a wine store may or may not be the reason I’m able to stay sane some days.”

1993

Karin A. Kinne McGeary writes: “Life threw us a curveball two years ago when I was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. It has been a long journey, and I’m healthy and strong now, 18 months cancer-free. I share this news,” Kaki adds, “with the hope that it will remind everyone to keep up with routine screenings and don’t ignore it when something doesn’t seem right.” She and husband Matt live with their two children in Essex, Vermont.

1993

Trish Segal Piliado completed her administrative credential program at Washington State University and took a position last fall as director of student welfare and attendance for the Vancouver School District in Vancouver, Washington.

1993

This July, David N.G. Whiting moves back to the Philippines for three years. “We just left there in 2015,” he writes. “This effectively thwarts my plan to attend the 2018 reunion, proving that you cannot plan your State Department career around Kenyon events.”

1994

Christopher G. Calvosa types from his phone in Nigeria: “After more than 20 years in corporate America, I signed on to lead global sales and institutional partnerships for a social enterprise called VisionSpring. The organization puts quality, radically affordable eyeglasses onto the noses of people in developing countries who earn $4 per day or less.”

1994

Marshall W. Chapin is now chief strategy officer at a startup called Sense.com, “an exciting young company with a crazy technology which allows homeowners to see their energy usage in real time, at the device level, all from a single connection inside the breaker panel.”

1994

Trial attorney Kenneth P. Danzinger became a shareholder in the Chicago office of Simmons Hanly Conroy, one of the nation’s largest mass tort firms. His practice focuses on helping individuals and families affected by asbestos-related diseases.

1994

Martina E. Faulkner, Wilmette, Illinois, saw her second collaborative book, “365 Life Shifts,” published in February; her next solo book comes out this year. “Many of you,” she notes, “may recognize that a portion of it takes place during my years on the Hill. Life as an author is challenging and exciting.”

1994

Gwyndolyn Evans Harrison ’94 is now head men’s and women’s swim coach at Bridgewater College in Virginia.

1994

Eric D. Lehman, Hamden, Connecticut, is keeping busy: Last fall his novella “Shadows of Paris” was released by Homebound Publications, and this summer his historical novel “The Earth and the Darkness” will be published by the Arizona Center for Medieval Studies.

1994

After 18 years overseas, Sheila Pierce Ortona lives in San Francisco, where her husband serves as consul general of Italy.

1994

“Professor Wendy Singer connected me with Cayla M. Anderson ’18, who is on the ISLE program in Sri Lanka. Lovely to meet a present student and learn what’s happening on the Hill.”

Ravana Wijeyeratne

1995

Thomas J. Kelley is director for Arcadia University’s study abroad program in Dublin, Ireland, where he enjoys taking Kenyon students out for their first pint of Guinness. Tom was recently elected president of Baseball Ireland.

1995

Andrei N. Massenkoff was in ESPN the Magazine (online and in print) in November for his internationally recognized pinball exploits. He returned to the world championships in Pittsburgh in April, prior to which he was ranked 15th in the world. He teaches hospitalized children and their family members at University of California-San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital.

1995

Kristin Gasser Misso is in-house counsel for a global safety services company based in Houston. She and husband John have “two determined daughters, 10 and 7, who light up our lives and make it fun to explore the world. The pace is frenetic, but the view is spectacular.”

1995

Joe Stollenwerk completed his Indiana University Ph.D. in theatre and drama last year and became an assistant professor of directing at the University of South Dakota.

1996

Christopher C. Ellsworth shares: “Still on the Hill doing the same old, same old.” He recently did set design for “The Comedy of Errors” and is a Title IX investigator for the College, “something I find extremely important and, in a weird way, fairly enjoyable.”

1996

Sam Grobart moved on from a position as managing editor of digital video at Bloomberg Businessweek after being hired as executive editor of CNN Tech.

1996

Mark F. Haggarty is “surrounded by Lords and Ladies” on the Chicago staff of OneGoal, a nonprofit fostering college access and success. They include Thomas “T.D.” Dickson ’08, Dominique A. McKoy ’10, Rachel A. Oppenheimer ’10 and Devika Saxena ’04.

1996

Jesse A. Hardman married Maya Lau on March 25 in New Orleans. He is a public radio reporter, journalism educator and media developer, and she is a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times covering the LA County Sheriff’s Department.

1996

Margaret C. Maloney, who completes her M.F.A. in screenwriting at UCLA this June, was just hired to write her first movie, a romantic comedy. A TV comedy pilot she wrote also placed in the Austin Film Festival Screenwriting Competition.

1996

Jamie Lyn Smith splits her time between Knox County and Bluffton University, where she teaches creative writing and edits the literary magazine, Bridge. She was nominated for a Pushcart Prize this year for her writing in American Literary Review and Barely South.

1997

Gretchen E. Baker relocated from Chicago to Los Angeles to become vice president of exhibitions at the Natural History Museum of LA County.

1997

Jamion L. Berry returned to the Hill for Alumni Council and writes that the Alumni of Color Mentoring initiative “has really set sail. It was such a sight to see the impact that we are still able to make on the campus as a whole and these aspiring students.” While there, he helped honor Wayne Albertyn '97, “epicenter of all the magic that was Kenyon’s best soccer team in history!”

1997

Timothy E. Cook married Silvia Susan Cuellar in Ravello, Italy, on Oct. 8. They reside in Annapolis, Maryland.

1997

Amanda Gadrow, Newark, Ohio, a software engineer at RStudio, represented her company at the Women in Statistics and Data Science conference last October. She is still singing in the Kenyon College Community Choir.

1997

Kathryn M. Jemmott is enjoying her new position as a licensed clinical social worker on the bone marrow transplant unit at University of Florida Health in Gainesville, Florida.

1997

B. Noble Jones will return to campus by bicycle in August when he participates in Pelotonia, cycling 180 miles from Columbus to Gambier and back to raise money for the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.

1997

Barbara L. Kakiris notes that “a group of us has planned a memorial for classmate Elena Grant Cahir '97 and will be purchasing a bench on Middle Path with a plaque dedicated to her.” She welcomes classmate contributions.

1997

Melonie A. Nance and husband, both M.D.s in Pittsburgh, were recently invited to speak on oropharyngeal cancer at the Asian Society of Head and Neck Oncology in Bali, Indonesia. A board of trustees member for Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, she co-chairs its committee on diversity and inclusion in ballet.

1997

Kelli A. Stebel Schrade joined the Stephans Van Liew and Oiler Group of Graystone Consulting as a senior partner. She leads manager assessment and due diligence efforts for its Chicago investment consulting team.

1997

Elisabeth B. Weed joined forces with publishing colleagues to open The Book Group, a full-service literary agency in New York, last June.

1997

Amanda K. Berg Wilson spent five months last spring and summer in the cast of “Sweet & Lucky” with the Denver Center Theatre Company, and she just closed “Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage” with the Catamounts, the Boulder-based company for which she is artistic director.

1998

Karen S. Babb McDonald and Nathaniel J. McDonald recently bought Nate’s childhood home in Chardon, Ohio. Since July, Nate has worked as an attorney/investigator in the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.

1998

Whalen Ng married Lori Cooperider on Oct. 22 at the Longaberger Golf Course in Nashport, Ohio. The couple honeymooned in the Dominican Republic and live in Columbus.

1998

Stuart M. Rice, Mesa, Arizona, finished his Ph.D. comps, submitted his study “Memories of Learning and Expectations of Schooling” for institutional review, and begins field work this summer, all within Arizona State University’s EdPlus division. Stu and his husband, Patrick, who traveled to Japan in May, have been seeing a lot of Matthew J. Borowiecki '98 and family.

1998

Grace L. Peck Beason and Matthew S. Beason ’99 celebrate their 12th anniversary with their boys Court and Than, who begin kindergarten and preschool in the fall. Grace spent time in Boston twice with Sara E. Reish Desmond '98 and saw Lucy Corner Martin '98, Karen A. Scott '98, William K. Valentine ’97 and Cassandra C. Bujarski ’01 in California.

1998

Daniel P. Brigg and his wife, Amy, Kansas City, Missouri, welcomed third son Aleksander into the fold last fall. Big brothers Cal and Miro are excited to have a new wrestling partner in the pipeline.

1998

M. Lark Cowart, St. Charles, Illinois, welcomed daughter Meredith to the family on March 8. While her big brother, Sean, excited to have a sister, is doing his best to take good care of her, Mom and Dad are doing their best to make sure his “good care” doesn’t get overly zealous.

1998

Bryan L. Doerries, artistic director of the Brooklyn-based group Theater of War Productions, has been named public artist-in-residence by the NYC Department of Veterans’ Services and Department of Cultural Affairs.

1998

Gregory W. Foster, who grows hot peppers for a living in Irvine, California, set a Guinness World Record in November in the Puckerbutt Reaper Pepper Eating Challenge. At the Arizona Hot Sauce Expo, Greg consumed 120 grams of the Carolina Reaper, which measures 1,569,300 on the Scoville Heat Scale — 300 times hotter than a jalapeno.

1998

Rachel L. Grossman, Washington, D.C., continues “to make theater that connects artists and audiences in unexpected ways”: Her company’s play “Beertown” has been produced in three theaters nationally, and she’s assisting with a San Diego adaptation of it called “Beachtown.”

1999

“Cider-obsessed” Matthew S. Beason is considered a “longtime pillar” of the culinary community of Durham, North Carolina, where he owns Black Twig Cider House and Mattie B’s. A new restaurant, County Fare, will open in the fall.

1999

Matthew Brenner married Stephanie Horgan on Oct. 15 in Glenview, Illinois.

1999

Caroline A. Donahue, Los Angeles, hosts the podcast “The Secret Library” and recently enjoyed having Scott G. Carney ’00 on the show.

1999

Jaap Mulder moved to Toronto in 2015 for a fellowship in pediatric nephrology at The Hospital for Sick Children. Unlike when he crossed the Atlantic in 1995, westbound for Gambier, this time he “wasn’t just by myself but brought a whole family — my wife, Mirjam, sons Thomas (7) and Felix (2), and daughter Anouk (4).”

1999

David A. Shargel was elected partner at Bracewell LLP, a law and government relations firm. His New York practice focuses on general commercial litigation, internal investigations and white-collar defense, as well as issues surrounding electronic discovery and data management.

2000s

2000

Kerry E. Bowler-Yun, Johns Creek, Georgia, welcomed second daughter Mary in March 2016. Kerry is an in-house lawyer for Cisco Systems in Atlanta.

2000

Elissa L. David has taken a break from teaching English in Arlington, Virginia, to spend time with her 3-year-old and new baby. After training in Muay Thai, she now teaches kickboxing part-time, and adds that she recently bought some beautiful artwork made by Denise S. Wong.

2000

Sarah Scott Dietz finished her internal medicine residency and is now on active duty working as a staff internist at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base outside Dayton. She was promoted to major in May.

2000

Kelly P. Dillon, assistant professor of communication at Wittenberg University, was awarded the 2017 Dissertation Award from the American Psychological Association’s Division of Media and Technology.

2000

Naomi Raquel Enright, Brooklyn, New York, left her job as diversity associate at the Horace Mann School and is researching other avenues for equity work. Watching her 6-year-old bilingual son, Sebastián, thrive in first grade has been a part of relishing time with her family.

2000

Jennifer Porter Grasso and husband Joe, Hudson, Ohio, welcomed their third son on Jan. 9. Rocco joins big brothers Shero (7) and Emerson (5).

2000

Elizabeth A. Hire, Bexley, Ohio, welcomed daughter Elliott to the world on Feb. 16.

2000

Apple Plotnick Janotta was named a Washington State Artist’s Trust Literary Artist last September. She is finishing her first novel, which she describes as “a timely work of speculative, anti-fascist populist fiction.”

2000

Vanessa Miller-Sims has lived in Sausalito, California, for the last six years. She and Brian welcomed “outgoing and smiley” son Spencer to the family on July 25, 2016.

2001

Nicole S. Allen joined Washington, D.C., law firm Thompson Coburn in its utilities practice, where she will work on energy-related matters by helping its clients navigate dramatic changes in the regulatory landscape.

2001

Megan M. Buhr started a small private school in Pembroke, Massachusetts. Younger children will follow an outdoor-based Forest School model, while elementary and middle-school children study within a project-based curriculum.

2001

Brett P. Holcomb was promoted to principal at Prospect Partners, a Chicago private equity firm investing in smaller lower-middle-market companies and managing $470 million across three funds.

2001

Adam D. Marks and Alexis Braun Marks '01 took a 10-year anniversary trip to Iceland and Italy, minus the children. Adam is a hospice and palliative care physician at the University of Michigan, and Alexis received tenure at Eastern Michigan University. They joined Elizabeth D. Sweet ’03 and Eric J. Harberson '01 at the Jan. 21 Women’s March on Washington.

2001

Linzey M. Powers started a new job as development director for the Pro Bono Resource Center of Maryland.

2001

D. Clare Tessman has practiced as a neuropsychiatric prescriber at the University of Illinois’ Chicago outpatient clinic and now returns to the UIC College of Nursing for her doctoral degree as a nurse practitioner. She lives in River Forest, Illinois.

2001

Lisa M. Wennerth and her husband, Kyle Larson, Fort Collins, Colorado, welcomed a most beautiful baby daughter, Alma, into the world on Aug. 14.

2002

Alexander S. Bryant still works at St. Andrew’s-Sewanee School in Sewanee, Tennessee. At a recent independent schools conference in Austin, Texas, Sandy ran into Charles P. Rich '02, who works at Hopkins School in New Haven, Connecticut.

2002

Monica Cure, Los Angeles, will teach American literature in Romania next year on a Fulbright scholar grant, taking leave from Biola University. Her new book on the invention of the postcard as turn-of-the-20th-century new media is under contract with the University of Minnesota Press.

2002

On Nov. 22, Sarah Handyside Daily and husband Sean welcomed son Nathaniel, who joins big brother Calvin, turning 3 in May. Sarah represents photographers and fine artists for advertising campaigns and brand collaborations in New York City.

2002

Samuel K. Franklin led a citywide effort to improve teaching in all Pittsburgh Public Schools, partnering with the Gates Foundation. He now teaches at Carnegie Mellon and married his bride, Leslie on New Year’s Eve.

2002

James J. Greenwood took a new position as director of inclusion and multicultural practice at the Shady Hill School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He returns to Kenyon regularly as a new member of the Alumni Council. Last September, he ran his fourth half-marathon in Rhode Island with Samantha N. Sampson ’03 and met up with Anna A. Hargrave '02 while at a boarding schools conference in Washington, D.C., where he gave a presentation. At the independent schools’ People of Color Conference in Atlanta, he reconnected with Kamille Johnson Harless ’99, Elkinsette A. Clinton '02, Gregory B. Browne-Nichols ’04, Erika E. Prahl ’00 and Richard C. Dickinson III '02.

2002

Last June, Michael J. Krejci married Annamarie Miller Krejci, who attended the 10-year reunion with him. His wedding party included groomsmen Christian L. Lynn ’04, Neil Hall '02, J. Andrew Mills '02 and ushers Marc M. Lacuesta ’95 and Timothy F. Gillett ’00. He runs a music and booking agency, Divided Sky Entertainment, in Nashville, Tennessee.

2002

Elizabeth P. Hickey Martinich and Jeremy A. Martinich ’04, Kensington, Maryland, welcomed third child Henry in early February, reporting, “Big brother Charlie and big sister Reese can’t get enough of their little brother.”

2002

John A. Pick, a writer/producer/performer in Los Angeles, informs that his series “The Best of Craigslist,” in which he takes crazy Craigslist posts and plays the characters who post them, now airs on TruTV’s “Rachel Dratch’s Late Night Snack.”

2002

Conor J. Sheehy works as a neurologist and sleep doctor in Bellingham, Washington, where he and his wife, Robin, welcomed the birth of their third son last summer.

2002

Charles E. Thompson graduated from the Army’s School of Advanced Military Studies this spring and relocated to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, where he will serve as a planner for the 101st Airborne Division.

2002

Caleb C. Wilson’s first commercial computer game, “Cannonfire Concerto,” was published by Choice of Games.

2003

Megan Ra•fferty Barnes, Columbia, Maryland, updates: “Forgot to mention in the last Bulletin that we welcomed a third son, Zachary, into our family in May 2016.” He joins brothers Brendan and Gregory. Megan is finishing her second year as vice president of Greg’s preschool.

2003

Sarah J. Buek, marking her 14th year in St. Louis, started a consulting firm whose mission is to increase the focus, quality and impact of nonprofits’ e„fforts.

2003

Eric A. Christiansen lives outside Atlanta with his wife, Mary Frances, and two kids (4 and 2). Last year, he took a job as a pilot for JetBlue, so he runs into Kenyon folks in airport terminals.

2003

“Mario Esqueda Plascenica and I are pleased to announce the birth of our beautiful little girl, Laila. We’re loving fatherhood and looking forward to my next posting at the U.S. Embassy in Caracas, Venezuela, late this summer.”

Nathan N. Hara

2003

Veronica E. Hauad headed back to the Hill in May to work in the admissions o™ffice as senior associate dean/director of admissions recruitment and outreach.

2003

Daniel A. Johnson transferred from the Chicago offi™ce of Jenner & Block to New York with his husband, Vidur.

2003

Elizabeth M. Poett runs her cattle operation on her family’s Santa Barbara, California, ranch with her husband and two young sons. The January/February issue of Cowgirl magazine ran a cover story about her return to the land.

2003

In Blythe, California, Phillip E. Ross was appointed pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church last November. He was accepted into Claremont School of Theology, seeking a master’s in divinity.

2003

“I’m working with the Hollywood Curling Club to build a dedicated ice facility to house Los Angeles’ only Olympic curling. We worked with LA2024 (the local Olympic committee) to put on a promotional event last month, which was pretty rad.”

Rose N. Talbert Meiri

2003

Catherine N. Whetzel, Bloomington, Indiana, welcomed Charlotte to the family last November, noting “big brother Jem is thrilled, as are we.”

2004

Cynthia A. Cunningham, Mount Vernon, Ohio, became partner at her law firm of Murray, Rauzi, Kidwell & Cunningham.

2004

Elizabeth Kelly Freeman and her husband, Ned, celebrated the birth of second daughter Sally in Denver on Feb. 25. “All of us, including big sister Susie, could not be happier!”

2004

Travis M. Huddy, Chicago, announces the birth of his son, Dean, in December.

2004

Jennifer A. Judson, land warfare reporter at Defense News, returned from the United Arab Emirates on a trip covering the international defense industry. Last October, she married Jim Vastola, who works for FEMA. Among the bridesmaids were Jessica D’Ardenne Tsuda ’03, Anne C. Field '04 and Cynthia A. Cunningham '04.

2004

Vaibhav “Veb” Kumar was recently designated an advocate-on-record by the Supreme Court of India, a highly exclusive professional qualification allowing him to file cases with it. He continues his litigation practice at the High Court of Delhi and Delhi district courts.

2004

Hillary Monroe Mamis, Andover, Massachusetts, reports that daughter Connie is enjoying her new big-sister role after the birth of Broderick (“Brody”) last July.

2004

Harrison David Rivers married Christopher R. Bineham in May. The two met while Harrison was on a Jerome fellowship in the Twin Cities. Harrison’s play “Where Storms Are Born” will premiere as part of the Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts.

2005

Tim Chenette, Logan, Utah, enjoyed a parental leave last fall to care for his second child, Rose, while his wife, Sara, started a tenure-track job at Utah State University. Both teach music theory there.

2005

Daniel Z. Epstein was hired as associate counsel to the Office of White House Counsel of President Donald J. Trump. Previously, he was executive director of Cause of Action, an organization he founded and led in litigations and investigation of cronyism, corruption and abuse in government.

2005

Timothy B. Harwood married Laura Tomasko on Sept. 4 at The Woodend Sanctuary of the Audubon Naturalist Society in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The couple reside in Washington, D.C.

2006

Andrea E. Daly lives in Denmark, working on a world premiere of “Legendale,” her musical. “The show will be in Danish for the premiere, which has been a little bit of a mind trip during rehearsals for the creative team, but luckily the actors are sweet to us when we get all confused by the language.”

2006

Paul M. Gunther and Julia Plonowski Gunther ’07, Philadelphia, welcomed their daughter Evelyn to the family last summer.

2006

Emilee Kaser Harvey married Ryan Harvey in Sylvania, Ohio, on Oct. 8 and promptly moved to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for his job. “We’re posted here until May 2019,” she informs. “I’m a full-time student pursuing my master’s in public health at George Washington University and hoping to find health care contracting work for my LLC.”

2006

Molly E. Mickinak Loggins and Christopher L. Loggins ’08, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, welcomed baby boy Christopher Joseph into the world on Feb. 2.

2006

Christopher F. Loud and his wife, Marissa, have settled into their house in Traverse City, Michigan, with a brand new puppy named Wrigley (“Go Cubs”). With brother Nicholas P. Loud ’11, Chris is opening a production company with offices in Michigan and Los Angeles.

2006

Kathryn Cameron McMillan reports a big year for the family: Robert D. McMillan ’07 started his own company in Chicago, called Dearborn Denim & Apparel, which manufactures affordable, American-made jeans and other products.

2006

In Baltimore, Karly A. Burke Murphy and husband Derek welcomed daughter Aoife in December. Karly is finishing her internal medicine residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital and begins a fellowship in July.

2006

John D. Sadoˆff, Somerville, Massachusetts, works at Discovering Justice, a nonprofit that teaches civics education out of the Moakley Federal Courthouse.

2007

Emma V. Haberl Angerer completed her M.B.A. at George Washington University and is now chief of staff for breaking news and markets at Bloomberg.

2007

Lauren M. Greene and Benjamin M. Van Horrick moved from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, to Richmond, Virginia, so Ben can start his new job at Amazon after returning from his fourth deployment to Baghdad with the Marines. He will continue to serve as a reservist.

2007

Lisa A. Hamer is “an activist in the movement to abolish slavery, also known as the criminal justice system,” she writes. A felony public defender in Manhattan, Kansas, she handles approximately 200 felony cases per year.

2007

Jeremy M. “Mac” Kelly married his partner, Beth, in 2016. They enjoy using MacBeth as their name when being seated at restaurants. In Carbondale, Illinois, Mac is finishing up his doctorate in clinical psychology.

2007

Alexandra E. “Ali” Kittle, Hightstown, New Jersey, married Chris Mixon in Dallas on Oct. 15, with Emily H. Margolis '07 as one of the bridesmaids. She has been hired at Colorado Academy and will move to Denver to teach English and coach lacrosse.

2007

Adam S. Lucas, a graphic designer and educator in New York, is currently a senior designer with SYPartners, a design and strategy consultancy, and an adjunct faculty member at Maryland Institute College of Art.

2007

Ashley D. Morrison married Megan E. Sheasby ’06 last summer on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. “We also were blessed with the arrival of twins in December,” she announces.

2007

Lauren C. Ostberg and Benjamin Taylor moved to western Massachusetts near Northampton. Lauren handles intellectual property litigation at a midsize firm, and Ben is active in the contemporary art and music community. Son Clarke, born in January 2016, is reportedly “an oversized extrovert with excellent dance moves.”

2007

William F. O’Keefe III and his wife, Nina L. Holmberg O’Keefe ’09, bought a house in Minneapolis last summer. A project manager with local real estate company Bader Development, Will has opened up a handful of new and adaptive reuse apartment buildings in the area. He continues his quest to run a marathon in all 50 states.

2007

Kendra Silberschatz Strubhart of Morton Grove, Illinois, and her husband announce the birth of their second daughter on Jan. 30. Kendra returned in April to planning and executing educational and cultural programming at a historic house museum.

2007

Aaron P. Tracy completed his M.D. at Sackler School of Medicine in Tel Aviv, Israel, and began his first of three years of residency in family medicine at the University of Texas–Houston.

2008

Joel S. Beckett married Ferrin Ruiz on March 25 in Malibu, California. He is a neurosurgical resident at UCLA; Ferrin is a primary care doctor in Los Angeles.

2008

Alexander W. Caulfield married Kelsey on New Year’s Eve. He writes, “We were married in Seattle, just blocks from where we first met. Best man John F. Currier '08 and groomsman Daniel A. Gajewski ’09 were both a big help!”

2008

Anthony C. Masterson, Los Angeles, reports: “Just wrapped up my second season as the play-by-play voice for Long Beach State’s men’s basketball, and now I’ll return to normalcy as the lead MLB researcher for FOX Sports 1.”

2008

Michael Northcutt completes his residency in Cincinnati in July and will move to Chicago for a gastroenterology fellowship. His wife, Kacie, transitioned to a role as senior HR manager for GE Additive.

2008

Stephen J. Politzer-Ahles is now an assistant professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

2008

Daniel J. Rymer works as the AP coordinator and college and career counselor for an international school in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, called CIA FIRST. “I started here as a curriculum developer and full-time social studies teacher,” he explains. “My B.A. was in anthropology, so that makes sense, but now I am writing graduation policy and getting kids into college full time. Education is tough!”

2008

Jaime Straub Steers, Rye, New York, announces the birth of son William on Nov. 16.

2008

Aleksandra Brikman “Ally” Zimmerman received her Ph.D. in accounting last year from Case Western Reserve University and is now a tenure-track assistant professor at Northern Illinois University. She resides in Chicago’s western suburbs with husband Eric and son Alex.

2009

Jordan R. Pedersen, Burbank, California, is producing a short film he wrote while also working on the “umpteenth draft of a TV pilot started a million years ago,” he reports.

2009

In Atlanta in February, Sarah Cleeton Schneider and Dustin C. Schneider welcomed baby boy Oliver into their family.

2009

Jenna L. Simpson and John J. Gilsenan ’08 live in Rochester, New York, where she is a mental health therapist for an adult outpatient clinic. John works as a public defender handling appeals for the Legal Aid Society in Syracuse.

2009

Diana Ruskin Black and David M. Black live in the Shenandoah Valley, where Diana is directing a play by former Kenyon theater professor Daniel Elihu Kramer called “Pride@Prejudice: A Romantic Deconstruction.” With Adam Shoop '09 and Stephen J. Robishaw '09, she and Dave surprised Justin M. Cox '09 in Miami for his 30th birthday at the kind invitation of his wife, Johanna Ralsten-Cox '09.

2009

Mark A. Boyd, Fairview, North Carolina, saw his work featured in the App Store. Audulus, “an iOS modular synthesizer visual programming environment,” was named one of the top apps of the year.

2009

Prabhat Gautam and his partner, Kevin, are now parents of two kittens — Charcoal and Cinder. Prabhat works as a data analyst at Tufts University’s Tisch College of Civic Life and loves living in Boston and enjoying everything New England has to offer.

2009

Rodrigo Guzman-Sanchez began his second master’s degree, this time at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. He may go for an M.B.A. at its Booth School of Business next. With Harris classmates, he has two startups gearing up, one in tech and the other in policy consulting.

2009

Paige L. Markham opened her own traditional Chinese medicine practice in Lafayette, California, specializing in facial rejuvenation. She graduated from her doctoral program in April.

2009

Linda T. Pear and Daniel A. Takacs opened Snapdragon Montessori School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, last fall, offering an authentic Montessori environment for children aged 15 to 33 months.

2010s

2010

Christopher T. Brophy and Elizabeth M. Thorne “Lizzie” Brophy welcomed son Eugene, born Feb. 28, to their Boston home.

2010

Alexandra G. Davis is the morning show producer/sales assistant for WAAW Shout 94.7 FM, a black-owned gospel radio station in Aiken, South Carolina. She helps produce Shout Fest, the station’s annual free gospel music festival.

2010

Mollie F. Hart began a Fulbright in Cape Town, South Africa, teaching English and researching civil rights and the resonating e‹ffects of apartheid.

2010

Sara R. Hirsch wraps up her master’s in landscape architecture at Cornell, describing her thesis as an exploration of “how farmers can increase the resiliency of their land by managing it to accommodate beavers living in the watershed.”

2010

Benjamin S. Kester, now in his second year of residency in orthopedic surgery at New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases: “Basically a lot of hands-on time with saws, drills and X-rays. Like doing medical carpentry,” he says.

2010

Alyssa Gomez Lawrence took a position in Kenyon’s newly founded O˜ffice for Community Partnerships. Daughter Evie was born in May 2016, and in September husband Jonathan N. Lawrence ’09 became a library services supervisor on Kenyon’s LBIS team.

2010

David M. Lazarus works in Sweden as a front-end developer, “basically trying to make IKEA’s website cool to use,” he updates. “Stockholm is a great city. They have the most epic snowball fights on the third Sunday night of each month.”

2010

Janae A. Peters taught English literature for seven years in Mount Hermon, Massachusetts, but has moved to Birmingham, Alabama, to become dean of student development and community life at Indian Springs School.

2010

Geoffˆrey C. Toy and Caroline Crowell ‰’11 returned to the Hill to be married in August, with Professor of History Je‹ffrey Bowman o˜fficiating. Brandon J. Harmon, Michael W. Underwood and Darren J.H. McCorkle were among the groomsmen, and many other Kenyon friends attended. The couple resides in Decatur, Georgia, where Geo‹ff is an attorney with Waldon Adelman Castilla Hiestand and Prout, and Caroline works at the Georgia Archives.

2010

Genevieve R. Viner was accepted into the Peace Corps. If all goes according to plan, in August she will head to the Kyrgyz Republic to be an English teacher trainer until October 2019.

2010

Carrie E. Walther got married last May, honeymooned in Thailand and had a baby girl named Nora in February. “I’m teaching music in my hometown of St. Louis and staying home with Nora for a while,” she reports.

2010

Katherine F. Gruman Wright and her mother-in-law bought the century-old Alcove Restaurant in Mount Vernon and spent the last year renovating it. The restaurant reopened in March.

2011

Liza W. Chabot works in Durham, North Carolina, for a tech company that developed the website behind Open Debates, used in the 2016 election. “I’m also an artist and a weaver,” she notes, “hosting art events in the local community and selling my weavings nationally under the name Buckwheat & Grits.”

2011

Sasha‰ Pauline Fanny-Holston reports that she celebrated her birthday weekend “by going to a Planned Parenthood rally on the Boston Common when it was 10 degrees outside. After my friends and I, including Laura A. Spiegler ’10, thawed out, we went to Chinatown and ate dim sum. Halfway done with law school in May.”

2011

Sara H. Nash and husband John “J.J.” Postel ’10 of Chicago welcomed baby girl Delaney Rae in February.

2011

The Rev. Jared H. Ruark Ruari married Allison Enari last July, hence his new surname (Ruark + Enari = Ruari). The couple reside in Mansfield, Ohio, where both work as pastors.

2011

After Dhruv Vig completed a Ph.D. in cellular biophysics, he secured a postdoc at Johns Hopkins studying how machine learning could predict human stem cell behavior. His growing interest in bioengineering has now led him to SRI International, a venture capital firm in Silicon Valley, where he helps to build startups.

2012

Kelly E. Anderson, Beverly Hills, California, started working in February at Reese Witherspoon’s production company, Hello Sunshine, which will produce “movies, TV, podcasts and more, made by women for women,” she reports.

2012

Lily D. Barrett, Boston, is a software developer and instructor at Launch Academy. She also joined the leadership team at Girl Develop It, a nonprofit o‹ffering women opportunities to learn web and software development.

2012

Caitlin Cook, Brooklyn, New York, writes: “My band, Frankly Benjamin (including Gregory B. Bunis '12 and Daniel R. Thompson '12), released its debut EP, ‘To Be Frank,’ on April 1,” Caitlin’s birthday. They launched it at Rockwood Music Hall.

2012

Ian W. Curtis will conduct archival research in Paris all next year for his Yale dissertation, “which reconstructs and examines a 1948 murder trial during which the novels of André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus were invoked as part of the defense strategy.”

2012

Caroline K. “Callie” Gruman was in Austin, Texas, at SXSW on a trip for her employer, management consultancy A.T. Kearney of Chicago. At the festival, she attended a session on business in China presented by Samuel D. Heuck '12, who works in Shanghai, and ran into his brother Henry H. Heuck ’15, a programmer for SXSW.

2012

Rebecca A. Kobayashi, still planning to remain in Japan for a few more years, passed the top level of the language proficiency test and then moved to Tokyo for a job at a small company where she handles translated text and crafts English copy for annual financial and CSR reports. “I miss the vegetarian restaurants and slower pace of life in Kyoto,” she explains, “but I enjoy the capital.”

2012

Christian A. Martínez-Canchola teaches third-grade math in the District of Columbia Public Schools with Teach for America. As for grad school, “I’ve decided to hold o‹ff for now. Until then, I’m excited to discover what this next move will tell me about who I am, who I want to be and what I want to do.”

2012

Yukiha Maruyama, a full-time user experience designer specializing in health behavior change design in Boston, enjoys spending time with Lily D. Barrett '12, which “always makes my day,” she notes.

2012

Andrea E. Pohly graduates from the University of Illinois’ veterinary school and begins a residency in anatomic pathology this fall.

2012

“Following a startup/fintech stint in Berlin, I joined a consultancy. After half a year in Stuttgart, I now get to build up my own little branch in good old Hamburg. Life is good, and I ensured that our o˜ffice building is on the corner where the football stadium, carnival fair and red-light district meet.”

Laurin R.A. Schoenemann

2012

Graham H. Sorenson works, explores and goes birding in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada: “A beautiful, cold, very northern city worth looking up on a map,” he says.

2012

Christopher E. Stack, Rockville, Maryland, created rBeatz.com, a music platform to promote new indie artists.

2012

Andrew A. Tripodo graduated a year ago from a master’s program in government at NYU and has since been writing history curriculum for a charter school network called Democracy Prep.

2012

Bennett S. Davidson worked for PriceWaterhouseCoopers in Vietnam for three years. Now, after marrying Vy Huynh, the couple will return to the U.S. and pursue M.B.A. degrees at Duke.

2013

Lauren E. Amrhein is finishing her master’s in design strategy in Troyes, France, collaborating on her final project with a local nursing home.

2013

In Minneapolis, Julia C. Anderson is the access coordinator and education and public programs coordinator for the Walker Art Center.

2013

James F. Dennin, sta‹ff writer for Mic’s money section, recently moved into “an awesome Harlem apartment” with Heather P. Brennan ’14. “Lords and Ladies in need of a crash pad are welcome any time,” he adds.

2013

Philisile Dube is a data analyst for MFS Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa. Last year, Lewis R.T. Barnes ’12 and Sean S. Grant Jr. ’14 visited and had a wonderful dinner with her family.

2013

Nicholas W. Lehn spent the last year and a half on a project to improve STEM education in Baltimore public elementary schools as part of his research assistantship at Johns Hopkins. A move to Washington, D.C., is in the works.

2013

Liliana E. Martinez is finishing her master’s in international aff‹airs/conflict resolution with a focus on the Middle East. This summer she will be resident director of the Critical Language Scholarship program in Tangier, Morocco.

2013

Paul A. Nierzwicki moved to Columbus, Ohio, last year after completing his Teach for America assignment in Cleveland. At Ohio State University, he is pursuing an M.B.A., focusing on brand management and marketing.

2013

Samantha M. Sheahan, Arlington, Virginia, has been helping out with a live musical devised and performed by a group of developmentally disabled artists. Titled “Out of Monet,” it’s about saving the local art museum in a time of technology and greed, and the art comes to life.

2013

Frances S. Sutton reports she is “slogging her way through an anthropology Ph.D. at Ohio State,” teaching an introductory course to undergrads and “trying her best to channel Professor Dave Suggs.”

2014

Daniel C. Akuma, Philadelphia, recently “returned from a baller spring-break trip in Tampa, Florida, where he met up with Tatenda Uta ’12,” he reports. Now he has to “try all the tricks in the book to refocus” and complete his first year of med school at Penn.

2014

Brandylyn L. Arredondo returned from competing and training in ballroom dance in Italy and London, noting that “the months paid off‹.” She will compete at the U.S. Nationals with the American champions before she and her partner are o‹ff to London to compete in Blackpool. Once back in D.C., she found a job as a junior associate for Dinte “doing what she loves — research.”

2014

Kyle S. Bailey fought invasive plants prone to wildfires in Saguaro National Park, Arizona, with AmeriCorps, before returning to Ohio to become director of resource management for the Richland County Park District near his hometown of Shelby, Ohio.

2014

Patrick C. Brady moved to Hollywood, Florida, and entered the College of Law at Florida International University in Miami. This summer he interns for Judge William Turno‹ at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida.

2014

Samuel C. Ebert and three partners founded a bicycle company called Junto Cycle Works in Philadelphia, where he serves as executive and product manager/ designer. They will produce two to four models — primarily electric bicycles — with the first run available this October.

2014

Kathryn Gourley will attend the Harvard Graduate School of Design this fall to pursue a master’s in urban planning.

2014

Sean S. Grant Jr. informs us he is “working his way up the food chain” as director of dining at The Juilliard School and the School of American Ballet in Manhattan.

2014

Leland T. Holcomb finds himself in Bangalore, India. He works as an IDEX Global Fellow with Unitas Impact, an impact investment VC firm.

2014

Catherine M. Weitzel Krzeminski has made a home in southern Oregon’s gorgeous Rogue Valley. A records analyst on the clinical documentation team of the local hospital system, she will travel to Honduras and Nepal this year.

2014

Genevieve R. Malkin is a sales manager in Washington, D.C., at EverFi, “an educational technology company that empowers K-12, higher education and adult learners with the skills needed to be successful in life,” she updates. She works with — and sits diagonally across from — Jamar M. Chichester '14.

2014

Now in Lillehammer, Norway, Kristina Miklavic gets to eat dinner at home once a week and watch moose stroll by outside the living-room window. She recently presented some work from her nearly completed master’s thesis at a philosophy conference in Copenhagen.

2014

Rebecca E. Ogus, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, prepares to head off‹ to seminary in the fall to pursue an M.Div. and, eventually, ordination as an Episcopal priest. Meanwhile, she interns at a local church for some hands-on experience in parish ministry.

2014

Rafael Contreras Rangel works with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources as an aquatic invasive species specialist in conjunction with policymakers and local government. He will begin a master’s program in the fall.

2014

In November, Elizabeth A. “Lizzi” Whittlesey, Minneapolis, joined food and ag conglomerate Cargill as an internal communications specialist.

2015

Meredith E. Bentsen and Rebecca M. Dann have “planted the Kenyon flag on the Upper East Side,” they write, having “traded in mac-n-cheese wedges for late-night slices, and runs along the Gap Trail for jogs through Central Park.” Meredith works in corporate communications, while Becca “actually helps people” at NYU’s Langone Medical Center.

2015

Stephanie A. Cordonnier, Baltimore, researches Alzheimer’s disease at the NIH with Natalie P. Plick ’16 and tutors high school refugees through the Refugee Youth Project.

2015

Julia H. Greer works as Paula Vogel’s script assistant on “Indecent” on Broadway.

2015

Sarah C. Hobbs, Frisco, Texas, spends her free time playing in an otherwise all-male middle-aged basketball league.

2015

Ocean (previously Tim) Jurney works as an AmeriCorps VISTA member in Minneapolis with young people as they find their way back into life and community after being shot or stabbed.

2015

Lauren E. Katz is finishing her artistic apprenticeship at Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago.

2015

Madeline W. Lebar, in her first year of medical school at Tulane, serves as a clinic leader for tuberculosis testing at a student-run clinic and a chemistry tutor in a New Orleans underserved public high school.

2015

Colin J. McMahon conducts cardiology research at the University of Michigan, excited to remain in his hometown of Ann Arbor for medical school.

2015

Olubusola O. Olukoya is back into the lab doing “really cool” neurobiology research as a tech at Harvard Medical School. In her spare time while applying to medical schools, she “troubleshoots all her experiments, writes in her lab notebook, works on her application essays, and cries a lot about her MCAT score,” she reports.

2015

Mesa L. Owen moved to Redvale, Colorado, to work at Telluride Ski Resort as a manager and lead instructor for a kids’ program called Eco Adventures. She also bought a farm.

2015

Rachel J. Rhee will start medical school in July. “The Plant Journal” published her biochemistry work completed at Kenyon with Assistant Professor Kerry Rouhier.

2015

Josephine I.A. “Aisha” Simon moved to Portland, Maine, and works as a Spanish and English teacher at Coastal Studies for Girls, an alternative semester school in Freeport for 10th-grade girls focusing on marine science and leadership.

2015

Erich H. Slimak teaches a class of 11-year-olds in Brooklyn, where he lives with his better half, Edward G.H. Baxter '15. Erich has published poetry in The Santa Clara Review and POST(blank), an international literary and arts journal.

2015

Reagan K. Tsimakoko works in New York with the Gemological Institute of America, a gem grading company, and also serves as an ambassador of the NGO DiamondsDoGood.com, which campaigns to highlight positives stories within the diamond industry.

2016

Elise S. Altschuler, Greenwich, Connecticut, works as a third-grade associate teacher at an all-girls school while pursuing her master’s degree in education at Bank Street College of Education.

2016

Sarah K. Ash, Berkeley, California, started her first year of divinity school at the Jesuit School of Theology.

2016

Emma A. Estes works as a planning technician for the Department of Planning and Zoning of Fairfax County, Virginia, while comparing urban planning graduate programs.

2016

Hannah K. Ewing is hiking the Pacific Crest Trail as a fundraiser for Planned Parenthood. Afterward, she will begin a graduate nursing program in New York City, focusing on American Indian and Alaska Native women’s health.

2016

Lucy C. Iselin has taken up an apprenticeship on the San Juan Ranch in Colorado’s remote San Luis Valley, learning, she explains, “how to stitch together the gap between the tradition of western cattle ranching and the crucial nature of ensuring the future health of our land.”

2016

Logan T. Kohkol, Charlotte, North Carolina, works as an investment banking analyst with Wells Fargo.

2016

Alexander R. Oles, pursuing an M.D./Ph.D. at the Medical University of South Carolina, lives with fellow doctoral student Alexander S. McQuiston '16.

2016

Sruthi P. Rao reports: “Along with three current Kenyon seniors, I won a place in the regional final round of the Hult Prize, a $1 million award in seed capital for a social enterprise startup.” The Kenyon team was chosen from among 50,000 applicants to pitch their idea, called DOXA, a mobile platform that would facilitate learning and teaching in refugee communities.

2016

Jennifer J. Seely is a U.S. Forest Service park ranger in Juneau, Alaska, interpreting Mendenhall Glacier for visitors from across the globe.

2016

Manjul Bhusal Sharma, Chicago, works for Morningstar, learning about financial markets and publishing several market commentaries and articles at Yahoo! Finance.

2016

Nina M.O. Whittaker jumped into a sailboat after graduation and crossed the Atlantic from Massachusetts to Ireland, then south to Barcelona. She has since moved to the other end of the world, New Zealand, where she works at the Museum of Transport and Technology.

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