1950s

1952

Harris Shirakawa, Sharpes, Florida, writes that he is “alive and kicking.” He sees his old roomie Ross B. Haskell ’51 when he visits Florida.

1953

Donald B. Thomas appreciates each day at age 86, “when I was supposed to bite the dust when I was 61. So much for medical science. My doctor can’t believe I’m still around.”

1955

Philip H. Pitney enjoys living near his daughters and grandchildren. Despite suffering chronic Lyme disease, which limits his activities, he enjoyed Thanksgiving at the Hilton in New York City last year: “It was the first time I’d been at the parade — more fun than TV watching.”

1956

Charles M. Polk II sold his company, American Heritage, five years ago, and enjoys not having to work full time in his “not-so-golden years,” he reports. He now busies himself with travel, daily tennis matches, lunch with friends, good books and movies. “Always impressed with the continued ascent of Kenyon in all categories,” Charlie adds. “Miss the inspiring campus atmosphere.”

1957

William J. Wainwright recovered nicely from a major operation in January and is enjoying a new apartment at an independent-living facility a few blocks from Lake Michigan. When not working to complete his latest book on art, morality and religion, he takes in opera, ballet and art exhibits both near home and in Chicago: “All work and no play makes Bill a dull boy.”

1959

William Harley Henry writes that the octogenarian life in Grinnell, Iowa, is still a blessing, allowing him to play clarinet in the Prairie Jewel Dixieland Band and attend St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Harley’s daughter Astrid, who holds the endowed chair in women’s studies at Grinnell, has made “exceptional progress” since her severe stroke two years ago “thanks to inventive volunteers as well as a talented speech therapist.”

1960s

1960

J. Duncan Muir, Naples, Florida, joined the Friends board of Artis-Naples, comprising the Philharmonic League and the Baker Museum: “I will be working on the museum side,” he writes, “with emphasis on children’s programs, as that is my experience in arts volunteering.”

1960

The Rev. Wilson K. Roane is recovering from total shoulder-replacement surgery — his second. “Three grown children, doing well, and six grandchildren, one in grad school in Hawaii. You can tell by his choice of schools he has his grandpa’s intelligence.”

1961

John E. Baker retired his “sea legs” after more than 10 years on the flagship Niagara, a replica of the two-masted, square-rigged 1813 brig that aided Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry in the Battle of Lake Erie. John’s photography for the Niagara League “has appeared in calendars, history books, magazines and even a few shots in National Geographic,” he reports.

1961

David M. Johnson reports he is halfway through drafting his book “What Is Reason and Where Does It Come From?” which recommends that philosophers “use history to solve many of their problems.” The book is partly inspired by Kenyon classes he took with Professor Robert O. Fink.

1962

Paul C. Heintz was selected for inclusion in 2017 Pennsylvania Super Lawyers.

1962

Jonathan S. Katz and his wife, Yvette, are “enduring the Boston winters but will stay in New England, signified by the needed remodeling of the kitchen.” Jon switched his work focus last summer from communications satellite design to cybersecurity and cryptography.

1962

J. William Siniff and his wife, Roberta, have enjoyed 21 years of travel to every U.S. state and Canadian province since their retirement from public education. Active in their community and church, they now confine their sojourns to a winter month in Florida, a couple of summer weeks at a good friend’s Canadian cottage, and another in the fall with friends on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

1963

John M. Ackermann announces the birth of a granddaughter, who joins her 2-year-old brother in the family of his stepson, whose wedding required his regrettable absence from the 50th reunion. After work as an ecology professor at universities in California, Kansas, and finally Fiji, John spent 20 years with the U.S. EPA’s Air Program in North Carolina and Georgia, where he and his wife, a teacher, have retired to a house in the woods.

1963

John L. Ross lives in Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin, where he is retired and “doing some light volunteer work.”

1963

William K. Woods returned to cold Cincinnati from southern California, where his wife, Carol, spoke at the American Montessori Conference in San Diego; they reserved a few days for relaxing at Laguna Beach. At Applied Information Resources, “the nonprofit community research outfit I started in 1981,” he reports, “we just received a grant to work on congressional redistricting reform in Ohio — long overdue.”

1964

Henry S. Pool and his wife, Linda, purchased a new home in Bonita Springs, Florida, after Hank’s retirement from 49 years practicing law. They plan to spend most of the year on the Gulf Coast while selling their home in Pittsburgh and determining what, if any, type of place they want when traveling back to visit family and friends.

1965

Peter E. Hewitt and his wife, Aileen, spend nine months a year in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where they are very involved in the “fantastic” local farm and foodie scene. In Brooklin, Maine, at their unwinterized 1903 cottage overlooking Center Harbor, they’ve welcomed Richard F. Spinner ’63 and several Connecticut friends arriving by sailboat.

1965

Gene E. Little reports things are quiet in Canton, Ohio, except during Pro Football Hall of Fame Week, adding, “Sally and I are looking forward to our sixth Vermont Bicycle Tour vacation this summer (Holland and Belgium) and welcome any ’65ers to join us.”

1965

John A. Lynn reports that upon the three-year mark since his 2014 diagnosis of Stage 4 bone marrow lymphoma and a dire prognosis, he is holding his own by virtue of prayer, twice-a-week naturopathic IVs, a variety of plant-based supplements, a few blood transfusions and lots of organic food.

1965

“I have been expanding my ministry at Episcopal Retirement Services and taking a course over three weekends at Chicago’s Bexley-Seabury Seminary called Strategies for Teaching the Bible. By the time you see this, my new collection, ‘Recycled Glass and Other Stories,’ will be available at bookstores and online.”

Frederick J. McGavran, Cincinnati

1966

Robert P. Moyer, a poet and theater artist at the K-8 Arts Based School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, writes: “I just finished coaxing haiku out of 50 seventh-graders for a book project with former Kenyon prof Terry Schupbach-Gordon, and coaching 50 fifth-graders on the art of Shakespearean insults. (In March) I had the thrill of joining the current Kenyon Chamber Singers for their encore of ‘Kokosing.’ Life is good.”

1966

William P. Rice finds time when not managing his company (anchorcapital.com) to cruise the New England coast in the summer and enjoy Key Largo in winter. While entertaining clients in Naples, Florida, Bill caught up with classmate and chef Anthony W. Ridgway '66 at Ridgway Bar and Grill, which “serves terrific food in a charming location; I recommend that alumni take a road trip.”

1967

Markham P. Stevenson reports: “Greetings to all old Kenyon friends. I have been living in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada, for 40 years, having immigrated first in ’68 and then again in ’72 after completing my CO alternative service in Oakland, California.” Markham was a video and photo media technician at the Algoma University College library for 33 years. He has three children with his wife, Mary-Lou Morassut.

1968

C. Stephen Hayes, happily wintering with wife Sherry in Vero Beach, Florida, for 10 years, enjoys watching Lords baseball during their spring trips to Fort Pierce for the chance to live “ vicariously through these young athletes and remember great times with my old teammates.” Steve and brother Jeffrey W. Hayes ’72 sold their business in 2000. Since then, Steve has served on many boards, including that of the Therapeutic Riding Institute, which offers mentally and physically challenged people experiences in the horse saddle to improve their lives.

1968

Thomas Arthur Hensley proudly describes his “third marriage young’uns (ages 12 and 6)” as academic stars — the elder “twice the athlete I was at that age,” the younger “developing on a par.” He and wife Melissa Giordano live a “good life” in Raynham, Massachusetts — “not bad for a kid originally from Berea and Scaffold Cane, Kentucky.”

1968

Frank Svec and his wife, Carol Poyar, sold their New Orleans house and moved to Las Vegas, trading “damp heat for dry heat,” he reports. “However, our new condo is in one of the few places with trees, green grass and a small lake. We moved to get away from state income taxes and a little closer to our younger son, who is a hospitalist at Stanford.”

1969

Dana B. “Brad” Story retired from wooden boatbuilding and has been making sculpture — “with modest success; see my work at bradstory.com.”

1970s

1970

Jim Nininger attended his 50th high school reunion in Briarcliff Manor, New York, with Byard Clemmons '70. He also led the spring song in the 50th Anniversary Concert during Reunion Weekend.

1970

John I. “Jack” Turnbull II and his wife, Jane, spent three weeks in New Zealand — “a life-long dream,” he writes. “Beautiful scenery and very friendly Kiwis!”

1971

George S. Deepe Jr. received the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine’s highest honor, the Daniel Drake Medal. A professor of internal medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, George has pioneered investigations into the role of zinc in host immune response resistance to fungal diseases.

1971

Mark K. Straley, Tampa, Florida, enjoyed daughter Catharine E. Straley ’17’s graduation in May, writing, “It’s hard to believe it has been nearly 50 years since I first arrived in Gambier in the fall of 1967!”

1971

Preston F. Zoller retired from his nutrition business. He will soon have his sixth novel, “Maid of Baikal,” published on Amazon under the pen name Preston Fleming (his middle name).

1972

“If anybody had told me back in ’72 that I’d still be playing ‘Whole Lotta Love’ and actually enjoying it … This band from Connecticut found me in Northampton, Massachusetts, and I’m celebrating my second year with them. Just a bar band, but lots of work and enough money that I have to think about how to report it at tax time.”

David B. Erickson

1973

Hugh McElrath wrote from an orthopedic hospital in Kathmandu. He feels fortunate that his crash in Nepal followed rather than preceded his hang-gliding off Glacier Peak in Yosemite, paragliding in Austria, and bicycling and trekking Italy, the Philippines and Vietnam. “At 66,” he concludes, “I am retiring from foot-launched aviation and will stick to my motorglider.”

1973

Peter W. Schneeberger and his wife, Rory, have been volunteering around the world since retiring from the U.S. Postal Service in 2006. “I can’t do as much construction work now,” Pete writes, “so have been coaching basketball in the Tlingit Indian village of Hoonah, Alaska, where we live now. If fishing out of a sailboat jazzes you up, let me know.”

1974

Dan E. Patterson stepped down after 25 years with the private equity firm he founded but will remain chair of the investment committee for four years — “or longer, if they will have me,” he adds. “Very fond memories of dear old Kenyon.”

1974

Peter Smagorinsky received the 2017 University of Georgia College of Education Aderhold Distinguished Professor Award for his contributions to teaching, research and service to the college.

1975

David P. Culp celebrated in March the first anniversary of his open-heart surgery, which coincided with his long-planned retirement after 33 years in the tax department of KPMG. Now in “the best shape of (his) life” thanks to serious workouts, he and Katherine R. (Stewart) Culp ’76 are heavily involved in social justice issues in their Unitarian Universalist congregation and are expanding the range of their explorations to New Orleans and Scotland.

1975

“I am sitting in a Starbucks in Nassau, Bahamas, writing my note. We are still living on a 42-foot catamaran and are in our fifth year. It’s mostly wonderful unless you happen to be stuck at a dock for three weeks with engine issues. Our youngest, Ann C. Kelly ’12, went to Kenyon, and I do miss going back to watch the Ladies play lax. But I really shouldn’t complain, because the view from our boat is always beautiful.”

Elizabeth D. Kelly

1975

J. David Mabry has worked for Chrysler since 1976. “Retirement is probably less than a year out,” he reports. “My three kids are all independent, no grandchildren. Spend my free time pursuing hobbies of rescue scuba diving for boat races, running and shooting sports.”

1976

James C. Fenhagen’s news is the graduation of his son Aaron Fenhagen ’17. “We can’t believe it went by so fast,” he adds, “but it has been really nice being connected to the college again. Meanwhile, I am working on many projects involving set design for TV shows in N.Y.C., L.A., London and China. I stay in touch with Peter H. Frank ’75, Irving J. Gotbaum ’75, Seth L. Frechie '76 and Susan Norman '76.”

1976

David B. Hutchinson describes working as a docent at the Crocker Art Museum as “an education for the senses and the mind, so that things in the world speak to me with a new voice. We discuss Ai Wei Wei, impressionism, master drawings, ancient Chinese burial figures, Apache sculpture … a heady mix of history, biography and creativity.”

1976

Corbin D. Riemer works for a venture-backed health technology company consulting with clients nationwide. “I am the oldest person in the company by about 20 years,” he reports, “and consider myself a millennial trapped in a boomer body.” Corby and Sherry often see their blended families, including two grandchildren, and cycle, travel and go fly-fishing.

1976

Anne L. Sherwood works as a director of scientific affairs with The Binding Site Inc., an immunodiagnostics firm covering 17 U.S. states. While she travels, husband Peter, retired, can look after their animals. “Wonderful to see so many friends at last year’s reunion.”

1977

Jerome Mindes parted ways after a decade with his nonprofit organization and reports he is “reinventing myself at a time when there may be less interest in the intersection of human rights and foreign aid, at least from public funding.” Jerry’s goals are “to continue to contribute to positive change, to cook great meals, read interesting novels and stay limber enough to play Ultimate Frisbee a couple of times a week.”

1977

Michael Schmidtmann, a business coach and professional speaker on information technology, recalled how he put his Kenyon education to immediate use by buying a bar and hotel in northwestern Maine. After spending many years in “disreputable professions,” he writes, he found a home in IT — and on a horse farm in Warrenton, Virginia, where he lives with “assorted kids and animals.”

1978

“After a career spent toggling between journalism and conservation sciences I’ve finally left the comforts of employment with benefits and hung out my shingle as a freelance journalist at BobMooreFieldNotes.com. It’s exciting and a bit crazy, but that’s what 30 Maine winters will do to you.”

Robert M. Moore, Freeport, Maine

1978

Amy F. Saunders is happy to announce the expansion of her clinic, Integrative Healthcare Providers. “We now have two M.D.’s who provide primary care,” she writes, “a D.O. who does manual medicine, a naturopath, an acupuncturist, a massage therapist and a social worker, all working together with a shared, dedicated administrative staff. Surviving independently in a primary-care practice is possible!”

1978

“Currently battling cancer — and winning.”

E. David Staveley, Loveland, Colorado

1980s

1980

Nelson Roe reports he was recently let go after long-tenured employment with a cable company but finds it “not too bad, really; reassessing, reinventing.” His son, Ellis, just completed his M.B.A. from Rollins College.

1981

Merrill Robinson Peterson retired from her fashion sales business: “Time for something new — not sure of my direction yet!” Her son Conrad was married in May, with son Cameron serving as the best man; both of them live in Chicago.

1981

Donald L. Shupe Jr. reports that his North Carolina license plate reading “KENYON81” occasionally sparks a conversation with a fellow alum. “In March,” he recounts, “parking at the YMCA before a workout, I was approached by an incredibly affable guy a few years my senior. Turns out it was Jack R. Forgrave ’78, former QB of the football team who tragically lost all of his fingers early in his career and became Kenyon’s punter. He’s a dynamo, even in his early ’60s. Living in Raleigh-Durham, we see more and more folks from the Midwest and Northeast, an increasing number of them aware of Kenyon.”

1982

Katherine Bergin Dreyer lives in Asheville, North Carolina, with husband Danny and 17-year-old daughter Journey. Together, the couple wrote and published three books with Simon & Schuster: “ChiRunning,” “ChiWalking” and “ChiMarathon,” with a fourth — “ChiLiving” — on the way. She has a personal and business coaching practice and is an astrologer.

1982

Marvin F. Ewy, Terrell, North Carolina, now deploys the skills gained during his 25 years as a surgeon providing wound care for a company called VOHRA: “I can be as busy as I want,” he explains. “No night or weekend call to cover, and I can keep my mind occupied and earn a decent income at a slower pace for the next 15 years or so. Very happy in a second marriage of five years, all of the six children healthy and out of the house; enjoying being empty nesters.”

1982

Susanne Waugh Greeves, her husband, and 15-year-old daughter have lived in Sydney, Australia, for 15 years.

1982

Joseph "Gregg" Parini, Granville, Ohio, writes: "Getting old has its benefits as we watch our six sons leading productive and useful lives around the world. With sons overseas (Fiji) and far away (Montana) while others serve in the military (Army, Air Force), we covet the time remaining with our 12-year-old. It’s been a bittersweet thing watching our boys grow into men. Couldn’t be prouder."

1983

Amy Brill greets us from Asia: “Finishing a contract in Chiang Mai, Thailand, hoping for Hong Kong or Europe next year. The alarming reality is that I have already ‘aged out’ in several countries and am approaching it in many others — sad news slightly offset by all the senior discounts I now receive.” Amy recently hosted visits from Amy McCloskey '83 and the uncle of Pamela J. Pleasants '83.

1983

Charlotte P. Wood now works for Family Giving Tree, a San Francisco Bay Area nonprofit where she is responsible for community marketing and public outreach. “I feel blessed to have a job I love,” she writes, “annually granting 100,000 children’s wishes for joy and learning.”

1983

George H. Carroll, Needham, Massachusetts, joined son Macpherson C. Carroll ’11 and Prita P. Kidder ’11 for alpine skiing in Franconia, New Hampshire, last September. George’s toddler son Warren — class of 2036? — also hit the slopes with them for his first day on skis, which transpired in the same relative location where George learned to ski in 1965.

1984

Kris Kennard Caldwell swims on the Kenyon Masters team and invites others to join: “Since we are spread out across the country we don’t train together, but we’ll come together as a team for regional or national meets,” such as the U.S. Masters Nationals, which were in August in Minneapolis.

1984

Jeffrey J. Webster celebrated 30 years at TG, a nonprofit that promotes college affordability, where he is director of research and leads numerous studies on college success and student debt. Currently collaborating with the Federal Reserve Board on a study of student loan counseling, he lives with longtime partner Susan Van Haitsma, an artist, writer and peace activist, with whom he enjoys live music, bicycling and breakfast tacos.

1984

James R. Whittum, a board-certified orthopedic physician, joined the practice of Southwestern Vermont Medical Center, where he will help grow its orthopedic group managing sports injuries, arthroscopic surgery, arthritis care and joint replacement.

1985

Brian J. Edwards was named to Barron’s list of America’s Top 1,200 Financial Advisors for his outstanding work in a Morgan Stanley wealth management office on the northeast side of Columbus.

1985

Alfred G. Naddaff writes: “After a two-year assignment in Houston helping an Italian restaurant concept expand through franchising in the United States and Middle East, I am back in my hometown of Dedham, Massachusetts.” His son A.J., a sophomore at Davidson, will spend next year abroad in the Middle East; daughter Alexandra is a freshman at St. Lawrence.

1986

Thomas L. Tobin began his fifth year with his development consulting business, advising such clients as the American Council for the Blind. Tom also finds his work on behalf of the Blinded Veterans Association, helping it to generate revenue, “gratifying and rewarding.”

1988

cdavid cottrill of Portland, Oregon, teases: “My better half, Collette, is in prison, but luckily she gets out each day at 4:30 from her job as a mental health counselor at Coffee Creek Women’s Correctional Facility.” After 114 episodes over six years, he has put the NBC program “Grimm” to bed and is busy representing studio mechanics of the Northwest as vice president of his IATSE local. “I love seeing David P. Diggdon '88 and his family in Seattle whenever I can,” he adds.

1989

Amy Curtner Andrews writes: "After eight years as a full-time parent (and tireless school volunteer!), I’ve recently returned to full-time law practice and am enjoying being back in the professional world. We keep busy in Chicago with the many sporting activities — soccer, basketball, lacrosse — of our kids, ages 15 and 13."

1989

Brenda W. Burman has been nominated by President Donald Trump to be the commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation. Currently director of water strategy for Arizona’s Salt River Project (the Phoenix area’s major electric utility), Brenda would oversee the bureau’s 5,000 employees, who manage more than 800 dams and reservoirs in 17 Western states, providing farmers with irrigation water and consumers with about 15 percent of the nation’s hydroelectric power. If confirmed, Brenda would become the first woman to lead the bureau.

1990s

1991

Christopher Kaufman Ilstrup joined the leadership team at VTDigger.org, “Vermont’s nitty-gritty, online, people-powered, nonprofit news outlet,” he writes, “now Vermont’s largest newsroom. The position melds my commitment to Vermont with a real opportunity to help impact civic discourse at a time when we need ‘real news’ more than ever.”

1991

Amie R. Graves Swope resigned her high school teaching position after 24 years to become the Norwalk City Schools’ district technology director.

1991

Holly Brent Thyen, Wexford, Pennsylvania, updates: "I have been keeping busy running our three boys around to soccer and musical theater classes. I have also started creative writing classes!"

1992

Stephen J. Corley, “a born Seattle boy,” he writes, “has convinced Sara after 17 years here that it is the only place to be — as long as there’s a yearly visit back to Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.” He continues his job at JSH Properties and spends his extra time on the lacrosse field as a referee. Sara left Microsoft to be home with their three daughters but now works for the Bezos Family Foundation.

1993

Amy King Schindler became director of operations for the Power2Change Foundation, where she orchestrates the development of the Youth Leadership Institute on the campus of Eastern Michigan University.

1994

William R. Enloe is now a planned giving officer at Floyd Healthcare Foundation in Rome, Georgia, assisting donors with estate planning and other deferred giving methods.

1994

James K. Feuer has been getting speaking roles in “A Crime to Remember” and Twentieth Century Fox’s “Antonio in Wonderland” but seeks an agent. He’s also a freelance presentation coach in New York, specializing in eliminating the fear of public speaking.

1995

Federico A. Ceppa was appointed director of primary care at La Comunidad Hispana, helping low-income families in southeastern Pennsylvania stay healthy. Fred’s “ten years as a surgeon, bilingual skills, and diverse experience are true assets,” the president of his health center noted.

1995

Katharine B. Sears graduated from the U.S. Naval War College with a master’s in national security and strategic studies and relocated to Tampa, Florida, in 2016. She now works as the lessons learned branch chief in the Joint Directorate for Special Operations Force Development at U.S. Special Operations Command, located on MacDill Air Force Base.

1996

Douglas A. Trafelet, his wife, Elizabeth, and three kids have lived in London, England, for the past eight years. While running a “mud larking” club on the Thames, Doug “found treasures including a Victorian shoe, musket ball tweezer (we had to give that back to the Crown), and a 16th-century Bellarmine jug neck.”

1997

Jeffrey R. Romph became an owner and managing partner of marketing firm Gremillion and Pou, which rebranded as Romph Pou Agency this summer.

1997

Kenyon A. Warren was appointed senior vice president, head of retail banking, at TBS Bank, where he will oversee its 37 branches across the middle west.

1998

Yuxin “Cindy” Chen is “still Heavenly Master of Jade Dawn of Golden Door: The position is actually government economist and politician combined.” She has been at Jade Dawn since August 2006.

1998

Jack Dreher has pursued studies in various religious traditions, multiple shamanic systems, traditional folk magic and the occult with the goal of opening “a private practice to counsel people who have undergone spiritually transformative experiences that mainstream psychotherapy does not recognize,” he reports. Embarking on a master’s in clinical counseling and therapy at Vanderbilt, he currently works as a professional psychic, medium and spirit channel.

1998

Heather Osborn continues to enjoy urban farm life on two acres in Sacramento, California, with fiancé John Hunter, three boys, 21 chickens, a dog, several thousand bees, a snake and one rescued rat (rejected snake food). A science editor, Heather volunteers to support refugees, organize river cleanups and advocate for truth and democracy.

1999

Carolyn Priemer Harrison co-founded Cleveland Culinary Launch and Kitchen, “a shared kitchen and business incubator for food entrepreneurs,” in 2013. She has since married and had her first child, a daughter.

1999

David C. Schalliol, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, is earning national recognition for his work on urban architectural innovation and social responsibility. Dave’s feature-length film “The Area,” documenting the demolition of a South Side Chicago neighborhood, won him a place this year in the Independent Filmmaker Project Documentary Labs and the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

2000s

2000

Renee Peltz Dennison is an associate professor of psychology at St. Mary’s College of Maryland. She and James Dennison ’99, now married for 13 years, have two sons. They welcome classmates visiting the Baltimore/D.C. area.

2000

Sheryl A. Yeomans Jordan relocated from Brooklyn to New Jersey when second daughter Anne was born in May 2016. She continues her independent architecture practice.

2000

Rachel I. Leber, a freelance writer in Boulder, Colorado, covers “about anything (on) health, nutrition, growth, health and sustainability.” Her career path so far has taken her through being a massage therapist, yoga teacher, elementary school teacher and social worker. When not quietly writing she sings in a samba group and plays samba percussion.

2001

Erika Plank Hagan, Ridgefield, Connecticut, writes: "I went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in October 2016 — an amazing experience. I was able to impress our guide by reading the ancient Greek in the first-century mosaics. Thanks, Kenyon Classics Department!"

2001

Andrew W. Kahrl received tenure and was promoted to associate professor in the department of history at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where he lives with wife Aileen M. Sevier ’02 and their two daughters. Next spring, Yale University Press will publish Andrew’s second book, “War for the Shore: Wealth, Poverty, and the Privatization of Public Space in America’s Most Unequal State.”

2001

Ian P. Malone won a Forty Under 40 award from North Bay Business Journal for his work advising investors in wineries and other companies at Aspect Consumer Partners of St. Helena.

2002

At Sinai Hospital in Baltimore, Sarah A. Eby is medical director of the inpatient acute neurological rehabilitation unit, caring for patients after strokes and spine and brain injuries. She and Eric have two young daughters.

2002

Brooke Roeper Hohman and her husband, Joe, welcomed a baby girl, Adelaide Anne, in April 2016.

2003

Meghan E. Burnett, in publishing in Philadelphia, reports: “My husband, Matthew, and I share our home with a delightful rowdy dog and a delightful rowdy toddler named Louisa.”

2003

Sarah Steckel, Tacoma, Washington, writes: "I’m happy to report I’ve started working in my new field of occupational therapy. I finished my degree in December and passed my boards in March. I couldn’t be more excited about starting this next chapter!"

2004

Daniel S. Scharff moved to San Francisco for a job with Hampton Creek, a food technology startup, as its director of pricing. Read his insights on his blog, “Consumer Led Pricing.”

2005

Amy L. (Gross) Gestal, Boulder, Colorado, muses: "Since graduation, I questioned the value of my liberal arts education. Working in finance, I saw no direct correlation to how (it) is helping me, (yet) recently I have begun to see it. Kenyon taught me to listen to others, create my own ideas, and then clearly share them with my community. It sounds so simple, but surprisingly — at least from my experience — continues to be a challenge for me and others in my community. Very curious what you all are experiencing. Bleeding purple."

2006

Oliver J. Batchelor works as a reference and instruction librarian at Arapahoe Community College.

2006

Robert J. Peach updates that he has been working as a chef at the upscale grocery the Fresh Market in Indianapolis.

2006

Benjamin A. Tuck is a high school Chinese teacher in Annapolis, Maryland.

2006

Whitney A. Bratton Vendt and husband Daniel celebrated the arrival of son Martin Geoffrey on tax day this year. If you’re near Reseda, California, they’d love to introduce you to him.

2007

Willow A. Belden hired a marketing and business development director for her podcast, “Out There,” now that its listenership has quadrupled, becoming the No. 1 outdoors podcast on iTunes. It has been featured by Outside magazine and The Pulse from WHYY.

2007

Jessie Wohlgemuth Cintron and her husband bought a house in the New York suburbs, though she will miss Brooklyn. But not having a washer and dryer that she shares with all her neighbors will be a plus.

2007

Katharine L. Bente Knarreborg and her husband, Nathan, moved from Pennsylvania to the suburbs of Denver in Highlands Ranch, Colorado. “We are enjoying our home’s proximity to the Rocky Mountains,” she reports. She still runs Merlin Instrument Co., which also will relocate to Denver.

2007

Sarah E. Ryan serves on the board of the McIlvaine Fund, which supports a Christian campus ministry at Kenyon.

2007

John W. Steele IV and Lauren Zenner Steele '07 welcomed a son, Ansel, to the family in March. They now live, work and “enjoy the great outdoors” in Humboldt County, California.

2008

Alexander C. Kerr works as director of strategy and research for Monumental Sports and Entertainment, comprising the NHL’s Washington Capitals, NBA’s Washington Wizards and more. Alex also helps David M. Driscoll '08 run the DC Jacks, the official U.S.A. supporters group for the English Premier League soccer club Swansea City AFC: “All are welcome to join watch parties!”

2008

Brian K. Kettler saw his new play, “Poor Boys’ Chorus,” make its world premiere headlining the Broadway Bound Theatre Festival’s inaugural season in New York City, where it was performed in August.

2008

Michael J. Northcutt moved to the University of Chicago-North Shore on July 1 to begin a gastroenterology fellowship.

2009

Johanna Ralsten-Cox and Justin M. Cox '09 live in South Miami, where Johanna works as ministries director for Miami Youth for Christ and Justin teaches at Design and Architecture Senior High School.

2009

Eric M. Dunn moved to Tomah, Wisconsin, where he continues to teach performance-enhancing and resilience-building mental skills. Now a contractor with the National Guard, he hopes to sell or lease his new program exclusively to them.

2009

Maika C. Lindsay invites everyone to visit the incredible land of Pandora: World of Avatar at Disney’s Animal Kingdom at Walt Disney World Resort. It’s a project she worked on for almost three years.

2010s

2010

Halcyon B.K. Roberts Paulson will leave her inner-city classroom after six years of teaching. During that time, Hally has been “leading her current school toward a trauma-informed school model.” She plans now “to pursue teacher coaching, trauma-informed school implementation, or something completely new. Scary, but exciting and freeing!”

2010

Daniel W. Streicher is entrepreneur-in-residence at the Latin School of Chicago and CEO of React Learning. His company’s software facilitates educational role-playing and works with Code.org and the International Computer Science Institute on a “very cool simulation to teach the global impact of concepts like big data and cloud computing,” he reports.

2010

Samantha M. Turner moved back to Gambier and will pursue a career in performing arts in Columbus.

2011

Susanna N. Byrd works as the marketing and outreach assistant at Montfair Resort Farm. “Also,” she adds, “for y’all about to get hitched, a friend and I launched a business selling handmade watercolor wedding invitations and stationery: Moose and Luna Designs (find us on Facebook and Etsy).”

2011

“Ciao Tutti! Jonathan ‘Fatty’ Fasano is still living and working in D.C., for the Italian spirits producer Don Ciccio & Figli. Helping create a lineup of traditional aperitivi, cordials and amari, he now travels the U.S., promoting DCF’s products and brand. Follow him at @doncicciofigli and @fasafoto to connect when he might be in your city!”

Jonathan L. Fasano

2011

Chauncey R. Harrison lives in what’s been “lovingly dubbed the Kenyon halfway house” in south Williamsburg. Chauncey teaches yoga and does dance/movement therapy with high-risk youth and cancer patients.

2011

Bryn T. Stole has been named the Washington, D.C., correspondent for The Advocate, Louisiana’s only newspaper with a full-time staff member covering the nation’s capital. In 2016, he covered Baton Rouge-area flooding and police shootings for the paper.

2011

Jonathan Weil married Elizabeth Lawner in May. In June, Jon completed his fourth year as a medical student at Georgetown University and began a residency in emergency medicine at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

2012

Carolyn A. “Caddie” Durrett works in Helsinki, Finland, for a health care software company as its requirements and translation manager. “Visit me if you’re into salmon, blondes and saunas!”

2012

Chelsea L. Farco is general manager and assistant coffee roaster of a specialty coffee company in Huntington, New York, and recently traveled to Costa Rica on her first coffee-sourcing trip to coordinate direct trade agreements with coffee farmers.

2012

Simon G. White relocated from Burlington, Vermont, to Dartmouth, Massachusetts, where he will “pursue new professional horizons in the world of special-interest magazines,” he writes. Titles on which he will consult include Civil War Monitor, Alpinist and Adirondack Life.

2013

Jacob M. Fishbein reports he “is co-founding a vinyl of the month club curated by iconic musicians (think Sir Elton John, Carlos Santana, Quincy Jones, George Clinton, Sean Lennon) and is co-authoring a novel with a former career coach on personal and societal transformation and the difference men can make in the world when they’re authentic and purposeful.”

2013

John T. “Jack” Krzeminski lives in Ashland, Oregon. A general manager of Wilderness Poets Transcendental Foods, he walks his pug, Huckleberry, every day and most times his kitty, Seva, tags along.

2013

Melissa K. Nigro continues her graphic design and photography work with Bay Area Children’s Theatre. “The highlight of this year,” she reports, “was definitely the Baby Rave. Toddlers plus glow sticks plus a live DJ equals magic.”

2014

Samuel E. Kaplan, after two years at Memorial Sloan Kettering, was published in Current Infectious Disease Reports, the Journal of Visualized Experiments and Clinical Infectious Diseases. Sam was “forced to part ways,” he writes, “with roommates and collaborators William W. Harrison '14 and Caroline L. Hesse '14 due to irreconciliable differences over what constitutes ‘excessive’ midnight plyometrics and horticultural experimentation.” A side project of his made the short list, but sadly did not win the grand prize, of a BoatUS Foundation Life Jacket Design competition.

2014

Andrea M. Odegaard explores medieval theology in the master’s in theological studies program at the University of Notre Dame, with plans to apply for the Ph.D. next fall.

2014

William E. Quam reports that he “teaches theatre to children and takes pictures of bricks as Brick of Chicago (on Instagram).”

2014

Montreaux A. Rodgers is a big-data scientist at Elsevier, about to pursue a master’s in computer and information technology.

2014

“Graphic designer by day, jewelry designer by night. I’m in the process of launching my own jewelry brand called bdlighted — simultaneously the most challenging and wonderful thing I’ve ever done!”

Bethany J. Stephens, Leesburg, Virginia

2014

Aaron J. Stone finished his second year as a doctoral student in English language and literature at the University of Michigan and enjoyed “a restful summer studying for prelims and hanging out in Ann Arbor with my upstairs neighbor/housemate Ellen D. Blanchard ’12.”

2015

Javier Leung has lived in Helsinki, Finland, for two years, working so far as a farmhand, hotel cleaner, busker and attempted digital startup entrepreneur. He now works on the software team of a business events company, plays guitar at jazz gigs around the city and studies software engineering part-time — “College is free in Finland!” he adds. Jay and Benjamin C. Golombek (originally part of Kenyon ’15, later transferred) took an epic journey together through Estonia and Sweden to the fjords of western Norway.

2015

Alisa R. Rethy studies for her master’s in comparative literature at Freie Universität in Berlin, Germany, while also working as a translator for American Jewish Archive.

2015

Erich H. Slimak writes that he is amazed to have been put in charge of a classroom of 11-year-olds. He lives in East Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with “his better half,” Edward G.H. Baxter '15.

2016

Christina E. Franzino has been named assistant director for sexual assault prevention and response at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

2016

Liam C. Leonard-Solis has explored “the majestic mountains of Montana” and now splits his time “between being a pasta salesman at a local Italian restaurant and wandering the forests of northern Massachusetts.”

2016

Olivia J. Lloyd writes: “Four years ago I traded my California flip-flops and kale salads for bean boots and cornfields in Ohio, a transition that encouraged me to seek out perspectives different from my own.” For now, she has landed at ad agency Ogilvy & Mather in London, England, where “pants” means underwear, tea is mandatory multiple times a day and “No one knows what strep throat is.”

2016

Zachary D. Sawicki lives in Columbus, Ohio, while working on developing commercial-scale solar energy projects in Washington, D.C.

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