1930s

1939

William M. Donley, Pepper Pike, Ohio, writes that he “made it to 101.” He had lunch in late October in Gambier at the Kenyon Inn.

1940s

1946

Richard H. Timberlake Jr., Bogart, Georgia, who notes that his “actual or initial year would be 1943,” has written four books and about 15 professional articles since 1990.

1948

Ira I. Eliasoph, White Plains, New York, still operates and teaches oculoplastic surgery at his local VA hospital. He received this year’s Alumni Special Recognition Award from the Mount Sinai Hospital Alumni. He’s still reading and writing about ophthalmology and — in warmer weather — playing tennis. “It seems that I am one of the oldest alums,” Ira adds.

1950s

1952

“I have just reached my 87th birthday and am still going strong. Of course there are a few bumps in the road, but I am succeeding to surpass these. I volunteer at the local hospital in the cancer unit encouraging other patients and am still professor on the Yale faculty and senior adviser of the Yale Bahamas Eye Program. I keep active in the local YMCA men’s meeting. I still think of the excellent non-science courses at Kenyon and regret I had too little time to take more of them. Best regards to all.”

I. Willard “Brook” Abrahams, Meriden, Connecticut

1953

James E. Klosterman spent winter around home in Siloam Springs, Arkansas, missing his usual months in Tucson. “Still vertical and doing well,” he adds. “Trust all the 1953-era guys are doing well, too. Count your blessings!”

1953

Ronald R. Ryan reports that he and Mig remain healthy and active, golfing twice a week, playing tennis two or three times a week, and volunteering one afternoon a week at the Medical Center in Jupiter, Florida. They hope to visit their children in Washington, Virginia and New York this summer.

1953

Richard L. Thomas, still splitting time between Naples, Florida, and Winnetka, Illinois, experienced an impromptu mini-reunion before a round of golf at Hole-in-the-Wall Country Club in early March: “While waiting for my guest, Scott A. Kerth ’85, I ran into Bruce W. Duncan ’73; shortly thereafter James P. Gretz ’21 came by for a brief visit. How likely is it that four members of the Kenyon community would have unplanned visits in Naples, Florida, within a 30-minute period!”

1954

“Dust off the speech ‘The Case for Conservation’ by Raymond English made in the 50-54 presentation at Rosse Hall. Fantastic ovation.”

J. Barry Cahill, Richmond, Texas

1955

Arthur L. Johnson, Potsdam, New York, continues to have fun writing, directing and acting in dinner murder plays as fundraisers. Art also lectures in a program for retirees, SOAR at SUNY-Potsdam, this spring on Canada in World War II and World War II: Home Front Memories. “I’m not going gentle into that good night.”

1955

Philip H. Pitney made the most of his 2017 weekends away from Philly to Greenwich: “We see my late brother Peyt’s girls quite often; they hail from Gettysburg and San Francisco. Love those Kenyon calendars.”

1955

Edward T. Rhodes Sr., Silver Spring, Maryland, welcomed John L. Clark '55 on his annual trek to Sarasota. With their spouses they enjoyed several plays at the Mertz Theater and supper with Nancy Leach, widow of Lewis C. Leach '55.

1956

John R. Coban updates that he is “aging gracefully with the kind assistance of Medicare” in Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan.

1956

Charles M. Polk II is overcoming anemia, kidney failure and dehydration and now returning to good health with the goal of resuming competitive tennis. “Thus far, these golden years are not as uplifting as advertised,” Charlie writes. “I’ll be visiting Robert W. Rowe '56 in Sarasota in October. All calls from classmates to me in St. Louis are welcome.”

1957

I. Kelman Cohen updates that he “made it to 83 and continues to dodge health bullets.” He is still working on grant research and downsizing his home, with a bit of travel in store as well. He welcomes visits from classmates who are anywhere near Richmond, Virginia.

1957

“Kenyon College administration and faculty repeatedly emphasized that a good liberal education would serve you well during retirement years. Thirty-one years after retiring from active medical practice, I can affirm Kenyon’s promise. I have experienced two bouts of boredom. Each lasted about 20 minutes.”

Dale C. Havre, Inverness, Florida

1958

Richard Arkless, Seabeck, Washington, is still swimming, biking and annually snorkeling the coral reefs of Indonesia (the Wakatobi Islands).

1958

Andrew R. Graham “blew an Achilles tendon while cavorting with my grandchildren” last summer, he writes, but his work with his wife helping Karen refugees assimilate to the Buffalo, New York, community continues. “These wonderful people who arrived from camps in Thailand to which they escaped from Burma face an overwhelming array of complexities with paperwork, dietary adjustment and translation.” He and Ann will take their classic Cape Dory 25 out for day sailing on Lake Erie, and Andy just completed 30 years of main sheet trimming as a crew member on a Pearson Flyer in the Buffalo Harbor Sailing Club weekly races.

1958

Dale A. Neuman has now lived over six months in Blue Hill, Maine, thoroughly enjoying life among new friends at his independent living community there. He sings in several choral groups including the Gilbert and Sullivan Society of Maine, is a member of his community’s poetry and writing groups, and presents programs to other residents involving digital designs from original photos. Relocation allows him to visit his daughter several times a month instead of once a year — “so life is fine and I am well!”

1959

“Last summer we enjoyed taking our 11-year-old grandson, Jakob, to a weeklong Grand Canyon program and two days in Las Vegas. The Grand Canyon experience is offered by ‘Road Scholar’ and includes exploration in the western canyon, rafting the river and helicoptering out of the canyon. This summer we will be doing the same with two granddaughters. What fun!”

Richard A. Dickey, Hickory, North Carolina

1959

Stephen S. Wachtel, Memphis, Tennessee, still plays blues and jazz in various local venues and still paints. “I’ve launched a website to showcase my collection,” he reports. “Lots of work but I like the result” : www.shoel-art.com or www.shoelart.com.

1960s

1960

David J. Gury is enjoying his beach home in Ocean Ridge, Florida, not far from Boca Raton. He describes the joy of communicating with granddaughter Cameron Peters ’20 who is excelling in her studies and campus organization activities.

1960

Peter W. Rector returned from winter months in Delray Beach, Florida, to move into a new condo in Portsmouth, Rhode Island — hopefully his last move. “I am looking forward to our 60th in 2020!” Pete adds.

1960

Richard M. Schori, Reno, Nevada, stays active in tennis, pickleball and yoga, enjoying good health and still traveling. At the end of March he went on a sailing trip with friends off the coast of Belize.

1961

John E. Baker retired this year as photographer for the Flagship Niagara — “the brig that won the Battle of Lake Erie, which allowed Kenyon College to exist!” John still shoots for the Erie County Historical Society and the Arboretum at Frontier Park in Erie, Pennsylvania: “No salary involved, but I sure do get to some great parties,” he adds.

1961

R. Hutchins Hodgson Jr. traveled to Pasadena to watch his beloved Georgia Bulldogs beat Oklahoma and its Heisman Trophy winner, then to the national championship football game in Atlanta, in which “they should have beaten Alabama,” he laments. Hutch’s grandfather, dad, uncle and brother all played football for the University of Georgia. “We just got back from a Rock and Romance cruise with stops in Jamaica and the Cayman Islands,” he notes, “which featured some big-name bands from the ’70s. Really enjoying time with our 11 grandchildren.”

1962

Stewart D. Brown reports that 20 years in Hilton Head, South Carolina, have been good. He serves on the board of the Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival and Concours d’Elegance, the latter a 10-day racing event ranked third in the nation: “Come down first weekend in November when the weather is great — the show is spectacular.” Stew also chairs a tax funds committee for the town, and serves the finance committee of Cross Anglican church and the marketing committee for his neighborhood, Long Cove, a Pete Dye golf course-anchored residential community. Next up: 53rd wedding anniversary, two high-school graduations, a granddaughter wedding, all 27 of his clan for Christmas — and northern India next January.

1962

Richard A. Rubin, Mill Valley, California, muses: “Maybe it’s the California water and sunshine — or plain curiosity about how we will get through these curious times — that keeps us reluctant seniors active. As our roster thins out, I recommend to classmates the words of George Burns: ‘If you live to be 100, you’ve got it made. Very few people die past that age.’ Nevertheless, I deeply bemoan the passing last year of our esteemed classmate and brilliant alum Samuel Richmond '62, who was much too young when he left us. He felt a compelling obligation to make our society better. Now more than ever, I propose we continue that work.”

1963

Col. Lester D. Alford and his wife, Judy, celebrated their Golden Anniversary with a trip to east Africa, where their daughter, Karen, is a nurse practitioner in the refugee settlements of Uganda. “Over 2 million refugees from six neighboring countries are in Uganda, with about 1,000 more arriving per day,” Les describes. Following their visit, Les and Judy went on safari in Tanzania and Kenya, a highlight of which was a celebration of their 50th wedding anniversary in a traditional Maasai ceremony.

1963

Neal M. Mayer, Millsboro, Delaware, writes: “The only thing that would keep me away from our 55th reunion is the need to celebrate Jane’s 75th birthday on April 12. We have not missed being together on each of our birthdays for 55 years! I hope you all had a terrific visit and that we will all get together at the next one. We are both well for being mid-septuagenarians. Mornings always start with groans! You all know that.” Neal still practices law and makes business and pleasure trips, this year including a planned Venice-to-Rome cruise in August for their 55th anniversary. Although his four oldest grandchildren did not choose Kenyon, the next in line, a high-school junior, visited campus with his mother, Amy Mayer ’92, so Neal still has hope.

1963

William K. Woods received a lifetime achievement award from the Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition. A longtime advocate for social justice, Bill began researching homelessness in 1984, producing the first comprehensive study on the issue in Cincinnati. At Christ Church Cathedral, Bill’s community issues forums (more than 500 to date) have brought forth voices of understanding and respect.

1964

Jeffrey C. Breaks, Gloucester Point, Virginia, is in his 13th year of doing taxes through the AARP TaxAide Foundation. He volunteers at The Mariner’s Museum Chris Craft collection and published his second article on the use of these boats in World War II. “This shows that even a physics major from a liberal arts college can get published!” Jeff writes.

1964

Edwin L. McCampbell, Surfside Beach, South Carolina, celebrates his 50th year as a physician in June. An active primary-care physician and medical director for Amedisys Hospice, he was again selected as the number one internist in Myrtle Beach by RateMDs.

1964

John M. Capron splits time between Highlands, North Carolina, and Smyrna, Georgia, filling the year with occasional travel, reading, playing “mediocre duplicate bridge” and croquet, all while “resolutely avoiding people who could be offended by my antediluvian political and social perspective.”

1964

“So I’m 76. (Which is the new 77.) This fall — while on a yearlong leave of absence — I taught at Semester at Sea, my third voyage on the floating university. Then, after a month in Hawaii, I returned to Gambier, where I read and write and plan travels: Berlin in May, Austria in July. And back into Kenyon classrooms in the fall.”

P.F. Kluge, Gambier, Ohio

1965

Gary E. Kaltenbach is still announcing for the Fremont, Ohio, high school bands and football games. He has been umpiring for 44 years and playing church handbells for 27. "Still breathing, and still grateful for the Kenyon education and experience."

1965

John S. Kerr and his wife, Bonnie, put their North Carolina home on the market to prepare for their move to Scottsdale, Arizona. They will live in a continuing care retirement community called Vi at Grayhawk, placing them closer to Bonnie’s relatives and to the Mayo Clinic, which John will visit as a 10-year cancer survivor. “Our 40 years of living and working in boarding schools should make this a piece of cake,” he writes, but downsizing means “learning the wisdom of the Roman word for heavy baggage — impedimenta!”

1965

Robert A. Legg, Greensboro, Georgia, and his wife cruised the Amazon last November and from Los Angeles to Auckland, New Zealand, in January. He is now recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery, awaiting return to the links in July or August, and recalling his last 18-hole round with Howard B. Edelstein ’68 “at his fantastic SandRidge course last August.” Bob hopes you’ll join him in rooting for his roomie John A. Lynn '65.

1965

“Sorry to say the biggest news in my life is still my ongoing battle against bone marrow cancer — but glad to say I’m still in the fight. By my 75th birthday I want to be as ‘diesel’ (according to my teenage granddaughter) as I was at 70, just before I was diagnosed. Our new provider employs many holistic modalities we think will help me. About the first of March I got umbilical stem cells, which I’m sure came from the placenta of a baby destined for the Hall of Fame in some sport. If in Indianapolis, call me and I’ll buy you lunch — or at least some gum.”

John A. Lynn, Indianapolis, Indiana

1966

George H. Craig Jr. reports that although his granddaughter got into Kenyon, she chose St. Andrews University, and his next youngest is spending her high-school junior year in France. “I saw John C. ‘Jay’ Cocks Jr. '66 on YouTube last night plugging his latest movie, ‘Silence,’ an effort with Martin Scorsese.” He and Susan avoid Sewickley, Pennsylvania’s harsh winters by spending three months in Naples, Florida.

1966

Gary E. Friedlaender still works full-time despite stepping down after 30 years as chair of orthopedics and rehabilitation at Yale. His wife, Linda, is senior curator of education at Yale’s Center for British Art, daughter Eron works in pediatric emergency medicine at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia specializing in the autism spectrum, and son Ari is a marine biologist focused on whale ecology at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

1966

Martin L. Madorsky, Miami Beach, Florida, still practices urology and enjoys his second home in Telluride, Colorado. He sets all his grandchildren — including a first-year at Harvard, another in theater at Michigan — above himself: “I am the only dull one.”

1966

Louis H. Martone, Pittsburgh, now in his third month of retirement, finds it “very tolerable not to feel the pressure of work and have the time to do whatever. Getting thinner and stronger with gym workouts. May try a new sport an old guy could handle — curling!”

1966

Richard T. Nolan, Red Lodge, Montana, stood in blustery weather with other adults during the local high-school student walkout against gun violence in March. “I can only hope the Parkland deaths and demonstrations will finally result in reasonable actions to reduce the 38,600 who died in 2017 from guns.” This May, Dick and Gretchen will celebrate their 30th anniversary while on a cruise from Seattle to Kodiak Island and back.

1966

David B. Perry, Bronxville, New York, retired after 45 years in advertising but still keeps busy with a little consulting. “My 11-year-old daughter keeps me from aging too fast,” he adds.

1966

Z. Nicholas Zakov, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, traveled on safari with his wife, Donna, his brother Kamen N. Zakov ’67 and son Daryl A. Zakov ’96 to Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana. He and Donna went on to Cape Town, South Africa, and Namibia.

1967

Wayne D. Beveridge, Augusta, Georgia, reports that recouping from a “micro-surgery” took not a couple of weeks but a quarter of a year: “‘Microsurgery’ certainly says nothing about recovery. I’m sure age and pathology have something to do with it. Suffice it to say I’m on the mend.” Wayne’s 55th reunion packet from his prep school reminded him that time is flying by.

1967

Phil Cerny, York, England, still makes far-flung academic trips, including for seven weeks this July and August to Australia, where he will attend a conference, give talks, visit friends and relatives and spend three weeks as a visiting fellow at the University of Tasmania. “It’s near where my great-great-grandfather was ‘transported’ as a petty criminal from Liverpool,” he observes. “I’m also playing in a five-piece folk band called Ramshackle.”

1967

Bill S. Schnall, Shoreline, Washington, informs: “Despite having traveled widely, including over 30 cruises, my wife and I returned from a two-plus-week Antarctic expedition totally speechless — and ‘speechless’ is indeed rare for a native New Yorker.” Bill is busy with Seattle rental real estate and extends his hospitality to anyone traveling through — especially on an Alaskan cruise.

1967

Charles Schwarzbeck sends greetings from San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. “Our family relocated here last year and we are enjoying it all. Son Nicholas thrives in seventh grade at a Cambridge Curriculum school, and Chandra and I run an international couples retreat to bring effective care with fun and great cultural experiences to couples. We are grateful to our neighbors, who have warmly welcomed us. Come visit.”

1968

Gregory W. Blackmer, Neptune Beach, Florida, retired on March 22 after more than 23 years with Bank of America. “Time to travel!” Greg cheers.

1968

Mark S. Geston, Boise, Idaho, has kept busy since retirement welcoming visits from classmates and their spouses: William J. Yost '68 and William E. Bennett '68; J. Bryan Perilman '68 for rafting last summer; and Geoffrey J. Hackman '68 and Daniel G. Hale Jr. '68 in Sun Valley — “a good opportunity to get our Kenyon stories consistent for retelling at the reunion,” he notes. Oldest daughter Camille A. La Croix ’91 remains local although youngest Emily S. Geston ’01 relocated to Dallas.

1968

C. Stephen Hayes, Dayton, Ohio, felt fortunate when the Lords baseball team joined him in Florida in winter. Early this March, Steve wrote, “I spent today with the team at historic Dodgertown and was given a Lords hat by Coach Matt (Burdette) to recognize the 50th anniversary of catching my last game as captain in 1968. They lost a thriller 4-3. Wonderful memories of all my great teammates. Very thankful for the opportunity.”

1968

“From 1964 to 1968 — clearly, tumultuous years in this country and abroad — I was neither a newspaper reader nor a watcher of lounge television. I lived in a world of my own making, enabled by the literature I drank in at Ascension Hall. Today, however, I race through the New York Times, reading in stupefaction of the world’s sorrow and lunacy let loose. … In spite of my naivete while at Kenyon, I am grateful that the seeds of later realism and even courage were planted there.”

Eric E. Linder, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

1968

Richard C. Malley, Pawlet, Vermont, met his wife 52 years ago at Kenyon, an event they marked by returning to Gambier two years ago. “The memories flooded back,” Dick writes. “I will never forget my four years at Kenyon, and I am glad that Kenyon has continued to serve students well.”

1968

Raymond S. Pfeiffer lives for six months in the Thousand Islands on the Canadian side of the St. Lawrence River, with winter months in Ottawa or upstate New York. He works on his antique boats and cruises the St. Lawrence on them with a friend “in a hedonistic tour-de-force,” he reports.

1968

“So busy being retired, I wonder how I found time to work! Near the end of a five-year journey writing a novel, with the help of a Kenyon Review novelists workshop and others. Lots of grandchildren to love. Fish to run a fly by.”

Pierce E. Scranton Jr., Ketchum, Idaho

1969

Kenneth R. Abraham, Dover, Delaware, remains busy helping people all over the country with criminal justice issues and recently published an article about sex offender laws in Criminal Legal News. “Although I suspect most Kenyon grads know little about it,” Ken writes, “the criminal justice system is a real train wreck, the source of much injustice.” Ken plans a trip to Florida this summer to see good friends.

1969

James S. Fine III, Bristol, Pennsylvania, and his wife returned in April to Erbil in northern Iraq for a three- or four-month interim relief and development position with the Mennonite Central Committee. Jim and Deborah spent 2010 to 2014 in the area. “Some people are beginning to return to Mosul and the villages of the Nineveh Plain after the defeat of ISIS,” he writes, “but relief is still needed and reconstruction has only just begun.”

1970s

1970

“I continue to live in Emeryville, California, across the bay from San Francisco. Eric P. Allemano was just here visiting, and I was able to show him many of the delights of the Bay Area before he returned to France.”

David P. Adams, Emeryville, California

1970

Robert C. Boruchowitz will supervise at Seattle University School of Law the first cohort of Calhoun Family Fellows, law students working on equal justice. “My Defender Initiative continues to work in partnership with the Sixth Amendment Center on public defense assessments on technical assistance,” Bob writes.

1970

Samuel R. Dorrance Jr., Leesburg, Virginia, recently launched Rising Tide Literary Agency and continues to sail the Chesapeake Bay whenever possible.

1970

Paul G. Keiner, Henniker, New Hampshire, retires from classroom teaching in June but will continue tutoring veterans. His sextet, the Kokes Klassics, performs at various venues including the facility where E. Robert Plunkett '70 resides.

1970

Col. Charles H. Matthewson happily announces the March marriage of son James to Ana Garcia, both of Tucson, Arizona — “completing the ‘marrying-off’ of all three children,’” Chuck beams, “with the bonus results of three beautiful grandchildren all here in Tucson with us. We’re declaring victory!”

1970

Anthony W. Olbrich, Boise, Idaho, and Earl A. Dorsey Jr. '70 walked the Dingle Way along the Dingle Peninsula coastline of Ireland in April. “It’s a 10-day hike from village to village, so not too stressful,” Tony explains, “and lubricated by pints of Guinness and the occasional dram of whiskey.”

1970

“I continue to present my LineStorm Animation Digital FlipBook Creative Learning Projects in Boston-area schools, colleges and museums. I’m now working with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics on a ‘learn science by doing science’ project to help students animate the life cycle of a star.”

J.D. Pell Osborn

1970

“If good fences make good neighbors, passable singers make good, long-lasting friendships. I still see James S. Hecox ’69, Paul G. Keiner '70, Eric B. Herr '70 and others. Eugene R. Mancini '70 lives on the wrong coast but remains one of my best friends. Time spent singing with old friends is my favorite connection to Kenyon.”

E. Robert Plunkett, Andover, Massachusetts

1970

Andrew D. Stewart, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, has been a serial entrepreneur in the medical device space for 15 years after 30 years in marketing at Johnson & Johnson. His latest project is brain mapping software to identify brain features related to autism; Andy’s role is to raise capital and assist in business development to move to commercialization. “Who knew after all those Delt parties I would end up on the straight and narrow?” Andy marvels. “Looking to connect with Jay G. Tervorrow '70 — if you read this, Jay, call me.”

1970

Arthur K. Vedder, Santa Cruz, California, retires this year after 41 years of medical practice. “Planning a trip to Easter Island, one of the world’s few locations more isolated than Gambier,” Art says.

1971

Robert E. Leverone, Yonkers, New York, is “still using my drama degree working on shows for U.S. government broadcasting as New York bureau chief for the Voice of America,” he writes. Bob and wife Ellyn Leverone ’73 enjoy traveling the world with daughter Tessa and son Adam E. Leverone ’08.

1972

“Parkinson’s takes you to the strangest places. I’m now enrolled in a boxing program in which half a dozen others with PD and I punch at various objects (not each other) and learn to improve our leg and arm movements. Those who thought they might tangle with me are forewarned. Also in a study on whether guitar playing will help fine motor skills — I’m headed either for the ring or the hootenanny.”

David L. Bergman, Baltimore, Maryland

1972

John H. Emack, Rocky River, Ohio, meets Susan Paley Weaver ’73, Norman E. Schmidt ’71 and Edward J. Moran ’73 for lunch and the occasional cocktail, and he is a fan of the Rockin’ Ravers, a band with fraternity brother Arthur B. “Chip” Sansom '72.

1972

Barry Gross, Media, Pennsylvania, was recently inducted into the American College of Trial Lawyers and practices as a white-collar criminal defense attorney, now taking active cases in Canada and Poland.

1973

Jeffrey L. Bennett, Midland, Michigan, had 16 of his photographs displayed in a three-person art show in Bay City, Michigan.

1973

Jean C. Dunbar, Lexington, Virginia, continues work with the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, writing up discoveries about the artist’s early life and overseeing restoration of his sitting room at Cedar Grove in Catskill, New York. Summer and fall take her to southwestern England for hikes through the region’s scenic trails.

1973

Jan M. Stein Guifarro, New York City, still works at Colgate-Palmolive and takes in lots of concerts, dance performances and off-Broadway theater.

1973

Michael A. Hirschfeld notes that his law firm moved from Cincinnati’s Fifth Third Center to the former headquarters of HGTV and the Food Channel in the Scripps Center, two blocks south — “a much more modern, bright and invigorating space! On a Kenyon-related note,” Mike writes, “our youngest daughter, Michelle, works for Phillips auction house in New York City, which just sold Paul Newman’s Rolex Daytona racing watch for $17.8 million to an anonymous bidder. One of you?” he jokes.

1973

Mitchell L. Jablons, Watchung, New Jersey, retired in February after 33 years as an anesthesiologist at Overlook Hospital. “Looking forward to more time traveling the world with my wife, improving my tennis game, sleeping late and spending time with my 9-month-old grandson,” Mitch writes.

1973

Kay Koeninger, Yellow Springs, Ohio, a professor at Sinclair Community College in Dayton, directs “Encountering Ethics,” a project that “empowers faculty in technology and science to use humanities resources to teach ethics in their courses,” she informs.

1973

Shirley J. Leow, Lakewood, Colorado, attended Professor Judy Holdener’s Kenyon Learning Event in Denver on mathematical perspectives and came away with ideas for awesome art quilts. She celebrated her 65th birthday with her daughter on a trip to Zambia, Botswana and South Africa.

1973

Bonnie Levinson began an arts education project creating an artist-in-residency program for a charter school in Richmond, California, resulting in site-specific artwork for the expansion of its middle-school campus. Studio time doing painting and photography have brought forth stunning new work you can find at bonnielevinson.com. She’ll bike the roads around Amsterdam in May admiring tulips and the beautiful countryside.

1973

David H. Linnenkohl, Dayton, Ohio, manages IT contracts for the Air Force. “At this point I am just trying to figure out how much longer I want to do this before I retire and start doing the things I want to do,” Dave notes. September will mark his 15th year with defense contractor CACI.

1973

Off-Broadway shows produced by Philip R. Roy include “My Son the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy” (Los Angeles; Dallas; Port Washington, New York); “My Mother’s Italian, My Father’s Jewish, and I’m in Therapy!” (Tacoma, Washington, and Phoenix); “Cooking with the Calamari Sisters” (Boston area); and “WaistWatchers: The Musical” (Lakewood, Colorado). “Good thing I still like to travel and tour with my shows,” he notes from Philadelphia.

1973

Ann Starr returned home to Columbus, Ohio, this March from three weeks of writing at the Ragdale Foundation, the artists colony in Lake Forest, Illinois. “Stimulating and helpful colleagues,” she sums up. “Made 100 pages of hay, half gold, half … well, hay!”

1973

Julia E. Miller Vick, who lives in Haddonfield, New Jersey, with James W. Vick ’74, participated in the March for Our Lives in Washington on March 24. Next, she notes, a 2019 Philadelphia-area Purple Palooza music and arts festival may be in the works. Their son David C. Vick ’12 works in Los Angeles on the CBS show “Man with a Plan.” On a visit to Joshua Tree, California, Stephen H. Dachman '73 took the Vicks to Hollyhocks, a Frank Lloyd Wright residence, and in April they traveled to France and visited Maria C. “Mia” Halton '73, there on an artist’s residency.

1974

Jamie J. Barth retired last December after 16 years with AIG. In April, she and Richard E. Yorde Jr. ’71 relocated to a timber loft in Chicago’s West Loop inside a renovated Nabisco factory near downtown. The move came hard on the heels of their three-week trip to Australia and New Zealand.

1974

“Watch for films I have gaffed recently — ‘House of Tomorrow’ with Ellen Burstyn and Nick Offerman and ‘The Coolest Girl in the World’ directed by Bo Burnham. And check out Drink Wine and Learn on Facebook.”

Edward A. Cohen, Minneapolis, Minnesota

1974

Alice C. Fleming moved to Branford, Connecticut, during a “tumultuous” year: Her father fell ill and died in July at age 90; her daughter, whose husband began his M.B.A., moved to Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and her son in New York City started working for Google and was married in a festive ceremony at Rockefeller Center.

1974

Marilyn Jones Goodman retired from her second career as a paralegal at JPMorgan Chase and at the Ohio attorney general’s office. She is zoning committee chair for the Northwest (Columbus) Civic Association board and a tour guide at the Ohio Supreme Court Visitor Education Center.

1974

Alva G. Greenberg, Old Saybrook, Connecticut, began a new career as an independent curator with two shows, one at the Lyme Academy of Fine Art titled “Female/Feminist/2017,” the other at the Lyman Allyn Museum titled “On Another Note: The Intersection of Art and Music.” Alva returns to Gambier at least once a year as a board member of the Gund Art Gallery — “an amazing place and a great asset to the college and greater community,” she describes.

1974

Kenneth W. Heick, Great Falls, Virginia, watches the nearby goings-on in Washington “with a combination of curiosity, astonishment and incredulity,” he writes. “Practicing law and real estate — not done yet.”

1974

Rob Kolson is producing two shows on Broadway: “‘Once on This Island’ opened to rave reviews in December and has set box-office records at Circle in the Square Theater,” he writes. His upcoming production, “Getting the Band Back Together,” opens in July at the Belasco. Rob is also putting the finishing touches on his three-year renovation of Apollo Theater Chicago, the Lincoln Park theater he owns.

1974

Stewart F. Peck has two new grandchildren, a boy and a girl. “That makes three, and all live in New Orleans — life is good!”

1974

Laurie Petrie Roche retired in January after a 40-year career in journalism and public relations, her last position as VP of communications for the Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio. She is enjoying volunteering, photography, time in nature, grandchildren and travel — “always with gratitude,” she adds.

1974

Janet A. Bloss Shuff and Ronald F. Shuff have been traveling. Last year to Russia; Portugal this August. In March they returned from a mission trip to Rwanda, visiting schools and delivering food to the slums of Kigali. She informs, “Africa New Life is a wonderful organization that sponsors children in Rwanda so they can go to a good school, have supplies, eat at least one good meal a day, receive medical care and have a chance at rising above the appalling poverty level.” She’s still kickboxing, but jujitsu is on hold since her trainer broke his foot.

1974

Peter Smagorinsky has been named Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Universidad de Guadalajara in Jalisco, Mexico, while remaining a research professor at the University of Georgia, where he has taught since 1998.

1974

Sidney E. Wanetick retired on Jan. 5 as chief medical executive at Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, California, concluding a 35-year career there as an OB/GYN physician and hospital administrator. He writes, “I had lunch with Jim Breece at Henry’s Hunan, then made good on my decades-old threat to run away to Mexico to our recently completed house.”

1975

Douglas B. Anderson, Middlebury, Vermont, enjoyed a visit from roommate Robert S. Eichler '75 when Bob dropped by for some passionate conversation about theater construction. Doug’s restored 1883 theater is in its 10th season, and he is planning a new theater in Contoocook Valley, New Hampshire. Kenyon’s influence is strong: Charlotte Jones “Shami” McCormick '75 and Stephen S. Stettler ’74 established theaters in the area, and Doug huddled recently with Gail E. Meyer Gibson '75 who, with husband Robert B. Gibson '75, is doing the same on Cape Cod.

1975

“We still live in the Detroit area and enjoy all that is happening downtown. We also find ourselves in the air often with our boys in California and a new granddaughter to visit.”

Elaine Couch Brown, Detroit, Michigan

1975

Gail E. Meyer Gibson, who welcomes visitors to Cape Cod, is grandmother to two “adorable” boys, one on the autism spectrum who is “doing so well with lots of intervention.” Her passion is working with a nonprofit called Arts Empowering Life that encompasses a marching band, brass group, Elements Theatre, Gloriae Dei Cantores Choir and a young people’s percussion group.

1975

Emily Crom Lyons and her husband divide their time between Darien, Connecticut, and Bonita Springs, Florida. She is grateful for a second granddaughter born in August, a good life in retirement and the excellent education and lifelong friendships made at Kenyon.

1975

Charlotte Jones “Shami” McCormick and husband Daniel J. McCormick '75 live in Orlando, Florida, where Shami works at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Orlando. Shami will direct a production of “Bad Jews” for Mad Cow Theatre this summer and is looking for a literary agent. They and their son Conor W. McCormick ’10 celebrate their niece’s induction into the Class of 2022.

1975

Donna Bertolet Poseidon, Atlanta, is “still enjoying working and making a difference at Secureworks, a fun little second career. I’m heading to London to spend time with my daughter Katherine. Had a great phone call with William D. Lindenmuth '75 on his birthday.”

1975

Neil E. Russell, Burlington, Massachusetts, retired from Rubicon Project on March 1. After clearing snow, he’s been in his woodworking shop and planning sailing trips.

1975

Allerton G. Smith, Key Largo, Florida, is acclimating to Florida retirement lifestyle despite being in the youngest quartile of his community’s population. Tony joined conservation groups protecting manatees, wild birds and coral reefs; won some mixed doubles tennis tournaments and close-to-the-hole golf competitions; and became treasurer in a very active rod and gun club. “Almost every day starts with a nice walk with our dog Dalai in the golf course and ends with a dip in the pool. Stop in for some fun.”

1975

Murray J. Smith, Gambier, Ohio, and his wife spent two fantastic weeks in Kenya visiting a former colleague and touring national parks. They also met up with Gianna S. Biaggi ’17, who started an after-school program for girls in Kibera, Nairobi’s poorest neighborhood. “She’s changing the world, one girl at a time.”

1975

Diane E. Souder, Albuquerque, New Mexico, retired after more than 40 years with the National Park Service. “While I won’t be jumping into the green and gray every morning,” she writes, “I do plan to continue work as a public information officer on fire assignments; 2018 promises to be a big year for fires in the West.”

1976

Robin E. Osler’s architectural firm recently completed a residence for Stephen Dubner of Freakonomics fame. She teaches at the Architecture School at City College of New York. In December, she traveled to Kenya with two students to present an assembly space design for a school in the Maasai Mara, and she welcomes donations now that fundraising for its construction has begun.

1976

Richard E. Schoenberger, Los Angeles, is in his 25th year at Sony Pictures Entertainment. After visiting his daughter in Kuala Lumpur he traveled on to Siem Reap, Cambodia, and Chiang Mai, Thailand. “Too infrequently in touch with James R. Fryman ’75, Thomas B. Arnold ’75, Pamela Kling Takiff ’79 and Margrit B. Polak Shield ’77,” he adds. “If in LA be sure to get in touch.”

1976

Deborah E. Boone Tepper lives on Cape Cod four days a week but now works as an M.D. in neurology at Dartmouth Hitchcock in New Hampshire three days a week. “Great job and worth the weekly commute.”

1976

“I’ve enjoyed serving as a director of the Philander Chase Conservancy and the new green burial cemetery, the Kokosing Nature Preserve. Both organizations are important participants in the liveliness of Knox County these days. In fact, Bob and I will be ‘planted’ at the beautiful KNP when we ‘shuffle off this mortal coil.’ Meanwhile, we love living in Gambier.”

Cornelia “Buffy” Ireland Hallinan, Gambier, Ohio

1976

“I write from Sabi Sabi Selati lodge in South Africa, where I am on the trip of a lifetime to see all the wonders of African wildlife. One gets into a philosophical mode in understanding the cycles of life and reminders of Kipling’s ‘Just So Stories.’ Back to the snows of Minnesota soon.”

Tanna L. Moore

1976

Roger Walton Jones, Eastland, Texas, continues to “try and engage freshmen in studying poetry at Ranger College while my wife enjoys her new job as a lab tech at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas. Yesterday she had the honor of giving a flu shot to Laura Bush.”

1977

Rosemary P. (Williams) Begley, Louisburg, Kansas, participated in this year’s Epcot International Festival of the Arts at Disney World, with paintings that depict mostly architectural scenes of the parks with occasional characters — “and definitely hidden Mickeys.” Three years after her golden retriever passed, she has gratefully welcomed a new 6-year-old trained female into her home.

1977

Katherine Bingley DeCoster enjoyed a dinner with classmates hosted by Jerome Mindes '77, and then sponsored Catherine A. Wessel ’19 as part of the Kenyon Job Shadow program. Catherine spent two days at the Trust for Public Land’s Washington, D.C., office learning about careers in the environment and conservation world, “with a healthy side of ‘life in the swamp’ through my work lobbying Congress,” Kathy writes. A lovely three-week vacation in Lyon, France, was, for her, all about Roman ruins: “Once a Kenyon history major, always a Kenyon history major!”

1977

Patrick J. Edwards, Boulder, Colorado, took a job with US Bank as West region planner/insurance specialist, but his joys were the arrival of granddaughter Cici in February and the marriage of his younger daughter. Meanwhile, Pat trains for three summer mountain running races — “something I never thought I’d be doing growing up at 500 feet altitude in Chicago,” he adds.

1977

Edwin S. Sheffield Jr. enjoys the fast pace of life in New York City, coaching clients and composing a book on navigating the job market. Win welcomes advice from those who have experience with editors, agents and publishers.

1978

Robert C. Hyzy is a professor of medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. In his spare time, Bob enjoys tennis, Pimsleur and spiritual materialism.

1978

Robert H. Mitchell and Elizabeth Laitner Mitchell ’80 say life as grandparents in Richmond, Virginia, gets better every day, with 2-1/2-year-old Ruffin living just two blocks away. A bank consultant, Rob has been busy with new risk-management software, and Betsy continues her work at a designer jewelry store.

1978

R. Todd Ruppert sends regrets and well wishes regarding reunion attendance. Since retiring as global CEO of T. Rowe Price, he has invested in numerous companies and joined boards all over the globe in financial services, technology, media, entertainment, education and strategy consulting. Although he stepped down from the Kenyon board after a decade, he remains on its endowment investment committee. His eldest daughter, a cancer survivor, was married in April — to a doctor.

1978

Charles F. Tighe retired after 25 years of teaching music in Cobb County Schools, Georgia. After spring travel to Hawaii, Amsterdam, Paris and New York, Charlie will begin a series of two-week workshops for summer teacher training. Then it’s part-time positions at Reinhardt University and Kennesaw State University in the fall — “just enough to keep me busy.”

1979

Robert E. Fisher will retire in June 35 years after completing medical school and after 30 years of clinical practice in hematology/oncology. “Laurie and I will enjoy our home in the Colorado mountains. We will pursue outdoor activities every day and enjoy time with our daughter and her husband, also visiting our younger daughter, husband and first grandchild, born in September, in the Phoenix area.”

1979

Jonathan A. Helitzer continues to work at Arch Insurance in Hartford, Connecticut, “mainly to spite my retired peers and because I enjoy the company and people,” he writes. Son Adam finishes his first year of Harvard Business School, while daughter Eliane graduates from Middlebury; they visited her in Spain for a week in May. Meanwhile, high schoolers Gretchen and Kirsten will hit the soccer field and crew shell, respectively. “Stop by if in northwestern Connecticut.”

1979

“After 16 years working for a private cultural resource management company, I have moved to the public sector. In many ways, it seems far more complex over here. I am now an employee of the Laboratory of Tree Ring Research (LTRR) at the University of Arizona (UoA) … at a National Park Service (NPS) facility that houses the Western Archeological and Conservation Center (WACC). I am beginning to appreciate the government’s love of acronyms.”

Jody O. Holmes, Tucson, Arizona

1979

“I did a synoptic major at Kenyon with the English, drama and political science departments, and now it all applies. In January, I directed the play ‘For the Loyal,’ written in response to the Jerry Sandusky scandal at Penn State. The previous fall, I played Lady Bracknell in ‘The Importance of Being Earnest,’ proving how old I am.” Kathleen has two poetry chapbooks coming out this year and is an elected precinct committeeman — “gender-neutral language coming soon,” she adds. “So I keep doing everything I ever learned. Thanks, Kenyon!”

Kathleen V. Kirk, Normal, Illinois

1979

Louise D. Suhr still enjoys life in Seattle, working as a nurse practitioner at Harborview Medical Center. “Starting to consider post-work life,” she writes, “including more outdoor activities, more yoga and new endeavors. Super pleased that Allison Janney ’82 won an Oscar!”

1979

William S. Whitaker, Concord, Ohio, who became a grandparent last year, traveled to England in February to surprise Bill’s freshman roommate Gordon H. Fraser '79 for his 60th birthday in Heathfield, East Sussex. Gordon and Bill agreed that their jam session was a decided improvement over playing air drums and air guitar in 315 McBride back in 1975.

1980s

1980

Andrew T. Bowers, Littleton, Massachusetts, switched from teaching high-school French in Worcester to teaching middle school French and Spanish in Woburn: “As I like to say, ‘Yo hablo Español tres bien!’ My partner, Ivan, and I celebrated our fifth anniversary in February.”

1980

“After living in the Cleveland area for the past 26 years and growing Saab, BMW and Volvo stores, I have moved back to central Ohio and am growing MAG Volvo of Dublin’s franchise. We are empty nesters and enjoying Columbus again.”

C. Carlos Dague, Columbus, Ohio

1980

Leslie S. Gepfert Marting is a Cleveland interior designer and volunteers as the head of a Garden Club of America scholarship, which gets her to NYC twice a year to see daughter Pauline. Her older son Michael G. Marting Jr. ’14 is also in Cleveland but thinking about a move to the Big Apple as well.

1980

Stephen R. Sexsmith, Hershey, Pennsylvania, after 21 years in teaching high-school chemistry, is working on a principal certificate. “It’s time to have a bigger impact on more kids,” Steve writes. “Come visit. We have chocolate.”

1980

Karl J. Shefelman thanks everyone who watched, rated and reviewed his film “Looking for the Jackalope” online. This spring his distributor takes it to the Cannes Film Market to try to sell it to foreign territories. In April, Karl headed to St. Louis to direct a short film for a writer/producer as a proof of concept for a full-length movie based on a novel.

1981

Jonathan A. Bernstein, Cincinnati, is now a grandfather, and celebrates 35 years of marriage this year. Two children are in Chicago, one is in New York, and Joshua S. Bernstein ’10 is in the residency match for internal medicine. Jon still sees his “bro from another mother” David E. Erteschik ’79 regularly.

1981

Karen M. Regan Jaffe, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, is almost five years into retirement but busier than ever: “My Parkinson’s disease has put much on my plate,” she writes, “as a member of the Michael J. Fox Foundation Patient Advisory Council, a co-founder of InMotion (a wellness center for PD), and as a Team Fox $1M fundraiser.” She received the 2018 InMotion Parkinson’s Visionary Award in April.

1981

Patricia D. Lynn, Haddonfield, New Jersey, is seeing silver: 25 years of marriage to Paul Steltz, English teacher and “all around great guy,” and 25 years as a librarian at the University of Pennsylvania.

1982

Mary “Molly” Poling Elkind relocated to Santa Fe, New Mexico, after holding a solo show of her tapestries in Atlanta. She looks forward to continuing to weave and teach.

1982

Grace A. Keefe Huebscher was elected to the board of directors of Freddie Mac, the provider of mortgage capital to lenders. A former president of Capital One Multifamily Finance, Grace has decades of experience in the real estate and capital markets industries. In a press release, Non-Executive Freddie Mac Chair Christopher S. Lynch said, “We look forward to the valuable insights and entrepreneurial spirit Grace will bring to the board.”

1982

John T. Mackessy and Linda Day-Mackessy ’83, Bexley, Ohio, saw their oldest son married in July and their youngest off to Georgetown University. In September, they visited daughter Julia in Australia, where she was studying. Last but not least, Benjamin D. Mackessy ’16 was working in Chicago “and paying his own bills,” they write.

1982

Suzanne D. Morrill retired after teaching college photography in Eugene, Oregon, for 30 years. Susie now fills her time with a teenage son and a show kennel full of Labradors in a barn full of endurance horses. She has traveled to Cuba numerous times and is working on a book of her images from those adventures.

1982

“Work and home life are chugging along while our three daughters turn on the jets to leave us behind. Great things are happening in high-school speech and debate, as well as WGBH and RMPBS public media. Our oldest has landed a big one after college graduation with full-time employment as a dolphin trainer at Georgia Aquarium. Seeing your child with a passion is a great treat.”

G. Darwin Toll, Denver, Colorado

1983

Linda Day-Mackessy and John T. Mackessy ‘82, Bexley, Ohio, saw their oldest son married in July and their youngest off to Georgetown University. In September, they visited daughter Julia in Australia, where she was studying. Last but not least, Benjamin D. Mackessy ’16 was working in Chicago “and paying his own bills,” they write.

1983

Virginia “Ginger” L. Deely Halstrom checked off a bucket list item in February when she and husband Howard spent two weeks in Australia with two of their daughters, one of whom began a semester abroad. “We hiked, snorkeled, Segwayed, quad biked as well as rode trains, planes and cable cars while visiting rain forests, mountains, sand dunes, the reef, desert and various cities of this amazing country. Best vacation ever,” she summed up.

1983

Richard Howell still works at Shoreline Orthopedics in Holland, Michigan, and has been celebrating many offspring achievements: Daughter Carly graduated from Hillsdale and was married last fall; son Chase is a junior at the University of Michigan; daughter Riley started at Michigan State; and sixth-grade son Quinn holds the fort at home.

1983

Douglas H. Thompson is still living and working in “the rocking boro” of Elverson, Pennsylvania, northern Chester County, working for Vixen Hill, a custom cedar outdoor structure manufacturer. “The Hopewell Big Woods has 73,000 roadless acres to explore,” Doug writes, “so contact me if you would like to go for a hike.”

1984

Helen C. “Missy” Bemis, Skokie, Illinois, and her husband, with help from classmate Zali Win '84, traveled to Myanmar in November for an extended cultural visit. “Beautiful country,” she writes. “Zali connected us to people doing interesting art and nonprofit work.”

1984

Angelica Y. Burwell, who has been living in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada, for 16 years, sends this note: “It is a lovely UNESCO World Heritage Site, and I urge everyone to come up for a visit, maybe a K-’80s get-together. I have had my shop and gallery, Jenny Jib, for 15 years, and it gets better every year. Or so they say!”

1984

“I think I have another good 20 years in me, then I want to be a volunteer doctor and yoga instructor. Got my certification in yoga at age 50.”

Joseph Caperna, San Diego, California

1984

Lisa Stearns Deal was recently promoted to assistant vice president and chief procurement officer at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Her son graduates from high school and her daughter graduates from New College of Florida in Sarasota this year.

1984

Daniel A. Dessner is director of pediatric radiology at Toledo Children’s Hospital. Spending much time teaching residents and other learners, Dan writes that he enjoys the practice of medicine but “dreads” dealing with insurance companies, benefit managers and all the other forces that make it hard to do the right thing for patients.

1984

Andrew A. Folkerth, Denver, took a sabbatical from his law firm and traveled with his wife to New Zealand and Thailand. Along the way, Andy visited Stephen D. Behrendt '84, a professor at Victoria University of Wellington. “It was like old times catching up with Steve,” Andy describes.

1984

Katherine Webster Kindbom is a college counselor at St. Louis University High School, “the second oldest Jesuit high school in the country, celebrating its 200th anniversary this year — six years older than our mighty Kenyon College!” Kate writes. “It’s fun working with all boys on the high-school-to-college transition process. Our daughter, Kelsey, was married June 2, 2017.”

1985

Mary E. Chalmers, Speedway, Indiana, after studying and teaching about communities in history for decades, now engages with current-day communities and neighborhoods through coaching, training and encouraging them to share their positive stories in an annual one-day Neighbor Power Indy event. She has been elected to the vestry of Trinity Episcopal Church.

1985

“We are settled in Germany, and Schorschi, now 3 years old, is growing like a weed and full of energy. I am working part time at an English-language day care and finishing two music CDs that I have been working on for a while. We had a wonderful visit with Susan M. Chrysler last fall in Kentucky.”

Julia D. Eastin Dubowy, Germany

1985

Sarah Kading Frankum, Redmond, Washington, celebrates her daughter’s study abroad in Singapore, remembering her own time doing so in London 35 years ago — “but without a cellphone or credit card!” Sarah is enjoying her retirement from Microsoft.

1985

Katherine Fonyo Pisano, Baltimore, still works at Johns Hopkins Hospital and enjoys “staying connected with a certain group of women; you know who you are, you all have very chic purple PJs in your closets!”

1985

Patrick J. Shields, New York City, has shut down Shields Window Cleaning after 31 years to return full time to the arts. He is following and filming two soccer fans for a full-length documentary “about their love for each other, country and soccer.” Its working title is “Eagle Man and Wonder Woman: An American Love Story,” and he has shot footage in New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Florida. “On to Russia in June,” Patrick notes. “Look for me pretending to read documents on the Axe Capital floor in Season 3 of ‘Billions.’”

1986

Beatrice Huste-Peterson, East Islip, New York, continues to fight the mystery of autism with her charity, EJ Autism Foundation, and thanks ’86ers for their support. Bea and her team have raised over a million dollars supporting programs and individuals on the autism spectrum (ejautismfoundation.org).

1986

Margaret C. Rule Moser and her husband decided that retirement in California was not right for them yet and returned to St. Louis. Peggy works in alumni and development for Washington University and is considering returning to school for a master’s in nonprofit management or human resources management.

1986

Mary Beth Atkinson Stephens and Harvey M. Stephens ’85 write that oldest son Harvey “Bennett” Stephens II ’15 enters medical school in August; next year he will be residing near them in Springfield, Illinois, after he completes his first year of medical school.

1986

Thomas L. Tobin and Tracy L. Davis, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, continue their connection with Fieldstone Therapeutic Riding Center — Tom on the board of trustees, Tracy a twice-a-week volunteer. Tom celebrated his five-year anniversary as a development consultant for the American Council for the Blind, establishing new policy to create an endowment fund to perpetuate the organization’s work long into the future.

1986

John W. Zinsser is one year into his role as chief ombuds officer for the International Committee of the Red Cross. “Every day is an adventure,” John explains. “Also had the honor of speaking as part of Geneva’s Democracy Week. Excited to do my second Creative Mornings talk. Would love to hear from any classmates coming through Geneva.”

1987

Scott A. Ettin is manager of digital media and data services at Technicolor-Postworks in New York City and has taught beginner and intermediate digital photography at the International Center of Photography’s school for six years. A competitive triathlete and marathon runner, he has raced “multiple Olympic-distance triathlons and one painful but fantastic Half Ironman triathlon.”

1987

Julie A. McLaughlin, Alexandria, Virginia, plans to retire this summer after 25 years at the World Bank, most recently as adviser to the vice presidents for global practices and the social sectors VP. She plans to be in her retirement home in La Jolla, California, by fall 2019. “I am looking at a change in careers, exploring options in domestic social issues for the first time since I completed Social Action at Stone Ridge!” she writes. “Stone Ridge friends have been lifelong, and I look forward to both seeing them here during the reunion and then visiting as we travel west.”

1987

Harriet Stern and Curt B. Kinsky ’85, Hong Kong, staffed the Kenyon table at a recent international school’s college fair with some disappointment: “What I can say is that KC has no brand in Hong Kong!” They nevertheless applied “serious charm and charisma” to the task. This summer they return home to the Bay Area, where their two children will enter middle school and high school.

1987

J. Pamela DeMeritt Tan, Amherst, Massachusetts, updates that she is “retired from homeschooling,” with all five children moved on to high school and beyond. “Definitely feeling the empty-nest syndrome,” Pam writes. “I am finally digging down into the untouched corners of piled-up stuff to organize, get rid of and declutter. My responsibilities for my church’s children’s program take up a good portion of my time, as well as dreaming about gardening.”

1988

Lawrence J. Apke recently moved to Burlingame, California, with his wife and three sons (26, 22 and 12) and is doing software consulting with Agile. In addition, Larry founded a nonprofit called The Job Hackers, which trains and places people in career transition free of charge.

1988

David V. Bartram, a sociologist at the University of Leicester, England, describes the most interesting part of life recently as a sustained strike: “Academics are up in arms on account of how universities here are screwing with our pensions. The financial hit is bad, but what’s worse is how they think they can impose it without smart people delving into the data and assumptions and figuring out how flawed their analysis is. People are fired up, and it has been pretty empowering to get more involved in our union,” he writes.

1988

Jessica Brown is principal of the Julia R. Masterman school, a fifth- through 12th-grade public school in Philadelphia. She recently reconnected with alumni through the Philly Kenyon Coffee Klatch. “Biggest highlight this year?” she adds. “The Eagles win the Super Bowl!”

1988

Marta Johnson Fiscus relocated to Denver after having lived in her hometown of Cumberland, Maryland, since 1993. One son enters college and another “will be the new kid in school as a seventh-grader. Denver folks, look me up!”

1988

Amy Miller Keane is completing her 23rd year as a bilingual (Spanish and ESL) teacher in Austin, Texas, and the past few years she has been an instructional coach for teachers. She and her family love Austin’s redeveloped Mueller neighborhood and its “urban feel, public parks and walkability to businesses,” she writes. She had a great time hanging out with Scott Garson ’85 back home in Cleveland last summer.

1988

Meredith C. Moore serves as vice chair of the board of the Princeton Area Community Foundation, promoting philanthropy and building community across central New Jersey. She is principal of Riverbridge Communications Consulting in Pennington, New Jersey.

1988

Jeffrey A. Richards retired from the printing and publishing industries to devote himself full-time to his hypnotherapy and comedy stage hypnosis business in Pickerington, Ohio. Jeff performs shows at schools and corporate venues throughout the Midwest and Great Lakes states.

1988

Daniel G. Rudmann now works from home in Denver for Charles River Laboratories in Ashland, Ohio. Two more family college graduations are in store in 2018. “I have also started hosting preventative health clinics for dogs and cats at rural locations across Colorado,” Dan adds, “which has been a fun adventure.” During reunion and alumni support planning he has enjoyed connecting with Lawrence J. Apke '88, Michael C. Helmstetter '88, Bradley R. Koogler '88 and Daniel C. Tobin '88.

1989

Philip B. Fisher III leads a “nomadic life,” he reports, “running a substance abuse treatment company in Florida during the week and returning to my home in Greenwich, Connecticut, to spend time with my family on the weekends. Lots of frequent-flyer miles.” Phil writes that, having spent most of his professional life in finance, it makes him feel good to work in an industry that aims to help the sick and the suffering.

1989

Peter A. Groustra, Brookline, Massachusetts, celebrates his daughter’s entrance into the freshman class this fall. “We are very excited for Sarah, and she is very excited to start her Kenyon journey,” he reports. “Kristen Bruno McClusky '89 suggested that I get a big ‘P’22’ tattoo, but I am thinking that a ‘Kenyon Parent’ coffee mug is more my speed,” he jokes.

1989

Ann E. Minner is the managing librarian at the Old Quarry Branch of the Austin Public Library and adjunct assistant professor for the School of Information at the University of Texas, teaching children’s literature. “Nothing like seeing young adults revisit ‘Charlotte’s Web’!” she writes.

1989

Darryl L. Shankle, Dover, Ohio, reports that his 29th year as a high-school teacher is winding down fast. Two of his children share the building with him, and his middle schooler is on the way. In addition to three classes of sophomore English and three of Revolutions That Changed the World, Darryl is varsity assistant girls basketball coach. The kids’ college-selection process lies ahead.

1990s

1990

Dirk A. Beamer enjoyed the 25th reunion of Jessica (Becker) Beamer ’92 in Gambier last May. Their daughter, who had Kenyon on her short list, tagged along, and last fall their sons started at Loyola Chicago and Calvin College.

1990

Patrick A. Beers lives on a 26-acre farm in Ringoes, New Jersey, with his two teenage sons, three horses, a dog and a cat. “I enjoy preserving the Nokota horses,” he writes, “wild Indian horses from North Dakota dating back to Chief Sitting Bull’s herd.”

1990

Julia Griner and her husband spent eight years in Paris but have moved back to Rome and set up a cooking school: “With Pino’s years in NYC restaurants and our catering company and private culinary education courses in France, England and Italy, it seemed natural to open our own school here in Trastevere,” she writes. “It’s a dream come true. Pop in for caffé and biscotti; Kenyon folks in Rome for 50th birthdays, we will be happy to spoil you with 50 percent off any class (grano-farina.com).”

1990

Nate Llerandi, on the cusp of the empty nest, broke ground on a home in Playa Guiones, Costa Rica, to be completed around Halloween. “We can’t wait to start splitting time between Boulder, Colorado, in the warmer months and the idyllic beach setting in the colder months,” he explains.

1990

Brian J. Uhlinger lives in central Pennsylvania near State College, expanding his wealth management practice “far beyond expectation,” he writes. “We remain ardent boaters on the Chesapeake Bay; our home port is Solomons, Maryland.”

1990

Peter A. Vanable and Anne S. Jamison ’89, Syracuse, New York, continue to enjoy living in the “snowiest major city in the U.S.” Peter was recently made dean of the Graduate School of Syracuse University. Anne teaches choral music at a private high school.

1991

Alison J. Black, Natick, Massachusetts, completed her goal of 50 marathons in 50 states in October. “I chose to finish in Maryland,” she explains, “because my uncle was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and I wanted to finish in his home state. I raised $8,000 for research. Sadly, he passed last April and didn’t get to see me cross the finish line at my final marathon, but he was aware of what I was doing and was proud.” Alison’s Ohio marathon was the Earth Rock Run Marathon at Kenyon in 2010.

1991

Chad M. Braun became chief medical officer at Equity Health, a nonprofit specializing in care for the underserved in Columbus, Ohio.

1991

Lycurgus T. “Ted” Davey, Falls Church, Virginia, is an IT manager for the U.S. Postal Service office of inspector general. “My wife and I are planning a dive trip to someplace warm,” Ted predicts, “where I’ll probably get eaten by a shark.”

1991

Cornelia “Nellie” Kurtzman, Brooklyn, New York, is vice president of marketing at HarperCollins children’s publishing. When not working on books, she is working to rescue dogs as director of marketing at Badass Brooklyn Animal Rescue.

1992

Martin J. Blackwell returned from Kazakhstan, where he set up a summer study abroad opportunity in advanced Russian for ROTC cadets. “It was crazy to be back in Almaty again after 22 years,” he writes. “Back then, I taught American history to Kazakhs. Almaty is still a Russian-language space, but the number of Slavs there is certainly dwindling.” Martin soon heads to Moscow to run the University of North Georgia’s summer abroad opportunity in Russia.

1992

Evangeline “Vonnie” Lynn Calland reports she was “lucky enough to be on campus in February when beloved Professor Royal Rhodes gave a beautiful talk on death, poetry and social justice. Truly moving. I also caught up with another beloved professor, Miriam Dean-Otting '74.” Daughter Julia will be in the Class of 2022, “and she is over the moon! Another generation lured by the Kokosing.”

1992

John R. Erskine Jr. is a district director in the Transatlantic Council of the Boy Scouts of America, residing in Brussels, Belgium. He serves military and civilian communities in the Rhineland–Palatinate area and scouting programs in Africa, the Middle East, Russia and the former Soviet republics. He was married in May and will travel Europe over the fall.

1992

David M. Hayes is a visiting research fellow at the Institute for Value Studies at the University of Winchester, UK. His daughter Betsy was born in England last November.

1992

Amanda S. Jay, Lawrence, Kansas, will leave Hill’s Pet Nutrition to start her own consulting business.

1992

Elizabeth M. Klein is a private curator who helps people buy and build art collections, using her 25 years of experience in the art world. Liz explains that she “helps clients better define their interest in modern and contemporary art so that they can develop coherent collections that will stand the test of time not only as great art but also as solid investments. From Michelangelo to Mondrian, Matta-Clark to Mehretu, I’m still inspired every day.”

1993

“My extended bachelorhood has finally come to an end; I married Amanda Webb in April 2017. During the summer I made several trips to New York City and managed to catch up with Jonathan M. Schaffer '93, M. Colleen Hopkins Grazioso ’94 and Virginia R. ‘Robin’ Gager '93.”

Colin S. Burns

1993

Michael R. Butz works in quality improvement and patient safety for a safety-net health care facility treating Chicago’s underserved communities. His wife, Gabi, teaches Italian, and he is grateful his two boys are still at home. “Looking forward to our 25th reunion, even though it’s impossible it’s been that long!”

1993

Erin Heintzelman Herbruck is director of professional development for the Shaker Heights, Ohio, City Schools. A certified yoga teacher, she coordinates yoga teacher training at a local studio. Visiting the Hill with a group of her students recently, she felt “as proud as ever to be an alum.”

1993

Matthew A. Kinney, head swim coach at Carnegie Mellon University, is active with a charitable giving organization called Forty+One, designed to encourage an hour a week of volunteering or giving.

1993

Michael J. Marshall, Athens, Georgia, was awarded a Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professorship for his work at the University of Georgia, where he is associate director of curriculum in his department. Last fall he opened a research lab called the Social Ecology Studio, “initiating and facilitating community arts projects in collaboration with science and social researchers to enhance the local ecosystem and enrich the community,” he writes.

1993

Tamara Parson made a career shift to restaurant management and now leads the team at an exciting brand new place on the public square in Mount Vernon, Ohio, called “The Joint,” a twist on a classic 1950s-style diner. “Check us out when you are in town for Reunion Weekend!” she recommends.

1993

Tanya C. Tenkarian relocated to Hollis, New Hampshire, after 15 years teaching and working with low-performing schools in Baltimore, Maryland. At her custom watercolor painting business, Charming Nest Studios, she designs special-occasion stationery and paints pet portraits. When not busy with four children, she is also writing two children’s books.

1994

Michael A. Baumholtz, San Antonio, updates that opening his own plastic surgery practice last year has been a great experience. “Kids (6 and 10) are growing fast — won’t be long before I’m taking one or both to visit Gambier.”

1994

Fiona Wallace Collins, Briarcliff Manor, New York, returned from a decade of working at home with her children to teaching third grade at Rippowam Cisqua, an independent school. Her ninth-grader and sixth-grader will accompany her to the reunion next year to start college searches.

1994

Katherine Larson Farnham is a senior architectural historian with AECOM in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Last November, she assessed damage from Hurricanes Irma and Maria to six historic government buildings in the U.S. Virgin Islands. “It was a humbling and amazing experience,” Kate reports, “sleeping in a nearly destroyed resort, flying on terrifying little planes and being serenaded by stray roosters everywhere we went.”

1994

John D. Hatfield became director of marketing and communications for Michigan State University’s Axia Institute, a cross-disciplinary research and education facility.

1994

James J. McCarthy became executive vice president and chief physician executive of the Memorial Hermann Health System after 17 years as an emergency medicine faculty member at the University of Texas. “It’s going to be a significant change stepping out of academics,” Jamie describes, “but in this new role I will oversee Memorial Hermann’s physician organization and establish a physician-centric, integrated network of care across greater Houston.”

1994

Jonathan M. Meredith is director of the middle school at Durham Academy in Durham, North Carolina. Jon updates that he coaches youth lacrosse, keeps in touch with too few of his Kenyon friends and “likes the whole farm-to-table food scene in Durham a little too much.”

1994

Sheila Pierce Ortona, San Francisco, loved visits from Claire Laverge Petitt '94, Jonathon D. Paul '94 and Peter M. Foster '94, and hopes soon to connect with Neil M. Penick III '94. “My ties to Gambier continue to be so strong,” she notes, “that I plan to pick up a puppy in Gambier in May!”

1994

Robert T. Rogers, Benicia, California, reports that he teaches American and world literature to high-school students, writes when he can and is raising two “wonderful children who want to hear poetry before they fall asleep at night.”

1995

“I finally married my long-time honey last May, and we bought a huge house we could never afford but for its being a community house. Six adults share the space, mortgage, chores, raising of chickens and permaculturing. We have a guest room: Look me up! Also in Year Two of the creation of a public Montessori high school that’s part of Denver Public Schools. It’s the coolest school in which I’ve ever worked.”

Rachel E. Balkcom

1995

Sarah Brewster, Long Beach, New York, recently got approval to expand the charter school she and her husband founded. Evergreen Charter School, serving elementary to middle school students, focuses on the environment, arts and learning a second language, Spanish.

1995

Samantha Carey and her husband are settling down in the house they bought in Washington, D.C. As their daughter is just over six months old, Sam asks: “Reading about everyone looking at colleges with their kids makes me laugh — we are crazy old parents! Would that make Emily Class of 2040?”

1995

“Proof that media companies can be crazy, E.W. Scripps has made me a VP with responsibilities ranging from risk, continuity and security to sourcing and real estate/construction. Mary M. Mason '95 continues to put up with me, and I spend what spare time I have with her or playing around in my really rather crazy wood shop.”

Michael S. Epstein, Cincinnati, Ohio

1995

Amy Collier Hensley, West Chester, Ohio, and her husband welcomed their first child, Alexander, on Feb. 13.

1995

Kimberly J. Levin, Brooklyn, New York, saw her narrative feature film “Runoff” open theatrically in 18 cities to good reviews. A year later, she welcomed her firstborn, Leomaris, with husband Kurt Pitzer, a journalist and author. She writes that she would love to hear from Kenyon friends.

1995

Jill E. Pollack, Silver Spring, Maryland, sends son Peter off to kindergarten this fall. “I continue to ply my trade at the Commerce Department in the area of trade policy,” she writes, “and I can verify that it’s never been a more interesting time to be a civil servant.”

1995

Anmol Satiani, Chicago, is a psychologist training doctoral students in clinical and counseling psychology. “I did have a private practice,” she writes, “and chose to step back in anticipation of the arrival of our twins. They are now almost 18 months old and keep my partner, Sonu, and I very busy!”

1995

Katharine B. Rucker Sears, Tampa, Florida, was selected for command of a naval aviation squadron — “a big career milestone in the Navy,” she writes. In January on Siesta Key, she and other alumni joined members of the Kenyon swim team at a beach barbecue during their training there. “After the voracious swimmers were fed, some of them braved the great divide and talked with us about professors, classes and majors. I met several international studies majors and got to talk with them about their study abroad experiences, swapping stories about China and other places we’d been in common.”

1996

Jessica C. Banks, London, England, has hosted 70 kundalini yoga events, including one with Belinda Carlisle — “she’s a kundalini yogi, too” — celebrating the launch of her pop-infused mantra album “Wilder Shores.” “She and her band played live while I taught yoga, perhaps the liveliest workshop of my teaching career,” Jessica describes.

1996

Christopher H. Eliot, Brooklyn, New York, and his wife welcomed a second daughter in March. Chris has been working as executive editor on relaunching a free-to-authors open-access academic journal titled Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology, published by the University of Michigan.

1996

Susan F. Kyle, the humanitarian attaché at the U.S. Mission to the UN, works on global refugee issues in Geneva, Switzerland, but will return to Washington, D.C., this fall. She occasionally crosses paths with alumni on hikes and travel around Europe.

1997

Jack J. Chester is still enjoying the wine world and Brooklyn, New York. “We’re about to celebrate our fifth anniversary here at Free Range Wine and Spirits,” he writes, “where we recently received three Wine-Searcher.com Retailer Awards, and we continue to be one of the highest-rated wine shops in New York.”

1997

John R. Cornely has been promoted to deputy director in charge of the trial services division of the Office of the Ohio Public Defender, supervising all trial attorneys in the office.

1997

Brian Jones, Plain City, Ohio, reports that a children’s book he illustrated, “Quackenstein Hatches a Family,” was featured on a video at Storyline Online, read by Kristen Bell. “The production values are very high,” Brian reports, “with music, sound effects, animation … and Kristen Bell reading my book! Pretty exciting stuff.”

1997

Meida T. McNeal, Chicago, won an award in dance from 3Arts, an organization “bridging social justice and the arts and providing career-spanning support to women artists, artists of color and artists with disabilities,” she reports. Meida’s Afro-feminist performance collective Honey Pot Performance received a National Endowment for the Humanities Common Heritage Grant. Her creative work with Chicago’s grassroots house music communities preserves “vital records of Chicago, American and queer of-color cultural history.”

1997

Greta N. Scharnweber will join the Institute of International Education in New York City and lead its Fulbright Scholars program. “I’ll be headed to D.C. more often, so I look forward to catching up with old friends, especially David M. Wright '97 and M.A. “Lisa” McNally Wright '97. I look forward to our annual summer gathering with Elizabeth M. Canterbury '97 and Arian Giatris Clements '97, my wonderful roommates from Bexley 101!”

1997

Kirsten M. Bauman Tychonievich, a nurse practitioner in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to the development of a certificate of advanced education in obesity medicine through the Obesity Medicine Association. With 2-year-old son Luke, she met Lora Ballinger Newman '97 and Eric S. Newman ’96 and their daughter on their way through town for a New Year’s Day meal.

1998

Renee C. (Miller) Blue, Barrington, Illinois, co-founded the nonprofit Mindful Waste, which works to eliminate food waste through education, prevention and recovery. She delivered a TEDx talk on the topic last October.

1998

Stephanie K. Levi Blumer, Chicago, got a tenure-track faculty position in biology last year at Oakton Community College, where she is able to support “a fantastic and diverse student population and conduct research on teaching and learning in the sciences in higher ed.” She celebrated her fifth wedding anniversary in April and continues traveling, having adventures and enjoying life with her husband and their “sweet beagle, Bagels.”

1998

Nicole C. (Canfield) Chance and her husband returned from their year in Brazil and settled into their new home in Middlebury, Vermont. “Let us know if you’re in the area and want to help us ‘break it in’!” she says.

1998

Jessica M. Adler Eisner and her husband moved to Spartanburg, South Carolina, closer to family, and are adjusting to Southern life and appreciating the warmer weather. “There are many things we miss about Massachusetts,” Jessi writes, “Boston sports, our favorite restaurants — but the snow is not one of them. An added bonus is that we can drive to Disney World (only eight hours) for our many trips, which include runDisney 5Ks, 10Ks and half-marathons.”

1998

Jessica A. Chew Gegogeine, Huntsville, Alabama, announces the birth of daughter Madeline in March. “We are all doing well, enjoying naps and learning a bit about being first-time parents every day!”

1998

Amanda Wagoner Meade was called to be the first female senior pastor in the 187-year history of First Christian Church of Jeffersonville, Indiana.

1998

Mandy E. Oser announces the birth of a son last September — one month early. “That made for an interesting scramble to get ready to bring him home,” she explains. “He got to meet his first Kenyon alum, Nancy Gordon Nasby '98, in January. My husband and I still own and operate our wine bar, Ardesia, located in Hell’s Kitchen, New York City.”

1998

Hebron I. Simckes-Joffe, Pasadena, California, reports that his short screenplay “Emily” is a finalist at the Sacramento Film Festival and is in contention for its coveted Lew Hunter Award. After roughly eight years’ hiatus, Hebron penned three new short scripts, all of which are nominated for best short screenplay at this year’s Beverly Hills Film Festival. Finally, his first feature film as co-director, co-producer and casting director was picked up for distribution.

1998

Andrew E. Woodward has his paintings represented by the George Billis Gallery, 525 W. 26th St., in New York City and the Arden Gallery on Newbury Street in Boston. This summer he will show at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival in Denver, the city where his charming Fifty State Animals artwork festoons electric boxes along South Colorado Boulevard. His latest book, “City: Urban Paintings,” is now available (andrewwoodward.com).

1999

Susan L. Kruman Gorman, Worthington, Ohio, welcomed her first child, a son, last November. “Benjamin and his dad came close to sharing a birthday,” she reports, “arriving two days after Mike’s.”

1999

“Last year was a whirlwind. I was married last May to my high-school sweetheart, Matt, and we have been enjoying working on improvements to our 1890s Victorian home in Utica, Ohio. In November I returned to the Hill as assistant director of annual giving. Hope to see as many classmates as possible at our reunion in 2019, but if you happen to be in Gambier before that, please stop by. My office is right next to the post office.”

Molly M. Harsh Gutridge, Utica, Ohio

1999

Mark Revermann, Chicago, is vice president of business integration at fluent360, a multicultural marketing and advertising agency focused on strategic and creative work on behalf of leading brands. In 2010, Mark and former tennis coach David Schilling launched the Wilson Collegiate Tennis Camps and have since expanded the network to 30 sites across the country, quickly becoming the No. 2 player in the industry. “One camp, of course, is at Kenyon,” he adds.

1999

Stephen M. Scott is finishing his fourth year as assistant dean of students at the University of Chicago. He and his wife continue to slowly renovate their historic home in Oak Park, Illinois. “While I do still regularly tune in to WKCO online,” he writes, “I’m embarrassed to report my musical tastes have shifted dramatically toward teen pop, thanks to the influences of our children Georgie (5) and Archer (8).”

1999

Bruno D. Trindade, Florence, Massachusetts, is “leading a double life” as a software developer and martial arts instructor, he updates. “Two lovely kids, a girl and a boy, light up my life with their intelligence and humor,” he writes. Spare time is spent repairing motorcycles and — “if I’m successful” — riding them.

1999

Mary Beth Wilson has been based in Berlin, Germany, for nine years after living in Afghanistan for three. Last October she opened a studio, Bija Yoga Berlin, and teaches multiple classes weekly, while continuing monitoring and evaluation work in international development. “If you find yourself in Berlin, get in touch.”

2000s

2000

Colby M. Genrich, Verona, New Jersey, welcomed a daughter on May 25, 2017. “Matilda is getting very good at standing, waving and driving her big brother crazy with her toy hoarding,” he reports. The family will move to El Paso, Texas, in June as Colby was accepted to a sports medicine fellowship at Texas Tech University.

2000

Katherine A. Bennett Gustafson, Chicago, welcomed the arrival of twins Teddy and Julia last May. Frequent admiring visitors include Kate’s sisters Melinda Bennett Nguyen ’07 and Elizabeth Bennett Hebbeln ’96 and her father, William E. Bennett ’68.

2000

Emily Anne Leachman is marking 12 years in Charlotte, North Carolina, three of them as librarian at Central Piedmont Community College.

2000

Kristin Ann Meister gave birth last December to a son, Cyrus. In March, her family moved down the hall in their building in New York City to an apartment that will better accommodate the new addition.

2000

Alea R. Vorillas joined RE/MAX Classic Realty in Somers, New York, serving the real estate needs of buyers and sellers in Westchester, Putnam and the greater NYC area. She recently obtained her mortgage loan originator license, and as a silver-tier agent with Redfin closed over 90 deals in a short time span. A mother of two, she also performs in local theaters playing Mary Magdalene in “Jesus Christ Superstar” and Maria in “West Side Story” this April and May.

2000

Marela Zacarias married Weston C. Pew ’01 in 2014 and now has a son, Mateo. “I have stayed really busy as a full-time artist working and living in Brooklyn, New York, and Mexico City,” she updates. “I am currently creating a large-scale, site-specific structure for a Frank Gehry-designed building for Facebook headquarters, as well as the design and planning of seven monumental permanent sculptures for the state-of-the-art new international terminal at Seattle-Tacoma Airport. My work is represented by Praxis Gallery in New York, Calvin Charles Gallery in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Galeria Alterna in Mexico City.”

2001

Elizabeth E. Foy, Nashville, Tennessee, welcomed daughter Hailey to the family last November. Elizabeth left the Davidson County district attorney’s office after 10 years and started working for Liberty Mutual Insurance.

2001

Beth A. Harrod is in an accelerated bachelor of nursing program at Cleveland State University and plans to work as a pediatric cardiac nurse.

2001

Jesse B. Horowitz, Golden Valley, Minnesota, was promoted to executive vice president at Wells Fargo. He and Ariel Nonberg Horowitz ’05 celebrated their 10th anniversary, son Henry started kindergarten and 3-year-old Naomi is “a source of immense joy.”

2001

Frederick R. “Fritz” Horstman, Bethany, Connecticut, is working on a large sculpture that will be permanently installed in a forest in Ås, Norway, this summer.

2001

Jennifer M. McDevitt recently relocated to New York City to serve as senior pastor and head of staff at Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church. In the congregation’s 109-year history, Jenny is the first woman elected to the position.

2001

Anne Douglass Peers, Olalla, Washington, celebrated the birth of her second child, Xavier. She works as a mental health therapist in private practice outside Seattle.

2001

Aryakorn Joy Phaphouvaninh was named director of Illinois Abroad and Global Exchange, the campus study abroad office at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Joy writes: “I look fondly on my time at Kenyon and believe that the encouragement from faculty to integrate international perspective into my studies and to study abroad led me to where I am professionally today.”

2001

Sr. Jeana M. Visel, Ferdinand, Indiana, oversees nonseminary programs at Saint Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology and welcomes alumni interested in a master’s in theology. Her vocal quartet — two Benedictine monks, one Benedictine sister and one Ursuline sister — tentatively goes by the moniker Brothers and Sisters: “Imagine an SATB version of Anonymous Four,” she explains.

2001

Michael A. White updates: “After nearly 14 years OCONUS” — that’s outside the continental United States for us nonmilitary folks — “I’ve moved back to the lower 48 and settled in Coral Gables, Florida. At the U.S. Southern Command I am the country officer for Argentina, Chile and Uruguay. It’s strange to be back in the States, but nice.”

2002

Eleanna Anagnos, Brooklyn, New York, received a Yaddo fellowship in 2017. Last summer she was commissioned to do a work of art for dOGUMENTA, the world’s first public art exhibition for dogs, profiled in the New York Times. “Four thousand dogs attended in four days,” she reports. “Last fall I served as a visiting professor of art at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and made artwork for two solo exhibitions in January. I continue to serve as a director at the artist-run collective Ortega y Gasset Projects. After living in NYC for over a decade, I have gallery representation from High Noon Gallery in the Lower East Side.”

2002

Kristofer D. Cheney and Stephanie E. Cutts Cheney ’04 offered this poignant Hurricane Harvey recovery recap from Houston: “So incredibly thankful for all of the support we received from Kenyon family. While we lost most of our house, we didn’t lose our home. Kenyon is our home. The people from Kenyon are our family. It is the place where we learned about the world and which taught us who we wanted to be. We had offers of places to stay from Kenyon alumni we didn’t know. People offered to physically come help us. Kenyon friends, classmates and current students raised money to help with our expenses while we are working to repair our home. Thank you all so much.”

2002

Lauren E. Coil-Sherck, Plymouth, Indiana, works at Culver Academies. She is enjoying running her three girls (7, 5 and 2) to and from school and activities.

2002

Samuel K. Franklin welcomed a son in January 2017 and moved to the San Francisco Bay area last May.

2002

Marian L. Frazier is now assistant professor of mathematics at the College of Wooster. “Even though I now work for an NCAC competitor,” she writes, “I wear my Kenyon colors proudly. I’ve got a giant Kenyon banner and a picture of the science quad in my office.”

2002

Katherine E. (Allen) Godwin moved with her husband to Wellington, New Zealand, where he took a role at WETA Digital as a senior look development VFX lighter on feature films. “We are really enjoying our time exploring New Zealand,” Katie informs, “and expect to be back in Los Angeles sometime this summer.”

2002

Devon N. Riester moved to Oak Park, Illinois, and entered the “thrilling and slightly unpredictable world of raising ‘two under 2,’” she writes, since the January birth of daughter Avery. “Visit us this summer!”

2002

Roger M. Schwartz has been in Los Angeles for 10 years and is making the transition from film production work into becoming a licensed psychologist. “It’s a tough but exciting time,” he says.

2002

Mairin McCarthy Weiner and her husband welcomed a son last spring in San Francisco. “His big sisters (5 and 8) adore him, and we are loving the happy chaos.”

2002

Dana L. Whitney, Annandale, Virginia, completed a master of public administration in December and was to finish a certificate in nonprofit management this May, both at George Mason University. “It was a positive experience,” she writes, “and I enjoyed being in academia again.”

2003

Alisha R. Dall’Osto celebrated her 11th anniversary living in Seattle. Son Leo is almost 2. After 12 years working as an artist, Alisha is halfway through earning an M.P.A. and looking forward to a new career in public policy and community economic development.

2003

Thomas A. Evans, Little Compton, Rhode Island, enjoys challenging work at a niche textile company and is in the middle of completing a partially constructed house he bought in 2017. Tom adds that he has been “regularly attending Kenyon matrimony reunion parties (aka weddings).”

2003

Jessica S. D’Ardenne Tsuda, Denver, welcomed a third child in October. “Baby Kai will join me at our 15-year reunion!” She and her husband are attorneys.

2003

E. Brooks Upham is partway through a master’s in palliative care for nurse practitioners at New York University. Second child Naomi arrived in December — “a beautiful girl but a bad sleeper.”

2004

Eugene T. “Trey” Blair III is now head of lower school at Fort Worth Country Day, the oldest co-ed college preparatory school in Fort Worth, Texas. He oversees 42 faculty members and 350 students in grades K-4, and has taught and coached baseball there for five years.

2004

Phoebe L. Cohen and her son have moved from Florida to Massachusetts, where Phoebe works as a paramedic. They are “very much enjoying the deliciously new weather, though the multiple nor’easters with accompanying power outages are tiring,” she writes.

2004

Amanda Hollander moved from Los Angeles to Brooklyn, New York, and is an assistant professor of children’s literature. Also a librettist, her first opera, “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” with composer Nicky Sohn, premiered in workshops in Los Angeles this spring.

2004

Matthew R. Howard, Chicago, completed nursing school, worked at the Cleveland Clinic and now is an educator for the University of Chicago’s information systems team. This spring he began graduate studies there in biomedical informatics. “I recently reviewed my Kenyon transcripts for graduate school applications,” he muses, “and immediately thought, ‘Wow, I regret not working harder while there!’ Though what a great time in my life in retrospect. I will redeem my academic side on this one!”

2004

Leeman (Richardson) Kessler was sworn in as one of Gambier’s newest Village Council members. As a student plodding from the Freshman Quad to Hill Theatre, he recalls, he had no idea he’d one day be a part of making decisions about how the village and the college work together and what an honor it would be. Meanwhile, he supports his wife Rachel C. Kessler’s family ministry at Harcourt Parish, raises two kids and finds time to impersonate Carl Sagan for the local Chautauqua series.

2004

Brady A. Kosnik Launder and Cody Launder '04 live in Santa Monica, California, with daughter Lucy. Brady is director of preschool programs at Piper Preschool and recently appeared as the preschool teacher on “The Secret Life of Kids,” a reality TV show on USA network that gives viewers a comedic insight into the life of kids as they approach topics such as love, hate, relationships and lying, all caught on hidden cameras.

2004

Cecelia A. “Clare” Norwood, Cincinnati, works in historic restoration, bringing old buildings back to life, she informs. “I spend most of my free time running and training for marathons and renovating a total gut rehab that I purchased a few months ago,” Clare writes. “I live in the attic and work on the rest of the house at night and on the weekends.”

2004

Marjorie L. “Maggie” Rathgeber and Daniel Harrell were married on March 3. They reside in Baltimore.

2004

Amanda N. Samponaro Runne and John H. Runne ’05 and big brother Nicholas welcomed daughter Zoe to the family home in Brooklyn, New York, in November.

2004

Paul A. Schmid and Margaret McNamara Schmid ’06 celebrated the arrival of Quin on Oct. 11. “Maggie is taking a few months off before returning to her job as a health care attorney,” Paul writes. “I’m continuing to specialize in M&A and venture capital transactions at a law firm in Boston.”

2004

Mary W. Thuell closed her solo firm and started work as an ERISA associate at Mooney, Green, Saindon, Murphy & Welch, a union-side labor firm in Washington, D.C.

2004

Sarah Olivia-Fisher Wild lives in London with wife Ruth Crowell Wild ’02. In November they welcomed their second son, Charlie, who “has kept things interesting; so far his big brother, Alfie, has enjoyed having him around.” Sarah freelances in advertising, and she and Ruth travel around Europe as much as possible — with “destinations changed slightly now that we have two little ones in tow.”

2005

Amanda A. (Carpenter) Aita, Corning, New York, welcomed third child Evan in February 2017; he joins his sister (6) and brother (10). “I’m still having a wonderful time in my full-time Bible ministry,” she writes, “slowing down for each pregnancy, then picking back up. Lots of blessings!”

2005

Lindsay M. Junkin Henry celebrated the arrival of a son on Jan. 4. “Luke is happy and healthy, and Eric and I are over the moon!” The family moved out of Manhattan and into its new home in Southport, Connecticut, last year.

2005

Ferrial H. Lanton is an attorney in the Washington, D.C., area. He and his husband, Andrew, became certified sailors through the U.S. Sailing Association and joined the Annapolis Yacht Club. They participate in its Wednesday night races and look forward to this year’s Annapolis-Newport Regatta.

2005

Alexandra O. “Sasha” Poll McConnell and Casey S. McConnell ’06 are still in Washington, D.C., where she took a position as senior specialist with the humanitarian response team of Save the Children. She has been primarily focused on recovery work in Puerto Rico. Casey and their 1-year-old son, Jack, traveled with her there in March.

2005

Nadia Reiman, Brooklyn, New York, joined the team at radio program “This American Life.” She urges, “You should all pitch me your stories!”

2005

Jennifer M. Underwood opened her own child and family psychotherapy practice in Grayslake, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. Her kids (3 and 6), Jen writes, “continue to grow and talk. And talk. And talk.”

2005

Benjamin P. Woodcock and Amanda C. Schermer Woodcock ’09, Shaker Heights, Ohio, have two girls, ages 3 and 1. Ben was promoted to vice president/relationship manager at Key Private Bank and runs its wealth management program for the Cleveland Clinic. Amanda is completing her master’s in clinical mental health counseling from Cleveland State.

2006

Kathryn L. Zeanah is a school psychologist in South-Western City Schools outside Columbus, Ohio. In October, daughter Ruby arrived, joining big brother Henry. “We all couldn’t be more smitten,” Katy writes, “and my wife and I are using Ruby’s smiles and giggles to power us through some sleepless nights.”

2006

Rachel E. Chun-Kennedy updates that she is “happily settled in our new nest in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.” She co-owns a small business that she started with her mother, NLC Tours, a “local receptive tour agency that books customized tour packages for groups coming to see historic Gettysburg,” she writes. “We work mainly with student groups but also do retail or adult tours. If you’re a teacher planning a school trip, please reach out for more information — a great stop on the way to Washington, D.C., or Philadelphia.”

2006

Weronika Kowalczyk Costas and Henry Costas Nunez are growing their immigration law practice in Cleveland. “We continue fighting for our clients’ rights in these crazy immigration times we’re living in,” she writes. “Henry — entrepreneur to the core — has also opened up a construction/remodeling business (216 Contractors) as well as a futsal (indoor soccer) academy, while at the same time coaching our 7-year-old son to become the next Messi.”

2006

Joanna M. Gohmann, Washington, D.C., welcomed a son, Alexander, on Oct. 29. “Laura R. Seckel '06 is his godmother,” she adds.

2006

Christopher F. Loud celebrated the arrival of a daughter on Feb. 10 in Traverse City, Michigan, and writes, “Fiona is in the 99.5th percentile in length, so we’re thinking Kenyon volleyball, but we’re also open to tallest female U.S. president in history. Send food.”

2006

Kathryn E. Cameron McMillan, Chicago, took a six-month maternity leave to spend time with second son Peter, born in 2017. Last fall, Katy returned to Kids Science Labs and moved out of the classroom after six years of teaching science; she now manages the company’s purchasing process.

2006

Brendan C. McNamara, Washington, D.C., is an attorney at Fried Frank, focusing on antitrust and government contracts issues. Last September, he and Brooke A. Rockwern ’08 welcomed “first child and (hopefully) future Kenyon alum Samuel.”

2006

George C. Williams IV, Boyce, Virginia, was blessed with a daughter on March 12.

2007

Kristin E. Moe informs that she is working on an M.F.A. in theater at Naropa University in Colorado with the intention of blending arts education and social-change work.

2007

John A. Compton celebrated his fifth year developing and writing role-playing games with Paizo, Inc. in Redmond, Washington. He also contributed story material and adventure design for the upcoming “Pathfinder: Kingmaker” video game.

2007

Erin M. Ellingwood married Yuval Shavit at Cambridge City Hall in Massachusetts in 2016 and celebrated with a reception last July at the Cincinnati Nature Center. They were “delighted to party,” she writes, with Adrienne Boris '07, Margaret Willison '07, Deanna Lesht '07 and Nathaniel J. Ewert-Krocker '07, along with friends and family from all over the U.S. and Israel.

2007

Margaret Niehaus-Sauter Fuchs and Andrew F. Fuchs ’03 reside in Rochester, Minnesota. Andy starts a master of education in mathematics in June at the University of Minnesota, and Margaret completes her cardiology fellowship. In July, she begins her last fellowship in adult congenital heart disease at the Mayo Clinic. “We are running out of advanced degrees to pursue and may have to get full-time adult jobs in the future!” she adds.

2007

Jeffrey N. Gardner, Chicago, ends 10 years with the Museum of Science and Industry this September and will pursue a master’s in sound arts and industries. Jeff’s audio podcast “Our Fair City” will end in July; he’ll begin a new show titled “Unwell: A Midwestern Gothic Mystery,” a serial drama about memory, ghosts and small-town Ohio living.

2007

Richard E. Marinos finished his doctorate in environmental science at Duke, and Cari D. Ficken ’09 also finished her ecology doctorate. The couple had a baby girl in November and will move to the Toronto area to take postdoctoral research positions.

2007

Loren J. Rotner earned his doctorate in political science from Claremont Graduate University. He has just begun working as special assistant to the president of St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland.

2007

Stuart H. Schisgall, Chicago, works at Abelson Taylor as a senior digital marketing strategist optimizing websites for pharmaceutical drugs. “I’m headed to China with Ira M. Ochs '07 for a couple weeks to explore Beijing, the terra cotta warriors and Shanghai,” he notes. “I’m relying on Ira’s linguistic skills to get by — and my charm.”

2007

Elizabeth Howe Stanton and William G. Stanton ’08 live in Boulder, Colorado. Daughter Eva was born in December; their son, Cole, is 3. Elizabeth works as a division director of patient experience for HCA, and Will is principal data scientist for VictorOps.

2008

John D. Bence, Atlanta, writes that he is “sliding into my fifth year as university archivist at Emory University and just returned from a trip to Cuba!”

2008

Emily F. Bierman and Adam J. Sonnefeld '08 welcomed a baby girl to their family in January: “Elsie is silly and sweet,” Emily describes, “and thankfully so far has neither of her parents’ noses.” They look forward to attending her Kenyon graduation in 2040 along with Max J. Goldman '08 and his daughter. In Greenwich, Connecticut, Emily teaches history, and Adam works in film production while pursuing an M.B.A. at Columbia University.

2008

Christopher R. Chanock graduated from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 2017 and was matched in pediatrics at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia.

2008

“Discovered my new calling as a vagrant visiting Russian professor at liberal arts schools in Massachusetts that begin with W: Moving on from Wellesley to Williams.”

Jason A. Cieply

2008

Thomas “T.D.” Dickson and Kayla E. Cushner ’10 celebrate the birth of a son, born at 3 a.m. the morning after Thanksgiving, with Brian Handley Dow '08 serving as the family’s doula.

2008

Rachel B. Kauppila started a master’s at George Washington University in clinical rehabilitation counseling, preparing her to serve adults with disabilities, specifically mental illness, and help them pursue employment. The online graduate program allows her to remain employed at Vermont Works for Women, where she helps women with employment barriers find jobs. She highly recommends the Kenyon job shadow program; hosting a current student in December was “fantastic.”

2008

Karen E. Singerman Martin and Stewart H. Martin '08 moved to Cincinnati last summer when she accepted the role of executive director at Rockdale Temple. Stewart works for JVS, and they bought a house.

2008

Anthony C. Masterson, Los Angeles, started his fourth year as the lead Major League Baseball researcher for FOX Sports 1. He and his wife will honeymoon in Europe this summer.

2008

Elly D. Deutch Moody, Chicago, was married on Oct. 15. She and Brent look forward to seeing everyone at the 10-year reunion.

2008

Michelle L. Parver and David W. Lenkner '08 welcomed a daughter, Nora, in May 2017 to their Pittsburgh home. Shelly works in philanthropy, and David is an engineer at a self-driving car company. “Let us know if yinz are ever in tahn (as they say in Pittsburgh),” she adds.

2008

Adam T. Petherbridge, Brooklyn, New York, updates: “I’ve been fortunate to spend almost the entire last year working onstage in theaters around the country and to have received a few award nominations for that work along the way. In Brooklyn, I brew a lot of beer and run one of the largest savory pie companies in the country.”

2008

Ellen E. Pierson was married on Oct. 7, 2017, with numerous classmates in attendance. “Many thanks to Sean P. Ryan '08 for leading the ceremony,” Ellen adds.

2008

Jessie L. Rubenstein, Phoenix, teaches Jewish studies to third- through eighth-graders at Pardes Jewish Day School. “I’ve also entered a master’s program at Hebrew College,” she writes, “a dual degree in Jewish education and Jewish studies.”

2008

Christopher P. Santagate, Columbus, Ohio, and his wife welcomed Felicity Blaire to their family in July 2017.

2009

Rowan E. Beaird, Chicago, won the 2017 Ploughshares Emerging Writer’s Contest in fiction. Her story, “Perennial,” was published in the literary journal’s winter issue. Judge Garth Greenwell praised her “delicate, psychologically penetrating story (on) the derangement of grief.” Rowan told Ploughshares, “I’ve always been obsessed with Joan Didion’s articulation of ‘the ordinary instant’ when someone’s life changes, when you lose something you can never regain.” Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The American Literary Review, Puerto del Sol and Compose, among others, and her story “Cassiopeia” was nominated for a Pushcart.

2009

Cari D. Ficken and Richard E. Marinos welcomed baby Lillian to their home and find “new parenthood twice as difficult but four times as wonderful as expected,” she writes. “Conquering sleep deprivation, I received my doctorate in ecology and will move to Waterloo, Canada, for postdoctoral work.”

2009

Andrew K. Henry is facilities director at the University of Akron. Andy and his wife welcomed daughter Peyton to the household on Oct. 4.

2009

Matthew H. Jacobson joined the Miami office of Carlton Fields in its real estate and commercial finance practice group, where he will handle complex real estate transactions and litigation matters for his clients.

2009

Nina L. Holmberg O’Keefe and William F. O’Keefe III ’07, Minneapolis, had a son on Nov. 6. Nina is “totally crushing it as a working mom at the digital agency Clockwork,” she writes, “if by ‘crushing it’ one means ‘battling major impostor syndrome while the persistent hum of societally imposed maternal guilt drones on in the background.’”

2009

Linda T. Pear and Daniel A. Takacs welcomed their daughter Greta to the world on Christmas Eve. “Fingers crossed that she will be Kenyon Class of 2040!” they add.

2009

Lovey H.M. Walker Peissig is a leadership development and talent assessment consultant at the University of Minnesota and an adjunct faculty member in its psychology department. “I’m looking forward to taking my family on more island adventures this year, including Sanibel and Oahu,” she informs.

2009

Elizabeth Scheltens relocated from Washington, D.C., to Columbus, Ohio, continuing her work as a video producer at Vox.com covering domestic policy and economics. Liz gets to see fellow Ohioans Hannah Rose Sacks ’08, Anne K. Severe Karp ’10 and Anneke N.S. Mason ’10 regularly.

2009

Melissa A. King Weimer welcomed a second child on Oct. 19 and reports: “Mom and Everett (’40) are doing well. Camilla (’38) loves her little brother. I went back to work in February and am enjoying my new assignment. If you are in Cincinnati, reach out!”

2009

Emily M. Wilt is in her second year as a high-school library media specialist and “loves the job, because when you’re a librarian, everything you do is professional development,” she explains. She and her husband are excited first-time homeowners in northwestern Indiana and “can’t wait to start this year’s garden in her very own dirt.”

2009

Riley L. Witte enjoys Fairbanks, Alaska — but “climate change is warming the Arctic really fast,” she notes, so she encourages all her classmates to “come see the North ASAP, before the permafrost melts.” For six years, she has been a phlebotomist at a hospital that serves the northern half of Alaska. Although never officially in her post-Kenyon plans, phlebotomy is a fascinating way to meet people, she reports, and she gets the vein most of the time.

2010s

2010

“I’m back in central Ohio and loving it! I’ve started my own organic vegetable farm 30 minutes outside of Columbus called Front Axle Farm. Come say hello if you’re in the neighborhood!”

Evan L. Axelbaum

2010

Matthew P. Colburn launched YouTube.com/ColburnClassroom, an educational channel for students in community college composition classes. Matt explains, “I post two-minute lectures on subjects such as how to write a thesis and the difference between summary and analysis. My goal is to reach 1,000 subscribers before 2019.”

2010

Mollie Ferro-Hart began her M.B.A. at Columbia Business School.

2010

Nicholas A.C. Kessler will move with Julia R. Billings ’11 to Hanover, New Hampshire, this fall to start an M.B.A. at the Tuck School of Business. Nick suggests, “If any fellow Lords/Ladies find themselves in the Upper Valley over the next two years, let’s grab a beer!”

2010

Alexandra C. Shaeffer is finishing her doctorate and headed this fall to Nazarbayev University in Astana, Kazakhstan, to teach applied linguistics and advanced French/Francophone culture and civilization courses as an assistant professor of languages, linguistics and literatures.

2010

Michelle A. von Hirschberg celebrated seven years with Jacobs Engineering in Cincinnati last year and transitioned to a new role as inside sales manager. Her winter vacation to Ontario’s Georgian Bay involved hiking on ice and catching up on books, and she looks forward to gardening, running her first 10K and getting together with Anne K. Severe Karp '10, among others.

2011

Elizabeth W. Chabot, Durham, North Carolina, has a day job as an HR/ops/admin for a local tech company while remaining busy as a weaver and fiber artist. Liza completed a two-month exhibit of “Penelope’s Room,” a “huge, woven, interactive installation for 21c Museum Hotel,” she reports. Next up is a collaboration with Knud Adams ’09 on three woven panels that will form the set of his latest play, “Aloha, Aloha, Or When I Was Queen,” at the Abrons Arts Center in New York City.

2011

Kara G. (Pellegrino) Crowther, Norwalk, Connecticut, welcomed son Maxwell into the world on Oct. 2. He joins older brother Benjamin.

2011

Carling M. Fitzsimmons conducted the William Ferris Chorale in Chicago in a concert in December, with another scheduled for May 5. “Both programs featured the work of former professor Victoria Malawey,” she writes, “and were definitely influenced by my time as a Chamber Singer!” Her women’s vocal ensemble, La Caccina, was awarded 501(c)3 status this year.

2011

Richard K. Freund is working toward his M.A. at the Fletcher School at Tufts for the rest of 2018, looking forward to “re-graduating” and moving to New York next year, he updates.

2011

Nicholas P. Loud and his brother Christopher F. Loud ’06 are working on the spring issue of The Boardman Review, a print and digital journal highlighting creative and innovative people in northern Michigan, he reports. A trip to Los Angeles for a month allowed Nick time with the “stellar Kenyon-in-LA crew,” he adds.

2011

Casey E. McKone is busy as a nurse practitioner in internal medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. “On days off I’m working on projects around my 1920s home or grabbing beers with Kenyon friends in Cleveland,” he notes.

2011

Marco A. Saavedra has seen La Morada, his family restaurant in the South Bronx, receive numerous accolades recently in the New Yorker, New York Times, Michelin Guide and New York magazine. His younger sister and sous chef competed on the Food Network’s “Chopped” on their behalf. “It’s been joyful to welcome classmates to our spot,” he writes, “including Rohit Sudarshan '11, Ayesha Akhtar '11, Richard F. Benes '11, Patrick R. Kanaley '11, Zerlina Leung '11, Joseph J. Johnston ’10 and John C. “Jay” Cocks Jr. ’66 — apologies if I’ve forgotten anyone!”

2011

Erin R. Schaff continues freelancing as a photojournalist covering Capitol Hill and national news stories for the New York Times, Washington Post, UPI and other organizations. “Over the past few months,” she writes, “it’s been fun to catch up with my Kenyon housemate Bryn T. Stole '11 now that he’s a print reporter covering Capitol Hill.”

2011

Melanie J. Papai Szucs, Grand Rapids, Michigan, reports that her golden retriever, Luna, joined her counseling practice. “It has been fun to see the research on the benefits of animals for healing bear out in my practice,” she explains. “It is not yet clear who is more excited, though: my clients or my co-workers.”

2011

Lauren M. Maggart Stearns and Tyler J. Stearns returned to New England last year with 1-year-old son Kieran, the “world’s happiest baby (with a mischievous streak a mile wide),” she writes. Visitors have included Ashley G. Gray '11, Abby B. Lagrow '11 and Laura A. Briskman '11. The Stearnses met Alexandra M. “Allie” Lawyer Skapes '11 in Boston in February and enjoy postcard updates from Claire P. Strom '11. Lauren teaches sixth-grade English and seventh-grade drama while Tyler is a clinical pharmacy specialist in mental health at the VA.

2011

Margaret J. Wardrop and Katrina S. “Trina” Rennie '11, along with other alumni, have started a Kenyon Women in Business group in New York City.

2012

Sally A. Wilson updates: “Still in Africa, mostly Mozambique, working in the national parks. When in Maputo, I make organic soaps and tend chickens.”

2012

Charlotte Bea Woolf, Rye Brook, New York, graduates from the SUNY-Purchase College of Art+Design with an M.F.A. in visual art this spring. Last year she attended SOMA’s Summer Residency in Mexico City. Her long-term project, “More Water Under the Bridge,” she explains, “responds to her father’s death by interweaving personal photographs with the archive of her family’s construction company (charlottewoolf.com).”

2012

Reilly M. Brock works in marketing at Imperfect Produce in Oakland, California, fighting food waste and making healthy fruit and vegetables more affordable and accessible by finding a home for produce “too ugly” for grocery stores, he writes.

2012

Caitlin Cook works on music, comedy and art in Brooklyn, New York. In April she traveled to the Melbourne Comedy Festival and visited Kenyon folk in Australia and New Zealand. Every month she writes, records, mixes, masters and releases a new song as part of her Grand Pacific Series. She adds: “I’ve been designing a lot of wedding invitations, programs, signage and so on like I did for Vivian J. Buchanan Jablonski '12 and started turning my design-a-day Instagram series #illustratingbandnames into coasters, posters and more. Suggestions welcome!”

2012

Caroline K. (Gruman) Furste now works in business development in the Chicago office of Mayer Brown. “The best part is working with Irene M. Wilburn '12,” Callie writes, “an attorney at the firm. We’ve come a long way since our days cramming for exams at Olin … but then again it feels a bit like we’ve come full circle!”

2012

Nicholas T. Hargreaves-Heald started a master’s at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy last fall. Nico researches irregular warfare, non-state armed groups and innovations in asymmetric conflict. After graduation in 2019, he hopes to secure employment with an intelligence organization or think tank in Washington, D.C. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with his girlfriend, Claire R. Dutton ’14.

2012

Sarah L. Bush Hechler and Jeffrey A. Hechler were married at her family’s cottage in Old Mission, Michigan, on Aug. 12 in “what was truly a magical, unforgettable weekend of friendship and laughter, which of course featured a bucket,” she writes. “Susan M. Livermore '12 and Trevor W. Ezell '12 were in our bridal party. Robert D. Fine '12, Nathan W. Huey ’13 and Tristan J. Neviska ’13 also participated.” Sarah and Jeff now reside in Ann Arbor, where Sarah — new University of Michigan master’s in educational studies in hand — teaches high-school economics, U.S. history and government.

2012

Joseph A.D. Lerangis spent three more years in Ulaanbataar, Mongolia, after his Fulbright. There, he founded an instrumental and vocal music program in an international school, working with the LGBT Centre of Mongolia, and was a finalist on Mongolia’s national television show “Universe Best Songs” (Mongolia’s version of “American Idol”). Joe is now studying for his master’s in choral conducting at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.

2012

Kimberly M. Qualls moved to Atlanta to pursue an M.B.A. at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School. “I was thrilled to be named a Goizueta Foundation Scholar and awarded a full-tuition scholarship,” she reports. “I am so grateful that my Kenyon experience helped prepare me to face this new challenge.”

2012

Robert R. Yee is the head brewer for Widmer Brothers Brewing in Portland, Oregon. He got married last July and recently bought a house.

2013

Thomas P. Brown, Washington, D.C., updates that after four years working in the U.S. Senate, he is thrilled to have a position working with his hometown congressman.

2013

Jacob M. Fishbein, Brooklyn, New York, reports that Experience Vinyl “has run its course, and we’re in the process of selling the company. I’m focusing on the second draft of my novel, doing a lot of cooking with William S. Friedlander ’14, and preparing for a contribution trip to Haiti with my men’s group, the Dudes of Disruption.”

2013

Rachel L. Gorsky completed a master’s in sociology of education with a concentration in quantitative analysis, qualifying her to “sit behind a computer and crunch numbers for the rest of her days,” she jokes.

2013

Hannah G. Hathaway describes teaching elementary special education in Chicago’s public schools: “Even though I get bitten, kicked, licked (that actually happened), called names (some of them are actually kind of funny), etc. on a daily basis, I still think I have the best students ever and enjoy teaching (most of the time!).” Hannah is passionate about teaching struggling readers and is acquiring certification as a dyslexia specialist.

2013

Sarah E. Krumholz lives and works in Florissant, Colorado, as director of the High Trails Outdoor Education Center, which brings sixth-graders and their teachers from across the state for a week exploring the woods. She climbs in the surrounding canyons with James T. Plunkett '13 whenever the opportunity arises.

2013

“I started my civilian service — the yearlong service at a public/nonprofit institution offered as an alternative to compulsory military service in Finland — living in a dorm at a camp in the countryside and taking classes in first aid, history of pacifism and prevention of violence. After that I started work at the reference desk in the city library of Pori, Finland. Everything I learned from Kenyon librarians as a reference intern senior year has been priceless. When I finish in December, my plans are pretty open — I still have my old job but haven’t decided whether to move closer to my parents, closer to Helsinki or maybe abroad again.”

Ville M. Lampi

2013

Liliana E. Martinez lives in Dubai, working as a security specialist at International SOS and Control Risks, advising clients on travel risk around the Middle East and Africa. She gets to use her nine years of Arabic (started at Kenyon!) and background in Middle East studies. This spring she traveled to Thailand.

2013

Laura C. McHenry, Portland, Oregon, was in Kenya for two months with the Elephants and Bees Project, which works to reduce human-elephant conflict through the clever application of beehive fences.

2013

Adrian E. Natale, East Haddam, Connecticut, currently teaches middle school French and Spanish but is thrilled to have been accepted to Yale’s master’s program in archaeology for this fall.

2013

William J. Plaschke, Joplin, Missouri, who teaches middle- and high-school English, recently presented at the National Council of Teachers of English convention. Last summer, he won a fellowship at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, to research the intersection of poetry and art. Willie reports that his favorite discovery was the work of Kenneth Patchen, an Ohio native.

2013

Marcia Schwartz traveled to Miami, Florida; Guayaquil, Ecuador; and Guadalajara and Cuernavaca, Mexico, last year on a team working on the first phase II Zika vaccine clinical trial. “When I’m not presenting on public health while covered in bug spray,” Marcie writes, “I’m learning the ukulele and still working on that perfect mixture of stage blood for the local theater scene.”

2013

Ian M. Watt graduated from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in 2017 and took the bar exam in July. In September he married Leanna Burckley ’12.

2014

Lauren E. Anderson relocated to Rhode Island in November and serves as an Americorps/VISTA volunteer through the Swearer Center for Public Service at Brown University. She’s loving Providence and its diverse neighborhoods, she reports, and encourages alums to meet her for coffee at White Electric.

2014

Gregory T. Culley moved across Chicago to the Bucktown neighborhood with his partner, Mark Thomson. After three seasons at the daytime talk show “Steve Harvey,” Gregory now freelances in television and film as a graphic and set designer, and also works part time at Patagonia. He most recently worked in the Dublin studio of Annie Atkins (graphic designer of Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel” and “Isle of Dogs,” and Steven Spielberg’s “Bridge of Spies”) helping re-create graphic film props for her forthcoming book.

2014

Aaron J. Dripps married Dr. Carlos Agueta on Oct. 20 in Chicago. In February he became executive assistant to the president of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, publisher of a journal focused on nuclear weapons and disarmament, climate change and emerging technologies.

2014

“Hi friends! I’m still in China — Shanghai, specifically — and haven’t written a class note since graduating, but now I’m starting to feel old and nostalgic. Shanghai’s great; come visit me.”

Zolzaya “Zoey” Erdenebileg, Shanghai, China

2014

Leland T. Holcomb found himself back in Hartford, Connecticut, after a whirlwind 2017. After reconnecting with family and old friends, he started working for Startupbootcamp, getting insurtech startups ready for investment and connected with strategic investors.

2014

Nathaniel W. Lotze bought a 118-year-old brick row home in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, with Autumn R. Anderson '14. “Compared to Old Kenyon,” Nate jokes, “it’s basically brand-new.” Nate adds that he still doesn’t really understand what escrow is.

2014

Catherine M. (Weitzel) Nortell works as the healthy planet epic analyst for Asante Health System in “gorgeous southwest Oregon,” she reports. “I build population health clinical workflows for longitudinal care management and assist with data analytics. In my free time I hike and visit the wineries in the Rogue Valley. Pinot, anyone?”

2014

Kelsey T. Rice studies interactive media and games at the University of Southern California’s film school, with projects ranging from a virtual reality cooperative space combat game to a narrative game with player voice input. Her augmented-reality storybook app “What Is It But a Dream” was an official selection at Indiecade 2017 and won the 2017 USC Libraries Wonderland Award for works inspired by Lewis Carroll.

2015

Rachel J. Hall started working in December at Refinery29, a digital media and entertainment company focused on young women.

2015

Robert L. “Luke” Kresslein, Riverside, California, doing entomology graduate studies, studies Coccophaginae, a subfamily of parasitoid wasps. His research will take him to the British Natural History Museum, as well as to Prague and Italy, this summer. In his free time, Luke enjoys teaching ballroom and Latin dance.

2015

Javier Leung, Helsinki, Finland, a software developer, plays regular jazz gigs and now does improv theater, training with an amateur hobby group called Not a Hospital. In January he backpacked Sri Lanka for a week and met Timothy M. Broderick ’16 and Benjamin C. Golombek ’15 in Hong Kong, his hometown.

2015

Lucie A. Levine started Archive on Parade, a historical tour and event company in New York City, leading walking tours, giving lectures, creating trivia nights and writing about the fascinating tales she finds. “I love sharing New York’s hidden stories,” she writes, “so if anyone would like to hop on the tour, let me know!”

2015

Shruti R. “Rekha” Mohan, West Hollywood, California, works for an entertainment ad agency, this year on the digital/social media campaign for the new Jurassic World movie — meaning she “spends a lot more time looking at GIFs of Jeff Goldblum than she ever thought she would,” she reports. She takes improv classes, writes and performs on a sketch comedy team, writes for a web series that premiered on Amazon in March and laments that not a single Angeleno seems capable of navigating a four-way stop.

2015

Christine A. Prevas is finishing a master of philosophy in English studies at the University of Cambridge. With Cheyenne C. Cardell '15, Cheyenne W. Davis '15, Andrew T. Perricone ’17 and Morgan C. Harden ’17, she produces a collaborative narrative podcast called “The Unexplored Places,” whose setting is inspired by Kenyon.

2015

Lucia G.B. Priselac moved to Scotland last August to pursue a master’s in international and European politics at the University of Edinburgh. After its completion this summer, she is “still figuring out her post-grad plans,” she writes, “but between Brexit and the Trump administration, her degree is seeming more relevant than ever. Hopefully future employers agree!”

2015

Megan H. Shaw moved back from Ireland to Las Vegas, Nevada, after completing her master’s in Anglo-Irish literature and drama at University College Dublin and receiving several awards there. She has been working as a proposal writer for the public transportation firm Keolis Transit America and shares a home with boyfriend Michael “Andy” Bazany III '15.

2015

Ashley L. Yang-Thompson updates: “I am living nomadically, writing poetry (‘Sex Without Touching’) and collecting ghost stories for ‘The Spiritual History of the United States.’” She interprets dreams for Rub, Flux Factory’s Now Wave newsletter.

2016

Sarah K. Ash writes that she enjoys her theological studies at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, California. Her latest endeavor has been getting books donated to a prison where she teaches a philosophy class. “It’s looking successful, should the warden approve the radical book list full of rebels such as Plato and Descartes,” she writes.

2016

Spencer T. Byers has lived in Baltimore for two years with Ian P.G. Round '16 and Victoria G. “Tori” Hoover '16 while he works at the Lieber Institute for Brain Development. This fall he begins a doctorate in neuroscience at Boston University.

2016

Abigail L. Cooper lives in Boston with Samantha C. Leder ’17, the two of them “keeping the Archon spirit alive with plenty of pizza and ’90s hits,” Abi writes. After “accidentally killing a beautiful herb garden,” she adds, “they have become parents to several succulents and hope this will teach them more about ‘responsibility.’”

2016

Ryan W. Funk became a first officer for Piedmont Airlines, an American Eagle operator, flying out of Philadelphia. “I should be flying into Columbus,” he writes, “so I hope to transport some Kenyon students and alumni in the near future.”

2016

Samuel C. Lagasse, in his second year of doctoral study at Cornell University, received a Critical Language Scholarship from the U.S. State Department for the study of Bengali and will spend summer in Kolkata, India. Sam writes, “I returned to competition in track and field and won some local Ithaca races this past winter. I wish I’d been racing with my KCT&F teammates, but I swear that you all were there with me in spirit!”

2016

Laura C. Messenger, Austin, Texas, is a family advocate at an emergency homeless shelter for recently immigrated mothers and children. She spends her free time rock climbing, running and exploring Texas’ beautiful state parks.

2017

Benjamin T. Adekunle-Raji is now a management and program analyst for the FBI. “I guess I’ve been living a double life, though,” he writes, “because off hours I’ve been working on publishing my first poetry book while posting an obnoxious amount of poetry and spoken word content to my website (benjaminraji.com). I’m also building a collective of artists (kingdomknight.co).”

2017

Dominic W. Camperchioli enjoyed his first year of medical school at the University of Cincinnati and looks forward to spending the summer in Salt Lake City in a neurobiology lab researching how genetic mutations in synaptic development lead to variations in seizure frequency and presentation.

2017

Jiayu Chen is in her first year of her doctorate at Johns Hopkins University in cellular molecular medicine. “I am doing my lab rotation now,” she informs, “but I hope to study cancer and cancer immunology.”

2017

Samuel P. Clougher teaches and coaches at Trinity-Pawling School in New York, where he just became its director of diversity. “Currently working on obtaining a work visa for next year to avoid deportation!” Sam writes.

2017

Katherine L. Connolly works on a ranch in Bozeman, Montana, where she lives with Andrew T. Perricone '17, Seth T. Reichert '17 and Lauren E. Michael '17. She teaches piano at a local music store in town and plays flute in the Montana State University band.

2017

Pankti V. Dalal is a University of Pennsylvania Teaching Fellow at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, teaching algebra II honors, coaching two sports, advising in the dorm and working on her master’s in education from Penn.

2017

Emily S. Daluga, New York City, is a children’s editorial assistant with Abrams books. “I get to work on everything from a middle grade biography of Eleanor Roosevelt to a YA adventure about a girl who wants her exorcised demon back!”

2017

Dalton Eudy, Dallas, took a new position as a credit risk analyst at Regional Finance. He is halfway through an M.B.A. from South University. “Additionally,” he reports, “I keep up with my soccer fix by playing in the North Texas Soccer Association, where my club, Leon FC, won the Budweiser Cup and qualified for regionals in July.”

2017

Alexandra J. Hansen studied this year at the Johns Hopkins-Nanjing University Center in Nanjing, China, taking graduate-level courses on U.S.-China relations and foreign policy in Mandarin. Upon receiving her graduate certificate in Chinese and American studies this June, she looks forward to a career in international affairs.

2017

Sara E. Kelleher teaches English and history at Cardozo Education Campus in Washington, D.C. She’ll soon complete her Johns Hopkins master’s in education with a focus on special education, and describes the first year out of Kenyon as “incredibly challenging but also so rewarding!”

2017

Benjamin E. Koses, Springfield, Virginia, works for U.S. News & World Report, “helping promote accuracy in news consumers can use,” he informs.

2017

Mary S. Lauletta married her “best friend Hunter Begy” and moved to Oklahoma, where she is a marketing publicist and social media manager for the U.S. Air Force at Vance Air Force Base.

2017

Sarah M. Lloyd is in her first of two years at the University of Pennsylvania’s Independent School Teaching Residency, completing a master’s in education while teaching at Baltimore’s Gilman School, for boys K-12. Sarah teaches ninth-grade history, coaches water polo and swimming, and advises the Gender and Sexuality Alliance.

2017

Caitelin F.K. McCoy, Bronx, New York, worked during senior year on an independent film with Robert W. Bates ’81 called “A Mother’s Heart.” “You can watch it on Vimeo,” she suggests.

2017

Bridget C. Murdoch, New York City, loves working for a female-founded HR tech startup, Scouted.io. “I’m also still teaching fitness classes at New York Sports Club if you want to drop in!” she adds.

2017

Rosa C. Shipley joined the Brooklyn Public Library last September as a fellow. She develops podcast and journalistic programs throughout the borough’s 59 branches.

2017

Alexandra M. Stois works with Migration and Refugee Services, a nonprofit that resettles refugees in the Cleveland area and helps them acclimate to life in the U.S. “My job is to teach ESOL classes to refugee single mothers,” she explains, “as well as help them find work and get whatever government assistance they may need. It’s been great getting to know our clients and their stories, as well as being able to help them in a concrete way!”

2017

Gianna S. Biaggi and Oscar L. Anderson inform that they “are now legally domestic partners and are moving to Mississippi to run a livestock artificial insemination plant.”

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