1940s

1948

“The virus problem brings to mind my father’s experience in 1918–19 with the Great Influenza. His observations led to his invention of the first oxygen tent in 1921. The fabric was rubberized and supplied by the Goodyear Rubber Co. Aeronautical Division, of Dayton, Ohio. I am hunkered down and have at hand my copy of the poems of Robert Frost, which he graciously signed to me when he visited Kenyon. ‘Miles to go before I sleep.'”

Ira Eliasoph, White Plains, New York

1950s

1952

Allen B. Ballard Jr., Clifton Park, New York, still gets in at least a half-mile of walking every day using his rollator walker, he writes. “Spending a lot of time on new hobbies of sourdough bread baking and playing the chromatic harmonica. The latter is a great source of relaxation. I can easily spend an hour or so playing by ear from a repertoire of American, Russian and French folk songs stored away in my brain’s hard drive! Great fun. Learning to play the harmonica was not too difficult. Had to stop playing the guitar because of shoulder aches and pains. Best wishes to all, and keep on moving as well as you can!” Allen adds that his novel “Carried By Six,” which won an Honor Book Award from the Black Caucus of the ALA in 2010, is being reissued in June by First Steps Publishing, an Oregon small press.

1953

Richard L. Thomas updates that he and Helen are healthy, splitting time between Naples, Florida; Winnetka, Illinois; and Wisconsin. “Our three children are all in the Chicago area,” Dick writes. He enjoyed spending time with the Kenyon Board in Naples this spring and reports being pleased to hear that “things seem to be in good shape in Gambier.”

1954

David Y. Smith, Newbury Park, California, writes that being housebound — and finding television “a wasteland” and his local library closed — he has turned to his shelves to plunge into neglected classics. “My junior year I took Dr. Solomon’s course in Eastern European History. We were required to read a novel by a Russian author. Mine was Gogol’s ‘Dead Souls.’ That got me started.”

1954

Paul B. Wolfe, La Jolla, California, cast his vote in the California primary this spring: “So I guess I’m no longer a Vermont resident,” he informs. “Dave Smith helped me in the transition and also provided me with his primer on bridge. We live a couple of hours from Los Angeles, where two of our daughters live. Our third is back in Maine.”

1955

Quentin T. Kelly, Hopewell, New Jersey, informs that his company, WorldWater & Solar Technologies, Inc., now has eight solar energy projects that are providing electricity and water to factories in Morocco. “We also have solar-driven electricity and water supply projects for drinking and irrigation in Namibia, Cote d’Ivoire,
Kenya and Tanzania,” he writes. Quentin founded the company in 1984 in conjunction with Princeton University engineers and scientists, and he expects to sell it and retire next year. He adds: “People are continually surprised to learn that I earned my living as a writer in Hollywood and New York for many years after leaving Kenyon but have been running an engineering company for the last 35 years.”

1956

William E. Lowry Jr., Chicago, reports that life with the Lowry family remains upbeat. “I must admit, however,” Bill shares, “that the imposing task of living so close to one another because of the virus is challenging. So far we appear sane as well as safe.” For now, Bill’s children, grandchildren and a great-grandchild live nearby. He continues to serve as chair of the Illinois Labor Relations Board. “I truly believe this is my ‘swan song,’” he explains. “At least that’s what my wife, Teri, tells me.”

1958

Phil B. Hammond and his wife safely completed a 16-day cruise from Miami to San Diego through the Panama Canal in early March. “Our third trip through the canal,” Phil informs. “Each time it is fascinating to watch huge ships, mostly freighters, and all larger than our ship, rise over 20 feet in less than 15 minutes as a lock fills with water. The ship lived up to its name, Splendor. Everything was brand-new. The food and service were top-notch. Because of the coronavirus we expected difficulty in disembarking and flying home to Phoenix, but we encountered no problems or delays. Great trip — a state of calm not likely to return as we hunker down for who knows how long.”

1958

Richard L. Moore, Round Rock, Texas, finished a 39-year engineering career at IBM and then taught five years at LeTourneau University. He also served as an assistant pastor at his church for about 20 years, having completed a master’s at Dallas Theological Seminary. “I’m now fully retired,” he updates, “with all four of my offspring and their families living within a few miles.”

1959

Brig. Gen. Roger C. Smith, Moneta, Virginia, was “hunkering down and enjoying being at home,” he reports. “All our usual events have been canceled.” He and Sybil, who have been married 54 years, nevertheless recruited over 100 members to their new political action committee, Proud Patriots of Smith Mountain Lake. “We are looking forward to getting our two antique boats in the water and enjoying the solitude of the lake,” he adds. “Many potential tourists are staying at home. Yet we hope this will all be over soon so we can enjoy visits from our children and grandchildren.”

1960s

1960

Melvin J. Chavinson, Cleveland, and his wife, Kaye, visited their son’s family in the Bay Area two weeks before lockdown, he informs. “Our oldest son, Drew, is an emergency room physician there. So while we worry about our whole family, we are particularly worried about him. I still work one day a week at a community mental health center as a child and adolescent psychiatrist in Mentor, Ohio.” Mel was about to start performing those duties from home by phone and telemedicine. “Kaye and I hope all of you stay healthy and are able successfully to avoid this killer virus.”

1960

Wesley J. MacAdam, Arlington, Virginia, described how COVID-19 interrupted his life: “I still work technically part time, but actually full time, in the Arlington election office.” Wes also volunteers to read applications from prospective students from former Soviet countries pursuing educational exchanges. A trip with fellow volunteers to Kosovo and Albania this year has been postponed. “Life is an interesting journey,” he sums up.

1961

Robert D. Hoge, Ottawa, Canada, retired from Carleton University as an emeritus and distinguished research professor. “Age 80 is a good time to do that,” Bob writes. “Lynda and I continue to enjoy our travels, most recently to Buenos Aires, Argentina; Cape Horn; and Santiago, Chile.”

1961

Daniel O. Holland, now in Waynesboro, Virginia, has been appreciating life “in a place not defined by winter,” he updates. “Each day I get to look out on the Blue Ridge Mountains and enjoy the company of genteel people (even John Clark '61). I am busy with three literary endeavors: compiling a small volume of poetry requested by a friend, putting together a compendium of angling stories I’ve written over the years, and completing work on my seventh novel.”

1963

“Aloha, everyone! Karen, Kim and I are doing well here despite the lockdown. Kim was at the embassy in Beijing for three years before being transferred to Hawaii. She’s living in our first-floor apartment and joins us for dinner. Her boyfriend, Chris, is stuck in D.C., unable to return home to Beijing. You probably wouldn’t recognize Waikiki ... the only folks out and about are local surfers, homeless, a few residents and straggler visitors, and the police! In short, the famous beach looks much like it must have looked before the number of tourists greatly escalated following statehood in 1959.”

C. Richard Fassler, Honolulu, Hawaii

1964

Jeffrey D. Gold, Hamden, Connecticut, closed his ophthalmology practice in 2019. “The time has come to move on to the next chapter,” Jeff writes. “To avoid stagnation I am working part time doing in-home wellness checks for insurance companies. Vicki and I are comfortably sheltering at home for now.”

1964

David S. Gullion retired from his medical oncology and hematology practice at Marin Cancer Care, north of San Francisco, in 2017, and stepped down as medical director of Marin General Hospital’s Center for Integrative Heath and Wellness. “Linda and I are enjoying our new home in Boise, Idaho,” he updates, “having fun with friends, hiking, riding bicycles along the Greenbelt pathway along the Boise River, skiing at Bogus Basin 45 minutes away, rafting or kayaking the Boise River, and boating on the Lucky Peak Reservoir.”

1964

Edward T. Ordman, Memphis, Tennessee, and his partner, Heidi, were traveling in Cambodia and Vietnam when COVID-19 hit. “We had to change planes in Hong Kong on Feb. 8 and then, upon return, self-isolate in Memphis for 14 days,” he writes. “No ill effects.”

1966

Richard A. Cantine, Rancho Palos Verdes, California, remains active playing tennis and golf. “Granddaughter Sophie and grandson Aidan are home in Seattle after cancellation of the track and field seasons at Princeton and Swarthmore,” he informs. Dick also had an enjoyable meeting at his home with Kent M. Woodward-Ginther ’92 from development, who “gave me a very nice update on campus affairs and those to come,” he updates.

1966

James S. Cowlin updates: "For the last dozen years since I closed my commercial photography studio I have been concentrating on landscape and travel photography. In particular, I’ve been photographing along U.S. Route 89, a border-to-border highway through the west. Spending time on the road visiting seven national parks has been a photographer’s dream.” Currently unable to hit the road, Jim is editing photo files and updating the U.S. Route 89 website. “One big consolation,” he adds, “is the woods behind my house — a new world among the oaks, shrubs and grasses, an ever-changing fifteen acres." See for yourself at jamescowlin.com.

1966

“I’ve been having a remarkable experience being in Gambier as the country is locking down under the constraints of the coronavirus pandemic. The quiet village is as quiet as I’ve ever seen it. Lenten services at the Church of the Holy Spirit were canceled on the orders of the governor of Ohio. Chaplain Rachel C. Kessler ’04 has organized daily services online. It is a sobering but strangely reassuring experience to be part of all this.”

Peter A. White

1967

Edward J. Forrest Jr., Marietta, Georgia, received a patent in March for his novel technology to inspect fiber optic connection surfaces. It’s Ed’s 12th patent, but this is the first issued in his name. “It feels good to ‘own’ one!” he writes. “No doubt about liberal arts erudition: The foundation — both educationally and socially — carried me a long way.”

1968

Ronald K. Bliss, Colorado Springs, Colorado, together with an Air Force Office of Special Investigations colleague, gave a presentation titled “The Iranian Revolution: A View from the Nest of Spies” to a political science class at Colorado College in February. Ron informs: “Largely a recounting of our personal experiences as OSI counterintelligence agents in Tehran 41 years ago, it appeared to have been well-received. So far as we could tell, only one student fell asleep.”

1968

Michael C. Johnston, Stratham, New Hampshire, shared the educational project he and his wife, Jean Bernard, and daughter Alysoun N. (Johnston) Regier ’02 have undertaken. Spectacle Learning Media has published “Learning to Get Along: How to Integrate Social and Emotional Learning into Your Teaching Practice,” six self-paced modules for teachers to adapt to local circumstances. “We are providing this directly to teachers without charges,” Mike notes, “as a way to get practical tools into their hands.” As consultants who have trained teachers in Trinidad and Tobago, Burkina Faso, Uganda, Yemen, Lebanon, Somalia and South Sudan for a decade, Mike writes, they have had enthusiastic responses to their videos, slide presentations and printable scripts. “We are hoping alumni interested in education and teacher training might consider sharing them within the networks they have.” Learn more at spectaclelearningmedia.net.

1969

“I continue to help folks with criminal justice questions and problems. Volunteer a lot, too, at the local homeless shelter. Not making money, but doing what I want to do!”

Kenneth R. Abraham, Dover, Delaware

1969

William M. Lokey, Tacoma, Washington, was busy delivering lectures on cruise ships until this spring. “The COVID-19 outbreak involved some adventure,” he updates, “trying to get home after the latest rerouting where I ended up — Perth, Australia.” For now, Bill is social distancing, but in February he and his wife, Andre, went to Sun Valley. “Had the chance to visit Elaine and Pierce E. Scranton Jr. ’68 for some great skiing and social time, remembering Kenyon and our time together on the track team.”

1970s

1970

“My years at Kenyon were very meaningful. I majored in poli sci, hoping to become a diplomat or an international expert someday. I spent my junior year in France, which is my home today. I ended up working mostly as a freelance consultant in educational planning and evaluation, with numerous missions in Africa. I am in close touch with David P. Adams '70, who also studied in France with me during our junior year.”

Eric P. Allemano

1970

J.D. Pell Osborn, Charlestown, Massachusetts, was “easing into retirement,” he updates, “when the coronavirus pandemic shuttered the schools and colleges where
I’ve been teaching my LineStorm Animation seminars for the past 20 years. Abruptly, retirement was upon me.” Pell describes his “super-simple, stay-healthy mode” of avoiding mammalian contact except for wife Louise and their Abyssinian cat, Enterprise. “We water the plants, take daily bike rides through an eerily deserted Boston and catch up on long-deferred projects, among them sorting through a family photo closet. I’m also working on the independent animation series Jazz Classics Illustrated, originally conceived by musicologist Murray L. Horwitz '70. It’s best right now to plant your feet, breathe deeply, have a look around, wash your hands a lot and drink plenty of water. That makes a good day.”

1970

Murray L. Horwitz, Chevy Chase, Maryland, does a daily mini-podcast for Question of the Day, a popular smart speaker trivia game. Murray explains: “Say ‘Alexa, what’s the Question of the Day?’ After you hear the answer, you’ll hear Murray. And, unlike at Kenyon, you can turn him off.”

1970

Rodney L. Wiggins, Aurora, Ohio, successfully completed 12 weeks of cardiac rehab in March following a triple bypass surgery. Rod updates: “I continue to appreciate the quality of medicine in America and look forward to seeing classmates.”

1971

“I’m mostly retired now, but still designing graveyards after my big success with the Kokosing Nature Preserve. As you can guess, it’s a very peaceful place.”

Stephen F. Christy Jr., Chicago

1971

Gordon D. Weith, York, Pennsylvania, is vice president of Pennsylvania Wounded Warriors (a $1.8 million nonprofit) and vice president of York County Veterans’ Outreach and a mentor with the county Veterans Wellness Court. “Keeps me fairly busy, but in front of computer too much,” he reports. “Also fortunate to still be
with Diana M. Morgan Weith ’73. We started dating 50 years ago this summer.”

1971

Mark S. Frank lives in Pittsburgh but has founded a youth arts program in Acre (Akko), Israel, for underserved Israeli Arabs and Jews. Called Northern Israel Center for Arts and Technology, it serves marginalized Arab and Jewish youth “in a nurturing, art-filled, sunlit space,” he reports. “Middle and high school students use 3-D printing, digital photography, and filmmaking and production technology (while) breaking down barriers between one another.” Because so many Israeli Arabs and Jews tend to study in separate schools, Mark reports, the center sees results stemming from both groups learning to break their stereotypes about each other.

1971

“Life as a retiree is a new adventure. As much to do as when I was working — only I’m not getting paid.” Glenn volunteers at a community college, training dental auxiliaries, who have impressed him with their desire “to learn and better themselves,” he writes. “I had the pleasure of watching the Lords pull out a great win against Catholic University last fall.”

Glenn W. Fritz, Chesapeake, Virginia

1971

J. Scott Lord, Dover, New Hampshire, described a “most welcome and informative discussion” he had with Katherine M. (Katie) Hileman ’22 as part of the coronavirus modified phonathon. “We made each other laugh with stories of Kenyon then and now,” he informs. “I particularly enjoyed her tale of the haunting of the old pool — now the dance studio — by a diver who sprang too high off the diving board, struck his head on the ceiling of the natatorium roof, knocked himself out and fell unconscious into the water, where he drowned.” That story, Scott joked, made him want to check on fraternity brother Peter H. Holmes III '71, “diver extraordinaire” for the Lords. He also recently talked with Jeffrey A. Oppenheim '71 and reconnected with Delta Phi brother Thomas C. Swiss ’70.

1972

Samuel Barone, Mount Vernon, Ohio, retired in June after 18 years as executive director of the Knox County Foundation. Alongside dedicated community volunteers— including President Sean Decatur, a board member — Sam helped award nearly $4 million per year in grants and scholarships to local nonprofits and college-bound students. He continues to volunteer on the Knox Community Hospital and Foundation Park Conservancy boards. With Kenyon staff, he and Paula M. Siegel Barone '72 are exploring the possibility of establishing a Knox County Area Alumni Association. Both Sam and Paula are thrilled to report that daughter Luisa Barone Gantt, now associate director of advancement communications at Kenyon, has relocated from Cleveland to Mount Vernon with her family.

1973

Amy (Goodwin) Aldrich, Washington, D.C., describes her Chevy Chase home as “something of a WeWork thing, with our two adult sons joining us for telework, coffee breaks, neighborhood walks and family dinners. A true silver lining during unsettled times.” Amy sends her deep gratitude for the cheering messages last fall when she was ill. “I hope you are safe and healthy, and that we will soon gather in person, either in Gambier or elsewhere for mini-reunions.”

1973

Christopher A. Bloom and his wife, JoAnne, are at home in Chicago, surrounded by pictures of their new grandson, Cyril. “Class of 2042?” Chris wonders. “We’re FaceTime video conferencing with his mom, Mary O. Bloom ’09, and aunt Anna V. Bloom ’04. I do my part each night by making a fashionable cocktail, which I share virtually with family and friends. Cheers!”

1973

Jean C. Dunbar continues working on historic interiors. Current projects include a privately owned Arts and Crafts residence in Connecticut, and Cedar Grove, the home of 19th-century artist Thomas Cole. “Last year,” Jean writes, “Peter and I purchased the cottage in southwest England where we’ve spent half the year for so many years. Our walled garden, with its apple trees, looks out on Dunster’s medieval church and Dunster Castle. Plenty of space to grow vegetables and flowers. Classmates interested in walking and exploring the Exmoor National Park’s amazing scenery are welcome, even if we’re back in Lexington, Virginia, where we live the rest of the year.”

1973

Shirley J. Leow, Lakewood, Colorado, breathes a sigh of relief after “shelter in place” orders made it a scramble to move into her new home in a 55+ community. Now to “social distance and get ready to meet my new neighbors,” she reports. “In the midst of unpacking I will again be a judge in the GLOBE International Virtual Science Symposium. I particularly enjoy seeing what the students have explored as an idea to improve their community’s health. Some of the STEM teachers really inspire their young students.”

1974

Wilder Gutterson III, London, U.K., empathizes with all who are struggling in this hard time: "Watching how dysregulating this has been for people, families and society — and imagining how it will change us. Britain is not the U.S., and our precious NHS has come into the limelight. I’m mostly housebound, and fortuitously quite busy conducting Zoom therapy sessions with couples and family unexpectedly stuck at home — yes, I’m now a qualified couples and family therapist! And like us all, watching and waiting and washing my blessed hands at every turn."

1974

Peter Smagorinsky, Athens, Georgia, is the 2020 recipient of the Horace Mann League Outstanding Public Educator Award, presented to outstanding educators who have, over their career, supported public education. He has two books forthcoming from Bloomsbury: “Learning to Teach English and Language Arts: A Vygotskian Perspective on Beginning Teachers’ Pedagogical Concept Development” and “Developing Culturally and Historically Sensitive Teacher Education: Global Lessons from a Literacy Education Program.”

1975

Steven C. Durning, Holliston, Massachusetts, retired from his career as a high school English teacher. “It turned out that being an English major was vocational training for me,” Steve submits. “I spend my time now writing recreationally: personal essay writing groups and, on my own, verse in the style of the New York School, I guess. I tutor a severely disabled high school junior. I spend time in the woods with our dog. My partner, younger than I, continues to work. I live a contemplative life.”

1975

Judith Rubenstein reports: "You knew me as Judy, but since graduating I’ve been 100 percent Judith. After a marriage of 23 years (which ended in 2005) and bringing up my family in the nice town of Dover, New Hampshire, I now live in the almost-too-picturesque harbor town of Portsmouth, New Hampshire — bitingly windy in winter, crowded with tourists in summer. I’m fortunate to live directly on the water.” A writer and editor, Judith works full time for an education nonprofit and serves on the boards of a professional theater and an arts education organization. She’s also a volunteer crew member on the Gundalow, “a replica of the type of 17th-century sailing barge that plied the tidal rivers that converge in Portsmouth.” Daughter Ruthie (34) made her a grandmother in January 2019, and younger daughter Hannah (30) planned to marry Labor Day weekend 2020. “I’m on my own, busy and satisfied,” Judith sums up. “Not a social media fan, but welcome direct contact: judithlrub@gmail.com."

1975

Alice Cornwell Straus traveled for three weeks in Antarctica, returning to find “my retirement fund melting faster than the glaciers,” she informs. “I did not contract the coronavirus in my travels, for which I am grateful. However, the plumbing in my 75-year-old house has attracted every tree root in Gambier during my absence, so I am fully engaged in U.S. life once again. If the house is still standing, drop by.”

1976

“On November 10, we were delighted to host many Kenyonites at the wedding of our daughter Delia M. Turner ’08. In addition to younger guests from the twenty-aughts and teens, old friends Alexander W. (Alec) Stevens '76 and Jean Warschauer Stevens '76, Frank A. Labor III '76, Timothy P. O’Neill '76, plus sister-in-law Anne Allen Chamberlin ’83 were in attendance. Jean E. Turner ’10 served as maid of honor.”

Anne B. Chamberlin, with Joel E. Turner '76, Havertown, Pennsylvania

1976

Kim M. Straus, Santa Fe, New Mexico, was appointed by the governor to the board of the New Mexico Children’s Trust Fund. He also serves on the Santa Fe County Health Planning and Policy Commission and a couple of other state task forces. These and volunteer activities keep him busy in retirement, he updates.

1976

Kathryn L. Weise, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, retired in August after working since medical school in pediatric intensive care, pediatric palliative care, pediatric rehab medicine and bioethics. She will continue working as an ethicist on several data safety monitoring boards “while plotting a move from Cleveland back to my home state of Maryland,” Kathy updates. “My dream is to end upon or near our family property at Deep Creek Lake in the mountainous western panhandle of Maryland, growing blueberries and fruit trees, learning to graft heirloom apple varieties, and making progress against non-native plants that have invaded our conservation easement. It’s been fun working with local community college students to eradicate barberries — we call our- selves ‘the barberrians.’”

1977

Amy Kirshbaum Harbison and John H. Harbison ’79 welcomed the birth of their first grandchild, Lukas, on Leap Year Day. Amy, a certified coach helping execs through professional transitions, is a senior fellow for Montgomery County, Maryland. She also hosts “Seniors Today,” a public access television show for the county.

1977

Rabbi Steven J. Lebow, Marietta, Georgia, continues to publish his fiction and poetry in print and online. Steve has written and published a dozen science fiction and horror stories this past year and was a nominee for the Pushcart Prize in Poetry. He adds that he “renews his Kenyon friendships every February by vacationing with Mark E. Rerek '77 and Peter King '77.”

1978

Timothy C. Gorin moved to Los Angeles in 2018 and now lives in Sherman Oaks, California. He works as a producer on the ABC prime-time news magazine “20/20.” Tim sees fellow Angeleno Mindy Roffman Eads '78 and is in frequent contact with best friend and former roommate Robert A. Samit '78. “Rob and I recently met in Manhattan for dinner with our other partner-in-crime, Edward S. (Ned) Brokaw '78,” he adds.

1978

“Really wishing our kids in Seattle and New Orleans were closer to home. So thankful to Kenyon professors who patiently helped me move from a thoroughly inept writer to one that’s at least able to string together a reasonably comprehensible editorial. After 40 years of managing engineering and construction projects in the steel and chemical industries, I’m now semi-retired, puttering around the yard and writing editorials for our local newspaper and my blog, ‘Compelled to Move Forward.'”

George R. Zadigian, Alliance, Ohio

1979

Kathleen V. Kirk, Normal, Illinois, is “delighted and honored” to share that she won the Patricia Dobler Poetry Award. According to the award website, “Kirk’s poem, ‘Fox Collar,’ with its singular, distinct voice and its willingness to risk, distinguished itself from a field of 335 entries.” Sadly, Kathleen writes, the April award event at Carlow University in Pittsburgh was canceled — “along with classes and everything else!” she informs. “Feeling for Kenyon and for us all. Sending love and hope!”

1979

Chip Lamb, Brooklyn, Connecticut, was awarded the Scripps Endowed Chair for the Arts at Pomfret School in Connecticut, where he has led the arts department and directed the theater program for the past 14 years.

1979

Jeffrey Place received his third Grammy in January. Jeff won for producing the best historical release, a six-CD, 200-page set on Pete Seeger. “Still living in Mayo, Maryland, by the Chesapeake Bay,” he adds.

1979

Rowene K. Weems, Powell, Wyoming, cheers, “Retirement rocks!” After a 20-year museum career, Rowe is concentrating on photography and making jewelry (roweneweemsphotography.com). She writes: “I have the joy of living near the ocean and the mountains, Connecticut and Wyoming, to be near my kids and fiancé. I frequently see Richard J. Siegel '79 and Jennifer Bakewell Siegel ’80, Alexander W. (Alec) Stevens ’76 and Jean Warschauer Stevens ’76, Oliver Knowlton ’80 and Lisa Castellani Knowlton ’79, and art professor Marty Garhart (who lives in my Wyoming town). This keeps Kenyon memories alive in many conversations!”

1980s

1980

“After a 25-year career in finance in the cable industry, I started a second career in supply chain, only to leave that and rejoin my old company. Still working and glad to be doing so. My son Ellis (33) lives near us in Orlando — great to have him near (and he fixes my Wi-Fi/ tech issues). My wife of 35 years, Jennifer, is a ceramic artist. We live with and take much direction from Millie and Clarence (Boston terrier and cockapoo, respectively). Hope all my classmates are well.”

Nelson Roe, Altamonte Springs, Florida

1981

Samuel W. Adams, Norwalk, Connecticut, describes a March get-together hosted by Walker M. Bagby Jr. ’81 where, Sam jokes, “Things went downhill pretty fast. Six ’81 DKEs gathered at Walker’s place at Big Sky, Montana, for skiing, beer and fireworks.” With Sam and Walker were Wm. McPherson (Mac) Durrett ’81, Franklin P. Spaeth ’81, Tod H. Colbert ’81 and Wells Smith ’81. “Pure coincidence that both Big Sky and Yellowstone Park had to be closed the day after we left,” Sam writes.

1981

Robin L. Bennett, Bellevue, Washington, received the Mercer Island School District’s Pathfinder Award, presented to graduates whose “achievements, strength of character and citizenship inspire and challenge today’s youth to make significant contributions to humankind,” she informs. Bennett is an international leader in the field of genetic counseling, having served as president of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and on the boards of international societies in human genetics and genetic counseling. She is the first genetic counselor to receive a faculty title in the University of Washington School of Medicine, where she is a clinical professor.

1981

“Here in Denver, I’m breaking isolation only to take walks, get food and pay occasional visits to the solitary studio of our local community radio station. If you’re seeking some listening during this unprecedented moment, tune in at AfterFM. com/douggertner.”

Douglas Gertner

1981

Catherine Hazlett, Fairfield, Connecticut, laments news reports of “people hoarding supplies unnecessarily and not thinking of their neighbors who may be in real need. Where are our better angels?” Cathy asks. “A small gesture like thanking the people who stock those shelves goes a long way. I am terrified that my husband, who has stage-four prostate cancer, will be carelessly infected, so I sanitize, sanitize, sanitize, but feel so blessed that he has such a wonderful sense of humor and stays so positive.” She and Peter are planning a move to Asheville, North Carolina.

1981

Karen M. Jaffe, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, spent a month in Brooklyn and “had a lovely impromptu breakfast with Lisa C. Wood ’81,” she shares. “Also met Andrew P. Newcombe ’81 for dinner after not having seen each other for over 30 years! Feeling quite well in spite of having Parkinson’s for over a decade. Helping to run InMotion (a wellness center for PD), serving on the Michael J. Fox Foundation Patient Council and getting myself to Stanford every three months for a research study are keeping me busy.”

1981

“My new play ‘The Laugh Track’ opened Sept. 11 at ACT in Seattle. It was inspired by reading that Lucille Ball’s head writer was a woman. It’s a play about funny women and the early days of television.”

Wendy A. MacLeod, Gambier, Ohio

1982

The Rev. Brian K. Wilbert and spouse Yorki Encalada purchased a historic home in Oberlin, Ohio, last November and have been unpacking, settling in and enjoying it. “Yorki continues to teach at Oberlin using Zoom technology,” Brian updates, while he keeps tabs on parishioners of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Cleveland Heights via phone calls, letters, social media and Zoom conferencing. With Zoom and Skype they keep in touch with Kenyon friends, including Julie and Robert E. Blythe ’82. “We are joining everyone in praying/hoping for the safety of all who are sick, as well as for their families, friends and the doctors, nurses and aides who tend to their care,” he writes.

1983

Diane E. (Weinland) Schwener shares that because she already works from home and has an abundance of projects to tackle, 2019 was more earth-shaking for her personally: "The very day in early March that we began a kitchen remodel, my 90-year-old father fell at home and slid from there to his passing in late April. Cleaning out and selling the family home my grandparents built in 1941 on Lake Cable (near Canton) required monthly commuting from Colorado. My son and his fiancé married in August in Boulder, and our daughter and son-in-law gave us our first grandchild in Aspen a mere 10 days before. Finally, my oldest brother discovered his stage-four lung cancer last summer and passed away at 61 in November. Flooded with both grief and joy, and overwhelmed by the to-do list, I found great relief in just focusing on my breathing, staying grateful and keeping family and friends close. And of course, a well-made Manhattan or two. Seems like a good recipe for these uncertain times, as well."

1984

Donata A. Rechnitzer, Frankfort, Ohio, medical director of two urgent care centers in Columbus, has had “a very tumultuous spring!” she writes. “We seem to be revising policies daily in our efforts to ‘flatten the curve.’ Recalling the springtime splendor of that first truly warm, dry and sunny day along Middle Path, it saddens me to think of the current students who will not have those memories, especially the seniors. Times such as these put into perspective the importance of staying connected, even if only virtually! Wash your hands, cover your cough and we’ll meet again on the other side of the COVID-19 curve.”

1984

Jeffrey J. Webster, Austin, Texas, works at a nonprofit called Trellis, researching college affordability and student debt. “We just concluded a major study on college students with low food security and are administering a national survey on student financial wellness,” Jeff updates. “It’s good work that constantly reminds me of my own college experience and how important such an opportunity can be."

1985

Jan M. Richardson is the candidate liaison and administrative coordinator for the Mississippi Public Education PAC, which was formed by four Mississippi women to support the election efforts of state legislative candidates who defend public education. Last November, 27 of the group’s endorsed candidates won their races.

1985

Deirdre van Dyk underwent a bone marrow transplant for AML leukemia in 2017. “I’m finally back among the living,” she updates. “I just started a job with Gannett (USA Today) editing their magazines. I get to work with NASA — I was obsessed with the Apollo program, so I’m excited. I also volunteer with environmental and social justice organizations in Washington, D.C., where I live.” Deirdre sees Kate Fonyo Pisano '85 in Baltimore to have dinner and talk about life, and saw Susan B. Berger '85 and her husband last year when visiting colleges with her nephew. “We tried to convince him to choose Kenyon. He chose Oberlin. Not even the (false) promise of a car upon graduation convinced him.”

1988

Paul Singer and his colleagues at WGBH News in Boston launched a series on racial disparities in government contracting. It’s titled “The Color Of Public Money.” Within weeks, he informs, the Massachusetts governor was announcing new policies to do better. “We are continuing to dig into this subject, so — more to come!”

1989

Andrew S. Albrecht, Shaker Heights, Ohio, already worked from home, but says things feel very different now: “The pandemic remains this distraction; I’m never completely focused. Ethan is home prematurely from his junior year at Hobart and William Smith, happily reverting to hermit mode, playing online games with friends. Leighton is maintaining a positive attitude in Seattle. Jean and I are bingeing on ‘The West Wing.’ With all the concern, frustration, anger and anxiety we face daily in the news and social media, there are also stories of inspiration, generosity and caring. Taking time to recognize moments of human compassion helps keep me uplifted. Grateful to my family, friends and community — and that includes my wonderful Kenyon classmates.”

1989

Scott H. Ehrlich, Tarzana, California, tried to persuade his older son to go to Kenyon, but he chose Grinnell. “But the recruiting process gave me an excuse to visit Gambier twice last year,” Scott adds. “And the memories conflicting with the changes made for a pair of great visits.”

1989

Sarah Wilsman, Solon, Ohio, works for OverDrive, “the company with the Libby app, which provides you free eBooks and audiobooks from your public library,” she explains. “Working from home, I am busy adding content to California schools through the companion Sora app for students. I recently got a promotion and am loving working with schools — even if it’s a bit nuts right now!”

1989

Margaret A. (Escherich) Alexander updates that after five particularly rough years, she sees her life getting back on track. She taught a systems librarian class for the University of Washington master’s of library science program and is now full-time faculty at the University of Oregon in Eugene, where she has lived for 18 years, serving as core systems librarian for all the UO libraries. “I don’t think my brain has been so awake and stimulated in years,” she notes. “I’ve been with my partner now for four years, and we have a lovely home with a dog, a cat, five chickens and three children between us — all in their early teens. I spend my spare time singing with the Eugene Opera chorus and playing with the Society of Creative Anachronism.”

1990s

1990

Martin P. Dockery, Brooklyn, New York, reports from his “new, surreal world of mandated isolation” that he had his first Zoom hangout with fellow Kenyonites to celebrate the milestone birthday of Mary E. (Beth) Kracklauer ’92. Virtually attending were Susan L. Hawk ’90, Ary Ziv ’91, Cornelia (Nellie) Kurtzman ’91, Timothy M. Crowley ’91, Katie Keating ’92 and Jordan O. Reed ’93. “Not exactly what Philander Chase envisioned,” Martin notes. “But then again, who did? Confined to my Brooklyn apartment, I’m spending all my time with my 22-month-old daughter, for whom social distancing means anything but.”

1990

J. Wade Sheppard III, Bethesda, Maryland, has been knee-deep in 18 months of trade negotiations with China on behalf of the U.S. Agriculture Department, his home for most of the last 22 years. Wade reports that he came up for air in January when the current deal was signed.

1991

Susan Gross Pollara, Hopewell, New Jersey, tells the story of The Morning Question: “In the summer of 2014, five of us from Mather first floor got together for an amazing weekend in Chicago. Mary C. Coleman ’91, Julie M. Emig ’91, Amy E. Jacobson ’91, Keira E. Martin Murphy ’91 and I reconnected, the first time all five of us had been together since junior year. That Oct. 24, Keira texted our group: For her birthday, she would text us a question of the day for the entire month. Head of the Middle School at St. Edwards in Vero Beach, Florida, Keira has a passion for genealogical research and a side hustle called Jumpstart Genealogy. Every morning we woke to a question, mostly about family history and heritage. Fantastic to be in touch every day. After a month, we decided to keep it going, so we are still at it (taking turns sending questions). As I write this, we are on Question 1,990. Through these 1,990 days — longer than we were at Kenyon together — we’ve supported each other through the birth of a baby, new jobs, a divorce, a victorious run for office, teenage kid issues, turning 50 and health issues. What Keira started as a gift to herself has been a gift to us all.”

1991

After David A. Kahn and his wife returned from a trip to Iceland, he decided he needed more motivation to work out. “I figured that committing to run at least a mile every day for a year was the least bad option,” he explains. “I did make it 366 days — stupid leap year! — and 1,200+ miles, but it was close on a couple days.” Working from home, David is thankful for his kids — their son, a college freshman, returned early from Seattle University but is happy about the sunnier weather in Denver. Their daughter, a high school junior, is figuring out how to check out prospective colleges.

1992

Alexandra (Price) Baj, Arlington, Virginia, was promoted to partner at Steptoe & Johnson LLP. Alex’s legal practice focuses on export controls, sanctions, anti-corruption and international trade. In March she was working from home and enjoying family time with husband Doug, four children (Amelia, Tessa, Jonathan and Cole) and dog Rufus.

1992

“In February I was promoted to be the assistant scout executive of the Transatlantic Council of the Boy Scouts of America. We serve boys and girls through all of our Scouting programs while their parents are posted at U.S. embassies, military installations, consulates, international schools and American businesses overseas in 53 countries and 14 time zones— from Iceland to Siberia, Norway to South Africa.” He extends an online invite: “If you are on a video platform, let’s log in and hoist a drink together!”

John R. Erskine Jr., Belgium

1992

Lainie Thomas reports that in January, when a volcano in the Philippines started spewing gases and the government warned of imminent eruption, she put their oldest child on a flight out — back to college, two hours before the airport closed. The volcano calmed down, but then the first COVID-19 death outside China was recorded in the Philippines. “Like people across the world,” Lainie writes, “we are trying to stay on top of the facts. Our four children’s three schools on two continents are closing. We are adapting to virtual learning and working from home.” She continues to work on civil society engagement projects in Uzbekistan, Georgia, India, the Philippines and the Pacific — “but not in person!”

1993

Meredith Martini Hoban, Roswell, Georgia, has lived over 18 years on the same street where she met her husband, Bill. Now it’s time to make a move — a whole mile away! “Clearly still in love with our cute historic town just outside Atlanta,” she notes. “The girls will be starting high school and middle school this fall. Hope to see my Kenyon friends more this next year as we celebrate the big 50!”

1994

Julian L. Boxenbaum, Montclair, New Jersey, a long-time reader, sends in his second note ever: “After about seven months in the new house, we are settling in nicely. The twins, Stella and Matilda, turned 3 in July and Alessandra and I are slowly starting to come out of ‘baby jail’ and reclaim our lives.” Julian had lunch with Kate E. Field ’94 and regularly talks with Temple B. Stites Jr. ’94, Jeremy D. Willius ’94, Nicholas J. Tyner ’94 and Rosanna Jones Anderson ’94. He works at 8 Inc. in the X8 Ventures branch, developing new products and services into independent businesses. “Still kicking myself for missing our reunion and packing my bags for the next one,” he adds.

1994

Martina E. Faulkner, Wilmette, Illinois, launched Inspirebytes Omni Media (Inspirebytes.com), a “publishing and multimedia company that changes the way things have always been done by focusing on fairness and integrity, while properly supporting the talent behind the work,” she writes. “We launched with over 21 titles and a roster of 13 talented authors and artists. Keep an eye out for the first book of poetry by Taylor M. Wray Jr. ’96 this fall! It’s stunningly beautiful.” Martina also has two new books, one in August and one coming in December.

1994

“It was six years in May that Steve and I moved from Memphis to Eureka Springs, Arkansas. I continue to work online for Austin Peay State University’s R.N. to B.S.N. nursing program. My only co-workers are my two cats. When not behind a computer, I participate in large-scale community crochet installations.”

Karen Rockett McFadden, Ozarks

1995

James C.D. Dewar, Fort McCoy, Florida, was married in a tiny ceremony in Oregon last fall. “Many felt we jumped the gun (we were engaged for seven years),” he reports. “Friends and family felt left out, which for the most part they were. In a spontaneous way, a wedding literally showed up around us. Within 24 hours of discussing, we were legally married. However, in light of recent events, timing may have been perfect. I have moved on from teaching yoga to life coaching and offering intuitive readings. While I think yoga is great, many use it to create codependency on a person or an ideology. My new work supports individual empowerment and independence, and has already helped many individuals make powerful life changes.”

1995

Katharine B. (Rucker) Sears, Jacksonville, Florida, shares that she took over as executive officer (second in command) of Navy Patrol Squadron Six-Two last July and expects to become commanding officer in late October. “Due to the nature of my job,” she reports, “I physically go to work each day and am working more hours. I do feel very blessed to have a job when so many do not.”

1996

Kenny Logan, Baltimore, works for a Johns Hopkins teaching residency program called Urban Teachers. “I teach secondary literacy courses,” he informs, “focusing mostly on adolescent reading instruction, and coach teachers in the city schools. My second YA novel is in the works.” Among his recent sightings of “kind, smart, hilarious” classmates, he names Cerelle C. Centeno ’96, Christopher H. Eliot ’96, Delia A. Kloh ’96, Douglas J. Partridge ’96, Langley Douglass Partridge ‘97, Christopher B. (C.B.) Pinkerton ’96 and Saundra Bakelar Revisky ’96.

1996

Abby S. Peck updates: "I am on remote work from Maine College of Art, where I’m the director of institutional giving and special events.” She calls moving from New York City to Maine five years ago “the best decision I ever made.” Recently she enjoyed “a fantastic and very silly Google hangout call” with Jennifer L. Marek '96, Silvia L. Mercado Masters '96, Anne T. Cullen '96, Shannon P. Galvin Szymikowski '96, Elizabeth A. (Beth) Thomarios '96, Julia M. Glynn Warga '96 and Elizabeth S. (Liz) Baroody-Solomon '96. Abby added: “I’m doing my best to stay healthy, but closed borders mean I can’t get to my partner, Hazel, in England, which is hard and pretty scary. Hoping for a quick end to this all."

1996

“After nearly 25 years, I guess I’m probably overdue in submitting my first class note. I live in Portland, Oregon, and work for the Oregon Department of Justice. My wife and I have a 9-year-old son (Archie) and a 3-year-old daughter (Tess) who do a pretty good job keeping Dad busy and tired.”

J. Trask Russill

1997

Alisoun (Davis) Bertsch, Athens, Pennsylvania, described her quarantine: “We watched Italy singing and decided that, being a Chamber Singer living in a small town, we would go that route. So we ran out to Walmart at midnight and got the last microphone to hook up to our speaker. We text the neighborhood what time we are coming, put the speaker out the car sun roof, and play music and talk to people over the microphone. We are on the street; they are on the sidewalk or porches. We pray together, sing, see if anyone needs anything. In the early days, we passed out books. I wear crazy wigs. Shout out to the Kenyon language, music, drama and religious studies departments for inspiring these things — and to Robert C. (Butch) King '97, who has shown us that bringing the beat brings a lot!” Each morning Alisoun’s kids (16, 13 and 10) send off their dad, a physician at a regional hospital, with a poignant “love you, be safe,” and upon his return they wait for him to wash up and change clothes before they hug him — tightly.

1997

Andrew P. Carey, Newtown, Connecticut, misses live music with friends; he consoles himself with Zoom group chats and solo bouzouki and voice sets over Facebook Live. In February he presented “Caitlín Maude: Saorvéarsaíocht agus Sean-Nós” (“Caitlín Maude: Free Verse and Old-Style Singing”) at a Lehman College symposium celebrating the works of Máirtín Ó Cadhain. “As with my academic work, most of my lyrical and poetic output over the past few years has been written in Irish,” he notes. A couple of his original songs still get occasional airplay on local radio.

1997

“My play ‘Headwind,’ which centers around privilege and bias as it applies to college admissions in the independent, private high school world, was selected for the 2019 IAMA New Works Festival at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. Fingers crossed for more life in 2020 and beyond.”

Adam Hunter Howard, Studio City, California

1997

Dwight K. Schultheis, Brookline, Massachusetts, never thought he’d be an ice hockey parent, waking early on weekends for practices and games, but he had a fun winter watching his son play. He reports “several sightings of Kenyon alums and celebrities: Benjamin Jump '97 and family visited Boston recently; also great to have a quick run-in with Adam K. Myers '97 on a recent business trip. On the celebrity front, I inadvertently bumped shoulders with Gisele Bündchen while I was walking and texting (but it was still magical). As scary as this time is, it’s been nice being cooped up with my family — and learning more than I care to about Roblox.”

1998

Grace L. (Peck) Beason, Durham, North Carolina, found her “true calling” last year after training in a field called authentic leadership: “After twenty years as a wedding and event planner, I’m now a professional coach. I focus primarily on coaching women in midlife to shift mindset, reach goals and love life. As many of us know, it can be a particularly challenging time of life. Lots of change — careers, family, aging parents ... and powerful coaching helps. I do most of my coaching via phone and video (gracebeasoncoaching.com).”

1998

Robert M. Dolgan was at Montrose Beach in Chicago, pursuing his lifelong pastime of birding, when his sharp eye caught a surprise. “A pair of endangered piping plovers decided to nest on the beach — one of the busiest in the city,” Bob reports. “I began filming the birds.” His subsequent short documentary about the plovers, “Monty and Rose,” was also caught by a few sharp eyes. An official selection of the One Earth Film Festival, it opened to two sold-out nights at the historic Music Box Theatre. The week after it aired on local PBS affiliate WTTW on May 2, NPR Weekend Edition host Scott Simon said of “Monty and Rose,” “The fate of two small piping plovers still amounts to something in this crazy world.”

1998

Brian S. Mason updates: "I moved back to Colorado in 2003 after four years in Washington, D.C., and a year in Berlin, went to law school, joined the D.A.’s office and got married. My wife and I have three wonderful children, a 6-year-old daughter and twin 4-year-old boys, who keep us on our toes, especially now.” Brian was elected district attorney of Colorado’s 17th Judicial District, a large suburban district outside Denver. “Life on the campaign trail is both exciting and overwhelming, but it is a fulfillment of a lifelong dream to run for office."

1998

Stuart M. Rice, Mesa, Arizona, reports “a string of news since the last time I wrote: In December 2018, I donated my kidney to my husband, who is now thriving (please consider being a living donor). I am now the director of digital initiatives with Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State. In that role, I work on several key initiatives, including our Next Education Workforce and support for teachers in their first year.” Stu teaches public yoga classes and between Christmas and New Year’s hosted Matthew J. Borowiecki '98 for some desert hiking, Mexican food and margaritas, and binge watching “The Witcher” and “Lost in Space.”

1999

Caroline A. Donahue has lived since fall 2018 in Berlin, where she teaches English; she also teaches creative writing for an online program based in Canada. She interviews writers as the host of the “Secret Library” podcast and is revising her novel. Thrilled to work on projects in both Berlin and London, she hopes one day her German gets mistaken for local.

2000s

2000

Kristopher J. Armstrong, Bexley, Ohio, chimed in as “a long-time class notes listener but first-time caller.” An attorney, Kris currently works as a master commissioner at the Ohio Supreme Court. With his wife, Gretchen Armstrong, he has two kids, Grace (13) and Jack (11), and two stepkids, Henry (13) and Chris (12). “Sometimes feels like a small (but loving!) orphanage,” he reports. In 2019 Kris completed a four-level improv training program at the Nest Theatre in Columbus, where he now performs regularly with his group, Good Morning Daddies. He’s also a member of the Columbus cast of ComedySportz, a nationwide improv show.

2000

Naomi Raquel Enright, Brooklyn, New York, published her first book, “Strength of Soul,” with 2Leaf Press in April 2019. Her essay “Gratitude For the Sun” was published in the anthology “Sharing Gratitude: Daily Reflections” (Library Partners Press) last December. Meanwhile, she is a bilingual clinical supervisor at the Hunter School of Education, mentoring and assessing student teachers in dual-language classrooms in both public and private schools. “My husband and I are a bit in shock,” she adds, “that our son is now 9, in fourth grade and an avid basketball player. The years are most certainly short.”

2000

Nicole E. Harbauer has been living in Dubai for the past two years. “After some initial hesitation,” she reports, “I have grown to love this vibrant, fascinating city. It’s surprisingly family-friendly, and very easy to get used to the year-round sunshine — not missing Canadian winters at all.” Nicole has been working on identifying and promoting commercial opportunities related to Expo 2020 in Dubai. It since has been postponed until October 2021.

2000

Rachel I. Leber moved from Boulder, Colorado, to Portland, Oregon, last August to pursue a naturopathic doctor program at the National University for Natural Medicine. “My cohort is an amazing group of humans, and I don’t know how I would make it through without their constant teamwork, support and good humor. This feeling of being on the right path is amazing. I’m looking forward to teaching and writing books once I am a doctor. I hope to connect to the music scene here in Portland and perform again. Life just keeps getting richer and richer.” View her creative exploits at rachelrebel.com.

2001

D. Clare Tessman, River Forest, Illinois, writes: "My kid turned 2, and our family is busy with a 14-year-old, an almost-12-year old, and little Lydia.” Still a nurse practitioner with a very busy outpatient clinical practice in neuropsychiatry, Clare is also working on her doctoral project, “Destigmatizing the Psychiatric Evaluation: Listening to the Lived Experience of Voice Hearers,” hoping to graduate in December. “If you haven’t heard of the Hearing Voices Movement and you have any interest, look it up — the best thing to happen in my field, maybe ever."

2001

“After five years of trying, four miscarriages, three rounds of in vitro fertilization, two loving parents and one tiny miracle, James Thomas was born Oct. 12, 2019. We are proud and humble parents to this perfect little man!”

Gillian K. (Pollock) Turney, Tucson, Arizona

2002

“Still in Detroit after 13 years. Having two small businesses in Detroit, Rebel Nell and The Congregation Detroit, we are getting hit hard by COVID-19. I encourage all of you to buy from your local businesses if you can. Shop small — it does make a huge difference.”

Emily H. Peterson

2002

Densil R. Porteous II, Columbus, Ohio, left his job in January to pursue social activism and nonprofit work via his consultancy, DePorteous Consulting. In February he joined the national board of directors for the Human Rights Campaign, the largest LGBTQ civil rights organization in the world. “I couldn’t be more humbled and honored for the opportunity to serve,” he notes. “I continue to serve on boards of several social service organizations that deal with issues of access, equity and education. My partner (technically fiancé as of last summer), Michael Dalton, and I have had a foster daughter for the last two years. She turned 3 in February — parenting is such a joy as well as the most exhausting thing I’ve ever endured! I’ve had fun catching up with folks via Twitter (there’s an entire Kenyon breed there) so look me up: @densilporteous.”

2002

Dana L. Whitley, Annandale, Virginia, is now a public communications writer/editor at the National Library of Medicine. “I’m finally catching up on ‘Downton Abbey’ and other shows and movies now that I’m done with grad school,” she adds.

2003

“Still based in Jakarta, Indonesia (five years!), country director for Newcrest Mining Ltd., occasionally calling WKCO via Skype to request songs that were cool 17 years ago. Expecting to relocate to Denver by the end of the year. Come visit.”

Nathaniel P. Adams

2003

Megan Rafferty Barnes, Columbia, Maryland, went to Los Angeles in February to tape an appearance as a contestant on her fifth game show, “Master Minds,” on the Game Show Network. “I was also able to catch up with Rose N. Talbert Meiri '03 when I was in California,” she adds.

2003

“After years as a stay-at-home parent to my chemically named daughters, Iridia (10) and Helia (8), I returned to grad school full time and completed my second master’s degree in December. I am thrilled to begin my career as an engineer with the Maryland Department of Environment.”

Melissa (Meyer) Knapp, Bethesda, Maryland

2003

Natalie Philpot Pergament, Manchester Center, Vermont, is programs coordinator at The Collaborative, a nonprofit promoting health and wellness through substance-free youth programs. After obtaining her Recovery Coach Certification to continue supporting people struggling with addiction, Natalie is working on her Family Counseling Certification to help alleviate the pain families and friends suffer when a loved one struggles with addiction. She has two daughters, Bryce and Brooklyn.

2004

“I’ve been practicing my hobbies, which have turned out to be quite useful in near-quarantine. My Angora rabbits provide fiber that I spin and weave in my home textile studio. I’ve made plenty of cheese and preserves. My husband, Brian C. Cannon ’05, bakes an awesome loaf of bread and has a well- stocked wood shop for all our building needs. If you ever want to brush up on any pre-industrial skills, let us know!”

Katie (Jackson) Cannon, Reston, Virginia

2004

“My husband, Jeff, and I welcomed our son, William, to the world in December 2019. He’s a big fan of eating, sleeping and his big sister, Zada, almost 3. I have a five-minute commute to work, where I’m a pediatric primary-care psychologist at a medical practice in Salem, Massachusetts. I’m also lucky to see Amy S. Leathe '04 pretty often because she lives right down the street!”

Tai J. Chiappa

2004

Dawn C. (Sokolowski) Gardiner, Mentor, Ohio, welcomed George Thomas Gardiner into the world on March 12, 2020. “The Gardiner Family Homeschool will be taking an extended spring break this year to accommodate and welcome its newest member. John (8) is excelling in second grade, Dominic (6) is a superstar kindergartner — as awesome at math as his older brother — and Emily (2) mostly prefers to sit on the school table, preferably on top of whichever book needs to be read. She also enjoys practicing her penmanship on her brothers’ books. Thankfully the Sharpies have been moved to a secure location.”

2004

Harrison David Rivers is back home in St. Paul, Minnesota, after a three-week writing residency at Duke University. His short play “I’m Just Saying” was featured as part of the 24 Hour Plays’ Viral Monologues project and was mentioned in the New York Times.

2005

Alison D. Diegel, Rocky River, Ohio, is completing her first year as a PTSD therapist at the Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs after spending five years in homeless outreach/housing. “The work is monumentally fulfilling,” she shares. “I still do some private-practice work with Erin B. Cooper Carter ’04 at her practice in Westlake, Ohio.” She and Gregory C. Scheiderer ’05 were looking forward to seeing everyone at reunion, but “if you’re in the Cleveland area and want to do water sports — yes, on Lake Erie. It’s fine! — go cycling or just grab a drink, hit us up!”

2005

“My first class note! I’m living in La Honda, California, with my wife, Casey Smith Schine ’06, and dog, Nicodemus Franklin Stinky-butt Schine (no formal degrees). Casey is finishing her Ph.D. at Stanford in polar oceanography. I’m a professional nerd at Google during the week and a firefighter/EMT nights and weekends. I love projects! And friends! And sirens! Come visit! We’re super close (0.5 mile) to the LSD cultural epicenter of the United States.”

Gabriel B. Schine

2005

“In 2018 I started working with Central American, South American and Cuban migrant children, refugees and asylum seekers who crossed the U.S.–Mexican border, providing psychological trauma therapeutic care with the Office of Refugee Resettlement. In late 2019, I was granted an amazing opportunity at an international private school in Germany’s Düsseldorf region, where I am currently the school counselor department chair for middle school and high school. The school represents over 50 nations/cultures of both students and faculty, and we’re growing.”

Michelle L.M. Schmitz

2006

“Life is good in Richmond, Virginia. I’m the garden teacher at the local public elementary school. I see all 550 students every other week. We learn about plants, seeds, weather, measuring, compost and so much more. The school has 21 raised beds, an herb garden, a rain garden, an edible forest and a pollinator garden. My older son, Sam, is in second grade, and my younger son, Owen, is in pre-K. My husband, Matthew R. Schefft ’04, is a pediatric hospitalist at Virginia Commonwealth University.”

Katherine E. Lainhart

2006

John D. Sadoff, Somerville, Massachusetts, runs his own chess tutoring business, ChessMate Tutors. “I have been providing chess instruction to private students and schools,” Johnny explains, “currently providing all instruction online. Any Kenyon alumni interested in playing a game of chess, look me up on chess.com — username Chess2470.”

2006

Kelsey R. (Rotwein) Schagemann and her husband, Joe, welcomed a son, Will Joseph Schagemann, on March 4. “At a time when things are very uncertain in the world, we feel grateful for the joy that Will and big sister Talia (age 2) bring to our lives every day,” she writes. “We are holed up in our home in the Lakeview neighborhood of Chicago, baking a lot of banana bread, reading books, inventing toddler-friendly games and doing our best to stay healthy and sane.”

2007

Sarah E. (Brieschke) Ryan, Ypsilanti, Michigan, moved to a new home and welcomed a son in July. “Isaac makes us a family of four,” she writes. “True to his name, he is full of smiles and laughter. Big sister Sophia (4) enjoys her friends and teachers at preschool, though is loving the extra time at home even more now. We are thankful to have jobs with flexibility to work from home. Knowing that Kenyon students are finishing the semester at home has led me to reminisce about so many memorable things about our senior year in particular. Even the oddities of eating in Ernst with all the construction going on has become a fond memory, knowing current students don’t have the chance to be on campus together!”

2007

Elizabeth E. Stubbins and her husband, Eric, welcomed a baby boy, Vincent James Baratta, into the world in September. They live in Chicago along with their black Labrador, Nisi. Liz is a lawyer with a legal aid organization doing civil litigation. Eric is an IT engineer who is, Liz writes, “lucky enough to work from home in the office nook that Liz has filled with house plants.”

2008

“This past year marked 10 years of living in Washington, D.C. In that time, I’ve earned a master’s of information management from University of Maryland and continued to work as an information scientist in government and the private sector. In November 2019, Charles Crawford III and I were married at an arboretum in Media, Pennsylvania. Much like the music of a Kenyon lounge party, the best alumni of the ‘70s, ‘80s and today were in attendance — including my parents (Anne B. Chamberlin ’76 and Joel E. Turner ’76), aunt (Anne Allen Chamberlin ’83), maid of honor (Jean E. Turner ’10) and many more. The multi-generational Kenyon gang kept the dance floor going until the music shut off.”

Delia M. (Turner) Crawford

2008

Elly Deutch Moody, Evanston, Illinois, and her husband, Brent, welcomed their first baby, Maya, into the world on Feb. 19, 2020. “Couldn’t be more thrilled to be parents! She is our everything,” Elly writes. “Thanks to everyone from Kenyon who reached out and shared their support while we take off on this new adventure of parenthood.”

2009

Leah R. Finn married her partner, Will Myers, last fall, with many Kenyon alumni in attendance. “Sara K. Hunkler ’08 even gave a speech!” Leah reports. “Will and I have been in the Bay Area since 2016, currently living in Oakland, California. I’m a product manager at Workday.”

2009

Linda T. Pear and Daniel A. Takacs, with 2-year-old daughter Greta, mourned the loss of their little sister-to-be at 22 weeks gestation. Aria Takacs Pear was loved deeply. They are choosing to share their story in the hope that it will empower other families who have experienced loss to speak out. “You are not alone.”

2010s

2010

Julia L. DeNiro, Millersburg, Ohio, passed her registered sanitarian exam in January and is now a registered sanitarian at the Holmes County Health Department.

2010

“We are in the throes of three children 3-and-under and navigating being self-employed as well, in the fields of music and education, using our backgrounds to build businesses that help us balance work and family life. I’ve worked remotely, freelancing in education for several years now, and my husband, Charlie, and I work together creating rehearsal tracks for choirs. It’s a crazy, busy, loud life but we are loving it! We are house-hunting in our hometown of St. Louis and investigating some interesting home- school options for our children.”

Carrie E. (Walther) Kinnison, St. Louis, Missouri

2010

Matthew D. Sargent married Brenna Kelly in New York on Nov. 9, 2019. “Liberal arts students dominated the guest list,” Matt reports, “as the bride graduated from Davidson College (Kenyon of the South?) in 2010. Chase T. Kreuter '10 delivered a reading while Basil M. Kahwash '10 and Nathaniel F. Gray '10 kept the guests in line as ushers.” Additional Kenyon guests included Justin J. Bain '10, Christopher G. Freedman ’12, Sydnee M. Lindblom ’14, William H. VandenBerg '10, Daniel E. Verhave '10 and Charles A. Yukevich '10.

2010

Pratima R. Shanbhag and her husband, Robert D. (Derek) Barbato ’13, are delighted to announce the arrival of “sweet baby boy Aden Salvatore Barbato,” she writes. “He is an absolute dream come true. After I complete my fellowship this fall, I am happy to say that I will be staying on as an attending physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.”

2010

“I am still working in the Center for Global Engagement, but I am now the program coordinator. It has been quite the wild ride with COVID- 19. We are diligently keeping track of where all our off-campus study and international students are around the world.”

Samantha M. Turner

2010

“I’m writing this from our home quarantine, where my husband, daughter and I are becoming experts at social distancing. As I’m sure is the case for many of you, our house is now our office, bar, restaurant, day care, gym and everything in between. My daughter, Eleanor, just turned 6 months old. Everyone told us that parenthood would be hard, but no one told us it would also be so much fun! I’m still working as a sales operations manager with Jacobs and active with the Cincinnati Regional Alumni Association and the 2010 Class Committee.”

Michelle A. von Hirschberg, West Chester, Ohio

2011

Kali (Greff) Bizzul sends nuptials news: “I tied the knot to a very good dude and fellow Colorado native named Jason Bizzul last September, decided on sharing a name with him, and we welcomed some beautiful Kenyonites to help celebrate.” They included Keiko P. Matsuno '11, Patrick T. DePriest '11, Ayako Tokuyama Garduque '11 and Gian M. Garduque ’12, Daniel A. Groberg '11 and Mary Margaret Fletcher Groberg '11, Eric M. Cameron '11 and Kanmani Venkateswaran '11. “It was a big shindig,” she reports, “rolling a few days of celebration and many cultural traditions together, including an Indian bride-making ceremony, a Chinese tea ceremony and all the trappings of a very Colorado outdoor wedding. Other than that, I’m still loving my work in marketing for Verblio, a content-writing platform where I get to write most days about writing — equal parts meta and nerdy fun, just as it sounds.”

2011

“Greetings from the Scooby-Doo ghost town that is Boston! Very strange to see nobody on the streets and to not sit in traffic during rush hour. I took the bar exam and can safely say that nothing is harder. I have been a legal assistant at a large law firm for almost a year. Outside the office, I’ve been playing Dungeons & Dragons for the last two years with Laura A. Spiegler ’10 and our friends. I was back at Kenyon in September for the BSU 50th Anniversary Celebration: an amazing experience being in community with so many alumni. The village is so different now, but it’s a good different. Hope everyone is staying healthy, moisturized and hydrated during this crazy time, and remember to prioritize your mental health daily.”

Sasha Pauline Fanny-Holston

2011

Shelley Fort, Brooklyn, New York, and her sister, Claire Fort ’07, wrapped up the shoot- ing for two episodes of their film project last fall. “Our web series, ‘Dear Sister,’ had lots of help from Kenyon alums on set: William H. Adashek ’05, Aeneas Hemphill ’12, Charlotte Bea Woolf ’12, Laura Goehrke ’10 and many more who donated to our campaign so we could make a piece of our dreams come true!” Shelley and Claire, who are submitting to various festivals, welcome your involvement: “Slide into our DMs @fortsisters/ @shelleyfort or email us at fortsistersfilm@ gmail.com.” Shelley has been acting in the Broadway national tour of “The Play That Goes Wrong.”

2011

Laura A. Paul finished her doctorate in agricultural economics at UC Davis in August and started a postdoctoral research fellowship with the Center for Experimental and Applied Economics at the University of Delaware. “I also was delighted,” she adds, “to attend the wedding of Margaret J. (Maggie) Higby ’12 and Kurt Ericksen in Vermont. I had a lovely visit from Meghan E. Henshall ’12. At the moment I am working remotely and practicing social distancing back in North Carolina.”

2011

Tricia M. Shimamura is a candidate for New York City Council in 2021, hoping to represent the Upper East Side and Roosevelt Island. “After years of working in local government, I’m thrilled to announce that I’m running for office, and I’m extremely proud to be the only woman of color and only mother in the race.” Tricia has enjoyed meeting neighbors— among them, Kenyon grads — along the campaign trail. “We’re still very close with other Kenyon alums, including Benjamin E. McMillan '11, Richard Wylde '11, Mia J. Addiego Wylde ’12, Saul B. Nathan-Kazis '11, Phoebe E. Hillemann '11 and Rachel N. Oscar '11 — all of whom came to NYC recently for the birth and baptism of my son, Theodore ‘Teddy’ Shimamura Gibor.”

2011

Eric J. Sutton, Omaha, Nebraska, updates that he joined the Gross & Welch law firm as an associate in the spring. After graduating from William & Mary Law School in 2016, Eric clerked for Judge Riko Bishop on the Nebraska Court of Appeals. Before joining Gross & Welch, he worked as an associate with a law firm in Lincoln, Nebraska.

2012

“After graduating from Johns Hopkins’ MFA program in 2018, I spent the following year in Portugal on a Fulbright grant. I’ve been back in Baltimore about eight months now, working at my other alma mater, Hopkins, as a speechwriter for the university’s president — an unexpected but interesting and challenging post. Baltimore has turned out to be a great place. I have the chance to see Sarah E. Schulz '12 around town and make occasional trips down to D.C. to see suburbanites Brittany M. Grabel '12 and Scott R. Chernoff '12.”

Michael E. Broida

2012

Virginia (Rushton) Koebley married husband Sam in May 2019 and spent the next five months taking what she termed a “honeybatical”: vacationing and working around the world. “Scuba diving in Belize, commercial salmon fishing in Alaska, ‘taste-testing’ meat pies and ales in England, sipping wine in Italy, attending World Cup rugby matches in Japan and working a coffee and macadamia nut farm (and more scuba diving) in Hawaii,” she details. “It was so fabulous. We are pretty happy to be back at home in Chattanooga, Tennessee, though, settling into our landscape work!”

2013

Sarah E. (Krumholz) Adler is still directing High Trails Outdoor Education Center in Florissant, Colorado. “On Feb. 29,” she reports,“James T. Plunkett '13 flew in from India via El Salvador to marry me and Mikey Adler at Devil’s Thumb Ranch in Colorado. Max Elder '13 and Jonathan S. (Yoni) Wilkenfeld '13 represented the spirit of Old Kenyon well on the dance floor.”

2013

Lauren E. Amrhein writes from Paris, France, where she was in lockdown: “It’s hard to be far from friends and family in the States, but I’ve made my home here the past six years, so I’m trying to find glimmers of gratitude in this strange time. Like a sunny courtyard, the chubby cats outside my window, kind neighbors and plenty of extra time to relax and read and adapt. I’ve been teaching English as a Second Language online for the past five years and continue to mentor new teachers for VIPKid. Reach out if you have teaching experience and would like to try your hand at this.” Lauren released her new single, “Comedown,” on Spotify under the artist name Folklaur. “I’m also in a country cover band called the Left Bank Hanks with some friends here in Paris,” she adds.

2013

“I’m loving my job on the fashion team at Goop here in my hometown of LA. I’m also enjoying running my handbag line, Unalome, which supports a beautiful weaving tradition indigenous to Ecuador. Check us out at shopunalome.com.”

Cambria L. Foden, Pacific Palisades, California

2013

“I am increasingly appreciative of how technology still allows me to connect with friends over video conferencing. It appears digital happy hours are the new norm for the time being! If anyone wants to connect, let me know.”

Tristan J. Neviska, Fredericktown, Ohio

2013

Jonathan Spiegler continues work on his doctorate in political science at Michigan State. “I am finally (mostly) done with taking classes, so ‘only’ have to write the dissertation now,” Jon muses. “The best part is being able to write it from home with the invaluable assistance of my dog, Nico.”

2013

Alexandra C. Thieman has been living in Philadelphia since graduating with her M.S.W. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2017. Ali is an intake coordinator for the Department of Psychiatry at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, practices competitive judo and is actively involved in the Philly vegan community.

2014

Natalie Thielen Helper, Brooklyn, New York, shares that her “proudest achievement of 2019 was getting arrested at a direct action protesting for immigrant rights.” She’s continuing her activism through her Unitarian Universalist church and affirms that she “still believes that a better world is possible.”

2014

Kelsey T. Rice wrapped up her M.F.A. in interactive media and games at USC’s film school in May 2019 and is now producer at Mobius Digital, an LA-based video game company. In her spare time she role-plays a chaotic good druid in a Dungeons & Dragons 5e campaign, tends to a baby Monstera Deliciosa plant and plays the piano.

2015

Eleanor D. Knipp freed herself from the clutches of the tech industry in San Francisco and crossed the deserts and hills to land in the mountains of Colorado, joining her girlfriend Dante G. Valvo ’16. Norie looks forward to “Survivor” watch parties with Dante and Charlotte S. Detchon ’13, hiking in the wildflowers, adopting a cat and visiting Mesa L. Owen’s ('15) farm in Norwood, Colorado. She also looks forward to finding her soul again.

2015

Javier Leung married Johanna Lindh in January. They’re still living happily in their little apartment in Helsinki, Finland, and working from home due to company coronavirus policies. In February, Jay flew on a work trip to Dubai, where he got a chance to catch up with Max L. Rappoport ’14 over Punjabi food. With the pandemic hitting the airline industry hard, Jay expected a rocky year but said that as a healthy young man living in a country with universal health care, he’s probably one of the more fortunate ones. He adds: “Stay safe, stay healthy, take care of the elderly and vulnerable people in your lives, and remember to wash your hands!”

2016

Sarah K. (Ash) Fariash, South San Francisco, California, enjoys “living in the Bay Area with three needy cats (but, like, they’re all needy in a different way). Trying my hand at blogging. Really just trying to find an outlet for all this feminist rage, but aren’t we all?”

2016

Donald (Aaron) McIlhenny notes that he “is thriving in his mid-20s by becoming an expert on every type of fancy chips Brooklyn has to offer.”

2016

Madeline R. Thompson, St. Louis, Missouri, began a new job as a clinical research coordinator for a study with mothers who use marijuana during pregnancy. Madi explains: “We follow their baby’s development from the first trimester to the time that their child is 2. I get to be with newborns at work, which is the dream!”

2016

Haley M. Townsend, Pierceton, Indiana, shared these adjusted plans in the coronavirus era: “Haley will probably buy a Nintendo Switch so she and Noah P. Winters ’15 can play Mario Kart, which could be a decent alternative to their (now postponed) honeymoon trip to Arizona.”

2017

Nicholas S. Maryan is “holding it down in Chicago” with roommates Alexander W. (Zander) Nethercutt ’16 and Maxwell D. Siegrist ’16 and enjoys “more-than-weekly happy hours with Connor E. Merley '17, Julia L. Plottel '17, Benjamin D. Mackessy ’16 and, sometimes, Garrett D. Stalker ’15. Newly joined by our little Booth grad school star Benjamin D. Payner ’15 for the time being!” At the time of writing, Nick reported he was quarantined with Zander while Max waited it out at his parents’ house on the bay in Dewey, Delaware. “Many more video chat happy hours to come!” he adds.

2017

Reagan L. Neviska finally learned to drive at age 24, she informs. She recently accepted a position in the Office of Information Technology at Ohio University, and is a newly inducted board member of the Survivor Advocacy Outreach Program. She has been baking lots of bread and scones, which is “probably her best achievement,” she submits.

2017

Nathaniel E. Shahan, New York City, recently left Latham & Watkins and became a senior analyst at the strategic communications firm Kekst CNC. He credits the Kenyon Collegian with preparing him for this role. While starting a new job in the midst of a pandemic was not ideal, he observes, “Meeting new colleagues on Zoom was less awkward than freshman orientation.”

2017

Julia M. Waldow lives in New York City, working as an associate producer for CNN’s international business show “Quest Means Business.” This is her third year rooming with “the wonderful Amy R. Schatz '17 and Victoria Ungvarsky '17.” In her spare time, Julia can be found “listening to podcasts, sampling hot chocolate and bemoaning the fact that ‘You’ve Got Mail’ only has a 6.6 rating on IMDB.”

2018

Rebecca L. Frank has been working as an au pair for “a lovely family just outside of Paris, France,” she reports. “It has been such a great opportunity to work on my language skills, learn more about French culture and see more of the world!”

2018

Maxwell C. Warren, San Marino, California, started law school in the fall and is “absolutely fired up!” He adds: “Since Kenyon, I’ve been feeding my cat amply and I make sure to pet him when he needs the company. I regularly attend marquee boxing fight nights as a credentialed media member. Please read my work on maxboxing.com. I really miss my former baseball coach, Matt Burdette.”

2018

Meera C. White finished her master’s degree in the public humanities program at Brown University in May. “Looking forward to moving to Washington, D.C.,” she writes, “and entering the museum, cultural institution and cultural heritage field.”

2019

“Erica recently learned the Renegade dance.”

Erica E. Christie, Overland Park, Kansas

2019

Austin J. Cody finished his first year as a master’s student at the University of Illinois studying choral conducting. He informs, “I direct two choirs, the Men’s Glee Club and a large church choir in town. Recently, I conducted a choral-orchestral work for the first time (most of my conducting is with choir and no orchestra). The piece was Handel’s Chandos Anthem No. 3. I’ve also begun singing professionally in the area!”

2019

“Here’s what you missed in Cleveland: I spent the summer (of 2019) waiting tables and loudly singing along during open mic nights at the bar where I’ve worked for the past four years. Major bonding with the staff there. In the fall, I stage-managed a world-premiere production with the city’s newest theater company, Nightbloom. Then I started an internship with Dobama Theatre, which is kind of like Cleveland’s off-Broadway situation. It has been incredible to work on such new and vibrant plays. I’m also reading so many books! Wow! Obviously, coronavirus made a lot of things very uncertain, but I’m trying to make the most of this time and reconnect with people. It’s important to spread love and light right now, so I hope everyone is doing well.”

Arianna R. Marino

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