1950s

1951

The Rev. Keith D. Briggs, Brookville, Pennsylvania, and his “old roomie” James Horace Jones phone each other at least once a week. Darr also speaks often with Deb Kunhardt, daughter of Henry (deceased) and mother of Aidan K. Biglow ’23, now a Kenyon student.

1952

“They say no news is good news, and that’s my situation. Just dealing with doctors, medical appointments, exercise and some good reading. Like an old buddy once said, ‘Been better, been worse.’ Oh — I’m enjoying baking and eating various kinds of scones. Take care, fellows!”

Allen B. Ballard Jr., Clifton Park, New York

1953

Ronald R. Ryan has called Jupiter, Florida, home for 30 years and enjoys good health. “I have just stopped playing tennis, but Mig and I both play golf two or three times a week.”

1956

“Bobbe and I now have grandchildren graduating from various colleges!”

John G. Hartong, Crystal River, Florida

1957

“For the past year and a half, Ronald E. Kendrick, Bill R. Abbott, The Rev. Ron E. Greiser, Jim D. Morgan, Al N. Halverstadt Jr., R. Brad Bennett, Henry J. Steck, Bob B. Kohn, Ernie A. Norehad, Phil W. Fox and I have been meeting monthly by Zoom. It’s brought us together in many unexpected ways. As might be expected, politics intruded on some discussions, but usually we found common ground that cooled tempers. What I found most interesting was how often we returned to our Kenyon education when arguing different points of view. Considering that we graduated 65 years ago, it’s an impressive validation of the Kenyon education.

Donald A. Fischman, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania

1957

Ronald E. Kendrick, Columbus, Ohio, reports he is “living proof of the adage that retirement isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.” Ron retired from orthopedic practice
16 years ago but still serves the Social Security Administration as a medical expert advising judges in disability determination. “Not the road to riches,” he explains,
“since the fee allowed for medical experts hasn’t been updated for 20 years. But I enjoyed applying all the skills and knowledge I worked so hard to achieve since medical school, training and private practice years. By the grace of God, I haven’t lost my marbles yet and am able to continue this satisfying work.”

1958

Martin A. Berg moved to Boca Raton, Florida, last October, where he and Adrienne are near their youngest grandchildren. Marty retired as the oldest high school football coach in Ohio, he reports. “Great experience. I am hoping to do something here. Great things are happening at Kenyon. I am proud to have been a part. The Lowry Center is the best — Bill was a teammate and a friend.”

1958

“Ann and I continue to enjoy retirement by supporting Karen immigrants in Buffalo and keeping our fingers on the pulse of our community. I have found the Buffalo News usually publishes my letters, so I have spoken out about such issues as the need for vaccination, gun control and historic preservation, and against API discrimination. So far, our good health allows us to climb our mountain in Maine and me to continue crewing in Buffalo Harbor Sailing Club races on Lake Erie.

Andrew R. Graham, Buffalo, New York

1959

“I returned home from a monthlong trip to Boynton Beach, Florida — longest vacation away from home I’ve ever taken. Life has been good to me. My health has been good, and I keep busy volunteering at a local golf course, which provides all the free golf I want. My other happy place is my garden and yard, where I spend as much time as weather will permit. The current crisis in Eastern Europe reminds me of the student from Hungary whom Kenyon fostered in 1956 during that revolution. It seems incredible that such turmoil is happening again.

Max M. Bermann, Canton, Massachusetts

1959

Robert J. Clawson, Acton, Massachusetts, was a featured speaker on “An Oral History of Anne Sexton and Her Kind,” broadcast online by Harvard’s Woodberry Poetry Room in December. “In that I knew Anne well, and taught with her, I’m also being interviewed for an article, a documentary film and a new biography. I suspect I’ll not be fully retired till I’ve expired.”

1959

Fred C. Mench, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, teaches Latin at Middle Tennessee State but is “figuring to wind up next year when my adjunct successor
has had a chance to teach all four courses in our sequence. My wife of 22 years, Mary, and I live two doors down from her granddaughter and two great-grand-daughters.”

1959

“I continue to have great nostalgic moments of Kenyon, which prepared me for a successful life. I stay involved with Air Force and civic endeavors and became vice president of a new Virginia political action committee, the Proud Patriots of Smith Mountain Lake. I’m grateful to have expanded our membership to over 100 members in just a year. For fun, we continue to enjoy our antique ChrisCraft boats on the lake, with many friend and family visits.

Brig. Gen. Roger C. Smith, Moneta, Virginia

1960s

1960

Richard M. Regnante, Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts, recalls “many fond memories of my days at Kenyon. After 50 years of practice as a cardiologist, I retired two years ago. Living on Cape Cod. Skiing in the winter, sailing in the spring and summer in Newport, Rhode Island, waters.”

1960

“Judy and I are 83, married happily 55 years. Judy had total hip replacement and is healing nicely. Three daughters and five grandkids — Maxwell in his third year at West Point. We attended a monthlong family reunion in Norway that began with a 10day visit to Paris but no more cruises, as Judy gets lost. We are happy, reasonably well financially, but will most likely not be visiting any more class reunions. Jim Hawk, my best friend from Kenyon visited ‘the Island’ several years ago, and I miss him greatly. As Barry Auger once posted, ‘He was one of the good ones.’

John E. Rusing, Findlay, Ohio

1961

Daniel O. Holland, Waynesboro, Virginia, shares, “I always knew I would be grateful for attending Kenyon. However, not until I retired and could compose poetry to my heart’s content — and to the dismay of my Facebook friends — did I realize the magnitude of my indebtedness to our alma mater, in particular to Mr. Ransom and Dr. Roelofs!” Dan is active in a poetry group and Shenandoah Valley Trout Unlimited. “Virginia continues to confirm our decision to flee Wisconsin winters. Out of the blue, Patty got a call begging her to teach bassoon at Virginia Tech. So now each week she drives two hours to teach for an hour. She is not complaining. The Feb. 20 Waynesboro Symphony concert was an absolutely triumphal affair; her being able to play both bassoon and contrabassoon with such a marvelous orchestra brings us great joy.”

1961

Daniel O. Holland, Waynesboro, Virginia, shares, “I always knew I would be grateful for attending Kenyon. However, not until I retired and could compose poetry to my heart’s content — and to the dismay of my Facebook friends — did I realize the magnitude of my indebtedness to our alma mater, in particular to Mr. Ransom and Dr. Roelofs!” Dan is active in a poetry group and Shenandoah Valley Trout Unlimited. “Virginia continues to confirm our decision to flee Wisconsin winters. Out of the blue, Patty got a call begging her to teach bassoon at Virginia Tech. So now each week she drives two hours to teach for an hour. She is not complaining. The Feb. 20 Waynesboro Symphony concert was an absolutely triumphal affair; her being able to play both bassoon and contrabassoon with such a marvelous orchestra brings us great joy.”

1961

“Betty and I have spent the past half year at home, vaccinated and boosted, limiting our contacts both for selfpreservation and to help reduce transmission of the COVID virus. Over Labor Day 2021 we did visit our son and his family in California and in November 2021 our daughter and her family in Georgia, on our way to a weeklong Caribbean cruise. It had been 16 to 22 months since seeing our children and grandchildren. The cruise was a taste of what we remembered as normal, on a ship carrying a third of its passenger capacity. All went well — a welcome change. Now back home resuming our quiet existence. Betty revised a book chapter and I continue to serve as a consultant, so some mental stimulation occurred.

David E. Lenz, Columbus, Ohio

1962

Byron S. Dunham, Chicago, shares memories of Kenyon: “During freshman year, about 20 of us were assigned rooms on the third floor of creaky old Bexley Hall, at the farthest north edge of the campus. We felt very special! I bought a secondhand English Humber bike for $15 for getting to class and meals at Peirce. People were always ‘borrowing’ it. My second year landed me and another fellow in West Wing with the Dekes, although we were not Dekes, and my ride was a 1951 Studebaker convertible painted fireengine red — also often borrowed.” Byron joined the Collegian, Student Council, Social Committee and PreMed Club, leaving the Hill for the U.S. Army, Northwestern University and a journalism career with the Toledo Blade and The Rotarian International Magazine. “Today I live with my marriage partner, retired architect Dick Hanna, in Chicago’s Lincoln Park and Skidaway Island, Georgia, depending upon the weather,” he concludes.

1962

“Our old black walnut tree no longer stands out front; it fell with others in the tornado of 2018. Its history is inscribed in the sculptures: the insults from droughts, storms, man and diseases — engraved for us to see with lines that show the years which suddenly came to an end. Our black walnut tree was planted around the time our democracy was formed. Both stood straight and tall for all these years until they have now been weakened by disease and threatened by insurrection. These were my thoughts as I cut and sanded, trying to capture the feelings and emotions of the pandemic and the social unrest created by an inept response by our government. I have taken a few of the 75 wood sculptures out to pasture where visitors can reflect on what has been happening to them in this COVID memorial exhibit.

Patrick Eggena, Carmel, New York

1962

Harvey F. Lodish received an honorary degree last year from Case Western Reserve University and, as a Kenyon trustee emeritus, also spoke at Commencement before watching his granddaughter Emma Steinert ’21 graduate. In December, he was honored with the Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology by the American Society of Hematology, which recognized his five decades of research. A short film featuring two Nobel Prizewinning students of his, recognizing his career, is available on YouTube.

1962

Robert K. Stevens, San Pedro, California, reflecting on war in Eastern Europe, remembers a moment from 1968 when he was a young foreign service officer, just returned from his first posting in South America. He found himself attending a dinner party whose guest of honor was Secretary of State Dean Rusk. “During cocktails before dinner, someone dragged me over to Rusk to introduce me as one of his minions. Small talk was interrupted by the screeching tires of a black limo, which drove up on the lawn. A Marine officer in full dress jumped out and ran over to Rusk holding a sheet of paper. Rusk read it, turned to me and showed me its one sentence: ‘The Russians have just invaded Czechoslovakia.’ And then everyone — the entire top echelon of the State Department — went back to drinking and chatting as if it were inconsequential. A halfhour later, when the secretary was inside the house changing into black tie for dinner, my wife, carrying our baby with a very dirty and smelly diaper, having been told it was the changing room, burst into the bedroom where Rusk was standing in his underwear. He said hello and suggested she use the bathroom while he finished dressing. His security guard then escorted her back to the party. Needless to say, we did not get a repeat invitation.”

1963

“ From time to time, the jokes and other odd things I did at school make me break out laughing. Like the time throwing Brussels sprouts across the dining hall led to a memorable food riot. Or the time a waiter carrying a tray with all twelve settings started to walk very fast until he got to the kitchen door, which someone had locked: The tray — along with the language — went flying. Or, while someone else was showering, reaching and turning off the hot water. Ah, those were good days. It was Dr. Roelofs, I believe, who told us that ‘a little nonsense every now and then is relished by the best of men.’”

James P. Keyes, Columbus, Ohio

1963

“It is hard to believe next year will be our 60th, the 64th year from our arrival in September 1959. Jane and I have gotten through the pandemic, notwithstanding that we missed travel, family and friends. In November we were delighted by the visit of our four children and 12 grandchildren who, for Thanksgiving and to celebrate my 80th birthday, came from Houston; St. Louis; Atlanta; Johns Creek, Georgia; Poolesville, Maryland, and New York City. I had a knee replaced in midDecember and am making a terrific recovery. I am still getting work from clients and enjoy the mental exercise, and Jane is still making her pottery. We hope to play golf again when the weather warms.”

Neal M. Mayer, Millsboro, Delaware

1963

Eric A. Wagner calls his Gainesville, Florida, retirement community “terrific.” Writing midFebruary, he reported “sitting on my screened porch, with a small lake just a few feet away, enjoying an almost 80degree day full of sun. Ducks, egrets, herons, wood storks and other birds are here virtually all the time. It is a nature lovers’ paradise. Mostly I play bridge and water volleyball, and represent my building on the resident advisory forum.” Eric has visited 170 countries, all the continents, including Antarctica several times, “and the North Pole on a Russian nuclear icebreaker,” he informs, “and now my leisurely retirement. Life as a professor emeritus is good!”

1963

Theodore L. Walch, Studio City, California, still teaches fulltime at HarvardWestlake School in Los Angeles: 70 students in three sections of cinema studies and one section of philosophy in art and science. “I plan to spend six weeks in Paris this summer,” he adds, “as a postscript to my last several years researching Truffaut’s ‘The 400 Blows’. I had a skirmish with lung cancer last year but, thanks to CedarsSinai, a dogged internist and a brilliant oncologist, I’m completely out of the woods. I thank Kenyon for the kind of education that in its broad strokes prepared me for the work I do today.”

1964

“After retirement as a CIO, I found a fascinating organization of people, the Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College, where people from all walks of life share their experience and knowledge in a rich continuing education program. Additionally, I teach a class or two in information technology at both the graduate and undergraduate level just to forcibly keep up, and I volunteer at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital. We are happily ensconced in our island home.

William C. Cross III, St. Pete Beach, Florida

1964

Stephen B. Goldenberg, Naples, Florida, expresses gratitude in hearing that the class of 1964 remains busy and active. "I am still an active attorney in both Florida and Massachusetts." Stephen was recently elected vice president of the Jewish Congregation of Marco Island, treasurer of Naples PFLAG, Inc. and a trustee for his Falmouth, Massachusetts, condominium. "I guess that means it's still too soon to relax and retire!"

1965

“I have had the pleasure of working as a producer on a new ballet production, Nureyev: Legend and Legacy. A large scale, gala-styled production with the finest dancers in the world, it will be presented at Drury Lane opening September 5. It is fun but very challenging!

David F. Banks, London, England

1965

Robin F. Goldsmith and Janice Goldsmith of Needham, Massachusetts, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in Kennebunk Beach, Maine. David Long, a member of their original wedding party, joined the festivities.

1965

Fredrick J. McGavran shares that one of his best stories, titled “An Invasive Species,” appeared in New English Review. “If this isn’t enough, you can hear me reading my satires at thelaughingsatirist.com,” he adds. “I only write fiction when I have an idea to write about. The rest of the time, I am a chaplain at Episcopal Retirement Services in Cincinnati. Monthly I phone Bob Pratt and lunch with Jim Miller and fraternity brothers William M. ‘Bill’ Lamb ’64, James A. ‘Jim’ Sims
’64 and William V. ‘Bill’ Coombs ’64. We seem to be holding up well. I enjoy what I am doing so much I don’t feel a need for exotic travel or other adventures.”

1965

Alex Valchuk returned to Greenville, Tennessee — “forever, Karen and I hope” — after moving to Florida in 2017 to care for Karen’s mother. “She passed away in late 2021, which gave us the option of staying in Florida or returning to where we belong. So here we are. We have an almost hilltop home with a panoramic view of the Appalachian Mountains and the valleys between.”

1966

Alden D. Carter, McCall, Idaho, reports, “Powder skiing this December was beyond phenomenal. In a 28day stretch, we had 18 days of more than three inches of fresh snow at 17 degrees or less. Wow! Then on Jan. 6 the faucet turned off." Writing in March, he wondered if it was too early start to mountain biking. “Real estate has been off the charts since COVID,” Alden adds.

1966

Frank B. Dibble describes the snowbird life as “slowly evolving.” Back and forth between Rye, New Hampshire, and Cape Coral, Florida, over the winter, with responsibilities as president of his local Rotary Club, Frank was ready for those responsibilities to end in June. Mae remained in Florida, “wisely avoiding the cold and snows,” he writes. “Our latest adventure is a new puppy. Don’t ask me why two 77yearolds would get a puppy!” Their schnoodle — a miniature schnau
zerpoodle mix — now housetrained, is “very cute and very smart. We both continue to work part time, I as a Compassus Hospice medical director and Mae in law, primarily estate planning. We are well and hope you are the same.”

1966

Denis B. Pierce, Evanston, Illinois, joined fellow Dekes for a February reunion on Captiva Island coorganized with Arthur H. Stroyd Jr. ’67 and Walter R. Butler ’68. “Also attending were R. Barry Tatgenhorst ’67 and wife Ann, Edward B. Gaines ’68, John M. Capron ’64, Cray J. Coppins and wife Peggy, Michael R. Scadron ’68 and partner Jean Hett.”

1967

Brian J. Derry enjoyed winter in Missoula, Montana, having moved there from Colorado in 2006. “Kathy and I have really treasured being a walk away to streams and rivers — the Clark Fork of the Columbia — as well as walking and hiking trails. We have partnered with Missoula Aging Services to conduct workshops on conversations about what you want those close to you to know about your desires for care if/when you cannot speak for yourself.” Brian is active with the nonprofit Home ReSource, keeping usable materials out of landfills, as well as Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Montana. "Our current focus is supporting refugees coming to Missoula and providing shelter, food and counseling to our homeless population," he adds. "A special joy is being involved in the lives of two of our grandchildren, now in high school."

1967

David W. Fey Jr., Newport Beach, California, shares this comprehensive note: "After graduation I got married and then reported to Air Force pilot training at Reese AFB, Texas, in July. In September 1968 I started flying C141 transports, stationed at McCord AFB in Tacoma, Washington, upgrading to aircraft commander. In November 1970 I was in Southeast Asia flying CH53C special operations helicopters until 1972. In 1972 and 1973 I spent two months flying between Christchurch, New Zealand, and McMurdo, Antarctica, with a brief visit to the South Pole. In 1974 I was transferred to Sacramento to start a new jet program. My daughter Hilary was born in 1975." David subsequently flew for Air California, later purchased by American Airlines, from which he retired “on the last possible day” in 2005 at age 60. “Yes, I flew on 9/11/2001,” he remembers, “going from JFK to LAX.” A retired Air Force Reserve colonel, he spends a week lifeguarding at a camp for foster children. “At age 66, I renewed the Red Cross lifeguard certificate I first got at Kenyon in 1964,” he recalls. “Now it is service organizations, trips to Florence, Italy, with daughter Hilary, and sunsets at the beach with the dog and a glass of wine.”

1967

The Rev. Dr. William C. Scar enjoys life on a little horse ranch in Aiken, South Carolina. “Wouldn’t live anywhere else now. Built a true age-in-place home, the third house I’ve had the privilege to design and build. I still maintain a small psychotherapy practice and volunteer in areas of professional development. After two years as a widower, I am about to wed a lovely horsewoman my age who shares my love of old muscle cars. She rescues horses, and we are about to build new stables with living quarters. My osteoarthritis prevents me from running marathons, but I do have new knees and shoulders and a few other things. Therefore I don’t travel a lot now, but I have lots of room for visitors.”

1967

Joseph E. Simon, Fernandina Beach, Florida, still lives on Amelia Island near Jacksonville while working online as a parttime consultant on quality assurance and protocol issues for the children’s hospital in Atlanta. “Thinking of a second career as a touring tennis pro,” he offers. “Recently pocketed $160 for winning a 75-and-over tennis tournament. Spent $2,000 to play the tournament!”

1967

Lee P. Van Voris, Ninety Six, South Carolina, keeps up outside activities including walking, golf, yard work and time with neighbors and family. “We survived several rounds of COVID infection and vaccine doses and are ‘over’ masks and vaccines and social distancing! Our family has grown to 10 grandchildren since 2020, and we have traveled to see the East and West coast families three to four times in the last two years.” Lee is “terribly disappointed” in the movement to replace the Kenyon team nicknames. “I cannot believe that a small minority of on-campus or close-to-campus people are driving this without first consulting the whole of the Kenyon alumni population to determine whether a majority agree that this change is warranted. I … always thought that Lords, at least, and even Ladies, were neutral and safe nicknames, with no risk to being offensive or incorrect to anyone. Little did I know, and how naive I was! I hope that everyone comes to their senses on this issue. There is no need for change. This is embarrassing and makes me not proud of my undergraduate alma mater.”

1968

William M. Northway, Frankfort, Michigan, calls his “a lucky life.” At the Eastern prep school Williston Academy, a coach and teacher named Raymond L. Brown ’59 encouraged him to look at Kenyon, “which turned out to be a perfect fit for me,” Bill writes. “I found my way into Michigan’s dental school and interned at their Center for Human Growth and Development, where I met Robert Moyers, who pointed me to the orthodontic program at the Université de Montréal. I opened a practice in St. Bruno, Quebec, and was a clinical instructor at McGill for six years.” Bill moved back to northern Michigan, opened a practice, joined the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontics and has published 19 articles and lectured all over the world. “After 45 years of having the best job on the face of the earth, I sold my practice in September 2019, three months before the first case of COVID19 was identified,” he concludes. “For nearly fifty years I had the pleasure of working with people, many of whom would cover their mouths when smiling or laughing but ended up flaunting their smiles. Finally, I am married to the girl of my dreams. Pretty lucky.”

1968

Jack D. Train, Burbank, California, wrote from The Lodge at Little St. Simons Island, Georgia, “a truly unspoiled barrier island closed to development but welcoming to lovers of birds and reptiles. Like many of my Kenyon friends, I love what the College and affiliated groups are doing to preserve and enhance nature and sustainability in Gambier and Knox County. Onward!”

1968

For several years now, including during ‘safer’ times of the pandemic, five Kenyon grads — all Kokosingers — have gathered to sing old and new arrangements for ourselves and occasionally for schools and healthcare facilities. James S. Hecox ’69, the very first Kokosingers musical director and arranger, Paul G. Keiner ’70, Eric B. Herr ’70, Jeffrey A. Walker ’74 and I have billed ourselves as the Kokes Klassics and gathered mostly at my centrally located home in Concord, New Hampshire. What a joy to create close harmonies again with such good friends from our Kenyon days! For whatever my opinion is worth, we don’t sound too bad!

1969

“It’s sobering to be this old! But hopefully also comes wisdom!? Still working part-time as a urologist. I’m not sure why, but I guess I still love seeing patients in the office. I miss my old friends at Kenyon and hope all are well.”

Robert G. Fugitt, Getzville, New York

1969

Peter D. Lawrason, Fairbanks, Alaska, continues working as a full-time OBGYN. “Addie, my youngest, is a freshman at Arizona State in the bachelor’s nursing program. Drew is studying at the University of Alaska while living in Naples, Florida. Older sons Brad and Alex (with twin high school grandchildren Kelly and Slater) live in New Jersey. My older daughter is a physician living in Durango, Colorado, with her 3 1/2-year-old daughter, Olivia, and husband, Josh.”

1970s

1970

Robert S. Berger, Buffalo, New York, reflected on his decade of lows and highs: “The lows have been the losses of many friends, including classmates, the most devastating being the 2012 death of my wife, Alice Kryzan. For highs, the births of grandchildren and a second chance at love with my marriage last October to my wonderful wife, Nitza Ellis.” Since retiring after 35 years teaching at the University at Buffalo Law School, Bob has served on the board
of the Girls Education Collaborative for eight years, chairing it for five. “We have helped the Immaculate Heart Sisters of Africa build and open a successful boarding school for girls in a remote area of Tanzania, and I have been able to travel there three times,” he informs.

1970

G. Christopher Blauvelt, Amherst, Massachusetts, is pleased to announce a sixth grandchild, Yusuf Blauvelt, born Aug. 10. A seventh was due in June. “Very blessed!”

1970

Donald L. Comis, Howard, Ohio, is busy planting trees and prairie plants and hoping to restart a volunteer Nature in the Valley column in the newsletter published by his housing association in Apple Valley, about five miles from Kenyon. “You never know where life’s going to take you! Two years after my wife’s death, I’m moving into routines, more writing, starting to write my life’s stories. A lifelong protester, I participate in a weekly protest/silent vigil in Mount Vernon led by a Kenyon professor. Kenyon has come a long way since the 1960s, when I was the lone antiwar protester one day in Mount Vernon!”

1970

Charles H. Matthewson, Tucson, Arizona, updates that in December he had the honor of being memorialized with his father at the Mt. Soledad National Veterans Memorial near San Diego — “a long way in time and space from the commissioning of Kenyon’s ‘last lieutenants’ at the Hill in 1970.”

1970

“I am holding up better than ever at an age I couldn’t have imagined to see 52 years ago. Over three consecutive journeys, I’ve hiked 1,200 miles on various routes of the Camino de Santiago across Spain and Portugal. Collectively, they were lifealtering experiences. I play tennis most days, trying to represent our generation against millennials and others. Mark S. Geston ’68 is a neighbor, and occasionally we run into each other walking our dogs. Currently in conversation with renowned classmate Murray L. Horwitz about an upcoming visit to Boise, where a theater company I have links to will be staging his hit creation, ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’’ That’s my motto, too.

Anthony W. Olbrich, Boise, Idaho

1970

“After Kenyon, medical school led me to the lifelong study of infectious diseases. Tropical medicine training in England led to a fellowship at Johns Hopkins, work in Panama, epidemiology work at the CDC, and then a move to Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, where I spent the next 20 years, most in vaccine development. Five of those years were in Thailand, another three in Peru. Cholera vaccine work eventually led to a large trial in Peru during a 1990s outbreak. When I retired in 2002, I returned to the public health school at Hopkins, then on to vaccine development for the biotech and pharmaceutical industry. Currently I’m the medical director for clinical research at Bozeman Health. My wife, Joanne, and I, living here for the past nine years, have always loved the mountains. The friendly community has been a perfect place for semiretirement. Both children live in California, one is married and we have one grandson. Life has been full of good memories, and new memories come with each new day.

David Taylor, Bozeman, Montana

1971

Belinda Bremner, Oak Park, Illinois, reports that her daughter was married in September and her son will be married in October. “Retired from teaching, busy with writing, theater and volunteer work. The Oak Park Festival Theatre, the Midwest’s oldest professional outdoor classical theater and my theater home, suffered a devastating fire in late November just after our last indoor production, and I have been busy fundraising to replace all the equipment we lost. Our friends have been beyond generous, and we are back this summer with ‘The Winter’s Tale.’”

1971

David A. Caplin, St. Louis, Missouri, informs that although it is “somewhat counterintuitive,” his plastic surgery practice has thrived during the pandemic. “Current plan is to continue practicing with a winddown over the next three to five years, transitioning from private practice to academic practice for the last few. I often think back to our years at Kenyon and the many friendships that made those years so special.”

1971

Philip H. Cass, Dublin, Ohio, defines semiretirement as “working only on things I want to work on.” For him, that’s the mindfulnessbased Physicians Leadership Academy he founded in 2014, he informs, comprising eight classes that have so far produced 133 meditating physicians. Other consulting work involves physician wellbeing or resolving conflicts within organizations. He and senior year roommate Sante Matteo meet at the Clifton Mill Gorge restaurant for breakfast a few times a year — “join us if you’d like.”

1971

Glenn W. Fritz, Chesapeake, Virginia, reports he is “lucky to be here” after contracting COVID19 in late 2020 before vaccines were available. “I was in rough shape for about a week. As you lie in bed, between shaking chills and redhot fever, you have a chance to think a lot about how you got here and how lucky your life has been. I never dreamed I would be so fortunate: a beautiful wife, four great children and seven grandchildren, all magnificently healthy. Kenyon College launched me on this beautiful journey. My professors, my coaches and above all my fellow classmates gave me the energy and knowledge to set my course to try to be the best I could.”

1971

Jack Killen, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, shares, “Undeterred by the pandemic, a flock of old peeps and assorted hangerson gathered at Sea Island, Georgia, last October. Epic weekend of dear friends sharing treasured — if sometimes hazy — memories of our amazing years on the Hill, and catching up on 50 years of life since we were last all together there. Present with me were Dan Pickens, Jan S. Ostrovsky, Peter Hoover, Ransom Griffin III, David T. Duff, Douglas M. Vogeler, James E. Breece III ’74, John M. Himmel ’73, Randolph Kent Harrison ’73 and many of their spouses.

1971

Sante Matteo, Oxford, Ohio, teaches film and lit courses for Miami University’s Institute for Learning in Retirement via WebEx, allowing people from all over the world to participate, “including my old roommate Philip H. Cass,” he shares. “He signed up for my film course last fall and my lit course on Italian lovers this spring, and Joseph Chu took a course about his beloved city of Paris.” Details on how to register are at miamioh.edu.

1971

Scott D. Miller, Pewaukee, Wisconsin, sold the consulting firm he founded in 1996, ESI Equity, to his partners in 2019. “Not quite done with the serial entrepreneur thing, my next chapter includes building a significant portfolio of directorships in ESOP (Employee Stock Ownership Plan) companies.” Scott serves on seven ESOP boards and is enjoying the seasons in Wisconsin, after he and his bride of 40plus years, Jayne Ayers, sold their horse farm and moved into “a blessedly low-maintenance condo” where they can “play with grandchildren and stay focused on the things most important to us.”

1971

Christopher A. Myers, Baltimore, a partner at the law firm Holland & Knight in the D.C. area for 25 years, and his wife, Christine, now approach their 45th wedding anniversary. “Of our three adult children, none are lawyers, although they are all great debaters. We recently moved to Baltimore to be closer to them and are planning a multigenerational household with daughter Caroline and youngest son Byron. We regularly see Jeffrey C. Franklin ’70 and his family and recently met with David W. Cronin ’73 and his wife. We are planning a trip to Asheville, North Carolina, to visit the Franklins and will see David Greenwood ’72 there.”

1971

Robert C. Patrick, Mugla, Turkey, shares that after a career teaching in independent schools, he and Martha took up multiyear positions at the American International School in Egypt and then the Taipei American School. “Overseas life was delightfully varied. As I reached retirement age, we decided to find a home abroad and help others experience the sense of international community we had come to love.” For 17 years, they have lived on Turkey’s Aegean coast, serving on the board of the Herodotus Academy of the Third Age. “I lead the group’s program of walks and hikes, Martha leads writing groups and handles administrative tasks, and we travel with friends to historic sites, enjoying the people, culture, mild climate and six Greek islands. Kenyon Professor Robert Bennett started me thinking about Turkish coasts during a fascinating classical civilization course.”

1972

Steve Zinder, Ithaca, New York, writes, “In 1974, I got a master’s in microbiology from Colorado State University, where I fell in love with the mountains and my wife, Chris. At the University of Wisconsin, I worked with Thomas D. Brock, famous for his work with thermophiles — including discovering the bug that makes the enzyme used for PCR reactions such as COVID tests — and completed my Ph.D. in bacteriology in 1977. On a postdoc at UCLA from ’77 to ’79, we were almost seduced by southern California living, but I spent more than 41 years as a microbiology professor at Cornell.” Steve specialized in microbial diversity and environmental microbiology. He retired July 1. “I’ve been still going in to work most days, trying to finish up some research and publications. I had a good run, and even got an honorary degree from Kenyon in 2014. I guess all that time in the lab as a chem major paid off.” Steve visited Richard B. Ripley in California and now plans to relocate to Portland, Oregon, where two sons live.

1973

Thomas E. Allen, Takoma Park, Maryland, is resurrecting his musical interests after 40 years working with the deaf. “I performed tenor — I can still manage a high note or two — in a concert performance of the Vivaldi Gloria, and I have sent my clarinet out to be refurbished. The ghost of Paul Schwartz lurks.”

1973

“I just called to say I love you! After a fouryear string of health problems, I am making a big comeback in 2022. I’m still working at 70, married to the same old guy (Clint). Mother of Nick, grandmother of Adara and Fiona. Every day, I feel lucky to be alive! First class of women forever! I wish I could teleport to Kenyon right now and hug every one of you!

K.D. Novak Burnett, Beaverton, Oregon

1973

Merrill Tomlinson Carinci, Queens Village, New York, updates, “I got COVID early on and survived unscathed — except for my taste buds. Then got the Omicron version and got through that easily. I deal with clients who, like most of us, are suffering from systemic trauma due to COVID. Working full time, seeing 25 to 40 a week in private practice as an LCSW. My personal solution to stress was to get a dog. Nova and I run through Alley Pond Park in Queens at 7 a.m. with a pack of people and up to 15 dogs (off leash) every day.” Merrill adds that her longterm interest in labyrinths led her to spearhead the construction of a 50-foot-diameter labyrinth on the grounds of Zion Episcopal Church. “All are welcome to come and walk it. The graveyard of the church is interesting, too, part of it dedicated to a native burial ground of the Matinecock, still an active tribe on Long Island.”

1973

“Peter and I are celebrating our 40th anniversary by saving yet another historic property in Lexington, Virginia. We preserved our first 39 years ago and can’t remember how many we’ve done since then. We swear this one will be our last! It’s a very special house. The couple who built it were free Blacks. After they emigrated to Liberia in 1850, the property became the home of one of Lexington’s earliest Jewish families. We look forward to seeing who owns it next!

Jean C. Dunbar

1973

Mitchell L. Jablons, Watchung, New Jersey, retired four years ago from his anesthesiology practice. “Life has been busy: another grandchild, tennis, exercise, skiing trips out West with my wife and parttime work as an anesthesiologist, which gave me a sense of purpose during the social isolation of the pandemic. Looking forward to the return to normalcy.”

1973

Kurt Karakul, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, retired as president and executive director of the Third Federal Foundation after 15 years. Kurt worked with the superintendent of Cleveland schools on an awardwinning Slavic Village educational program investing in young urban children from prebirth to graduation from college. He serves on the Kenyon Alumni Council, several nonprofit boards and a project mentoring fourth and fifthgrade students. He, wife Mary Beth and son Conner ’11 and Trudy V. Andrzejewski ’12 returned to the Hill recently, enjoying lunch at the V.I. with Thomas P. Stamp who, Kurt reports, “gave us a tour of the amazing new library and other campus improvements. I encourage you to visit campus to see them yourself.”

1973

David L. Landefeld, Lancaster, Ohio, retired as a judge on the Fairfield County Municipal Court on Dec. 31, 2021, after completing one sixyear term. With the Ohio Constitution preventing any judge past age 70 from beginning a new term, David “officially became ‘constitutionally senile’ and unable to run,” he jokes. “So we just returned from a month’s vacation in Hawaii celebrating my senility.”

1973

Ellen Pader, Northampton, Massachusetts, who taught at UMass, Amherst, for over 30 years as an anthropologist in regional planning and in public policy, is now “failing miserably” in her role as professor emerita, she jokes. “Since retiring in 2019, I’ve taught my favorite gen. ed. class on Zoom and in-person (masked), and started an academic editing side gig. Lets me enjoy my wooded view at home. My daughter, Dvora, recently graduated from UMass with a self-designed degree in equine facilitated therapeutics. The one positive about the forced isolation of COVID has been virtual cocktail hours with Kenyon friends.”

1973

“Missing those seminars on the Hill? I have been listening to Melvyn Bragg’s In Our Time podcast. Few are about anything in our time; a very wellprepared Bragg and three academics dig into some topic — the Song of Roland, the poetry of Thomas Hardy, the mind of Alan Turing — and every week is something new. He keeps his guests on their toes, and I’m hooked. Only one episode a week, but a backlog of 300 — almost like being at the best seminar you remember, but Bragg never calls on you!”

Jeff Parker, Boulder, Colorado

1973

David L. Roberts, Laurel, Maryland, recently published an article in Convergence, an online journal of the Mathematical Association of America. The article is titled
“Building a Book: HathiTrust, Ancestry. com, Serendipity, and Lifetime Interests.”

1974

“My wife and I have been in the same downtown lake house for 41 years,” he shares. “It’s been a great town to watch grow. In 2020 our only daughter, Emelyn, delighted us with the news that she was pregnant. Discovery of a massive lymphoma required immediate chemotherapy and triggered the birth of our beautiful healthy granddaughter, Olivia, 10 weeks prematurely. The chemo was long and brutal but thankfully effective. During her multiple treatments in New York City, we made many trips; it became clear to me that dentistry was getting in the way, so I retired last July. We were then free to help them during her recovery. We spent six weeks with them during their search for a nanny and look forward to visiting them more in Rowayton, Connecticut.

Thomas F. Northway, East Grand Rapids, Michigan

1974

The Rev. Marylen MartyGentile, River Forest, Illinois, submits her first ever class note on the approach of the 50th: “After spending 20+ years in parish ministry at a church in Oak Park, Illinois, I retired. My life now mostly consists of being a decent human — trying hard — and an excellent nana to three young boys, with some travel thrown in. COVID has refocused many of us, me included, on what matters in life — family, compassion for the world.”

1974

“After 20 years in banking and 20 years as an independent bookstore owner, I have retired. Hope to spend more time with my family and read all the books I have put on my retirement bookcase over the years. I have one grandchild and look forward to more.”

Elizabeth R. Schram, Cincinnati

1974

Peter Smagorinsky, Athens, Georgia, updates that his 2020 book, “Learning to Teach English and Language Arts: A Vygotskian Perspective on Beginning Teachers’ Pedagogical Concept Development,” has been awarded the American Educational Research Association’s 2022 Exemplary Research in Teaching and Teacher Education Award.

1974

Jeffrey A. Walker, Lexington, Massachusetts, sings with the Kokes Klassics — James S. Hecox ’69, Eric B. Herr ’70, Paul G. Keiner ’70 and Timothy J. Wildman ’68 — performing at schools and assisted-living facilities in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. “We had a little hiatus due to the Omicron variant but performed again this spring. Karen Handel Walker ’77 and I enjoy taking care of our twin 4-yea-rold grandsons in nearby Somerville and visiting our 2 and 4year grandsons in Montreal, where our son’s family lives.”

1975

Teresa G. Betts, Solon, Ohio, celebrates her 47th wedding anniversary with Bill this year. “I am retired from teaching,” she updates, “but keep busy teaching online cooking history classes for seniors through BaldwinWallace College’s Institute for Learning in Retirement, and creating church banners for my business.”

1975

Michael C. Kulwicki, Troy, Michigan, has found his “retirement groove” teaching ESL and American culture to expatriate auto executives and Syrian and Afghan refugees, he informs. “I’m also a docent at the Arab American National Museum. COVID has curtailed my travel, but I’ve spent time in Florida during the pandemic. Had the chance to visit with Marian S. Block in January. Grateful that I live near and can spend time with my two grandchildren.”

1975

Kevin J. Martin, Glendale, California, sings, “Time keeps on slipping / Into the future. Here we are, facing 70 and happy to still be here.” Kevin is “happily employed” by Thomas A. Lucas’ video streaming venture, MagellanTV: “I tried retirement but it didn’t take, and now I write articles (magellantv. com) for readers’ amusement and my own. I’m especially happy with my recent essays on artists Renoir, Warhol and da Vinci.”

1975

“Daughter Rebecca is a performer, choreographer and teacher of Irish dance in the Boston area. My career in speech production research and the related acoustics and air flow ended about eight years ago. I had a brief career teaching mathematics in community colleges near Yuma, Arizona, and El Centro, California, sometimes right on the Mexican border and on a Marine base. That has been mixed with political campaigning in Ohio, California and Arizona. I am now writing my third book on the mathematical physics applied to phonetics. We travel to the Kingston, Ontario, area in the summers, and I often drive a beeline to the Southwest in the winter.

Richard S. McGowan, Lexington, Massachusetts

1976

Fran Abby Kurtis, West Orange, New Jersey, met with Joanie Schaffner and Gillian Teweles Denavit at MoMA for a quick visit. “Gillian was in from Paris, and Joanie came down from her home outside of Boston, while I came in from New Jersey. Lots of catching up!”

1976

“Still in the workforce … I’ve been a medical science liaison with pharma company MorphoSys a little over two years. The pandemic hit our family pretty hard, as I lost my mother in April 2020 and my husband, Peter Hudson, on March 29, 2021, to COVID19, as well as several friends. Still living in and loving Seattle, despite the rain.

Anne L. (Zilbersher) Sherwood, Shoreline, Washington

1976

“Having worked in college admissions for 12 years, six of them at Kenyon, I looked forward to our son’s college search with a bit of nostalgia for how that process used to work. ... We looked at schools in seven states, and he was admitted to every college to which he applied. Despite a little prodding on my part to choose a Midwestern college, he picked Dominican, a university in California he found entirely on his own. Wonderful to remember those days in Ransom Hall through our son’s quest and decision.”

Kim M. Straus, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1977

“Greetings from Palestine. In the hope of making a contribution to higher education for Palestinians, I took a leave from Brown University to become president of Birzeit University near Ramallah: an intense but inspiring challenge. Wish I could beam over to Middle Path for a leisurely stroll with some of my classmates.

Beshara B. Doumani, West Bank, Palestine

1977

Kim Effron, Brattleboro, Vermont, teaches from home students of all ages who have dyslexia and language-based differences.

1977

Marna Herrity, Brooklyn, New York, has taught at middle school, high school, college and graduate school for the past 42 years. Many of her former students have attended Kenyon, and she loves hearing about their experiences on the Hill. She looked forward to seeing classmates at the May reunion, as well as her Quaker friend James D. Morgan ’57 and nephew Stewart H. Kerns ’07.

1978

“Retirement is fun! Living full time in Vail now. Went back to Columbus this September and got to see Timothy G. Glasser ’80, Timothy M. Bridgham ’79, and Coach Steen and Marcie! Skied Steamboat this winter with James F. Parker ’81 and Susan (Jones) Oakes’ 81. Met an alum, Theodore C. Taggart ’91, on the tennis courts this summer … new tennis and ski buddy!

Christopher D. Barr, Vail, Colorado

1978

“Blessed to have my son-in-law as a partner and my daughter and grandkids in the same community. Honored to have held national leadership positions for the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer, leading to numerous articles and speaking engagements nationally and abroad. I constantly reflect on my years at Kenyon and consider the profound effect the experience and the people had on my attitudes, goals and life aspirations. I left the Hill forever changed in the best way possible.

Michael D. Sarap, Cambridge, Ohio

1979

Elizabeth Mueller Gross and Thomas S. Gross, Washington, D.C., are grandparents. Simon Slade Alushin was born in November to daughter Emma and her husband. “Simon is perfectly wonderful,” they submit.

1979

“In February I performed the role of Babs (exactly my age) in the play ‘Life Sucks,’ by Aaron Posner, which is ‘sort of adapted from Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov,’ according to the play-script cover and poster. Perfect title for our times! ... This is at Heartland Theatre in central Illinois, where Scott Klavan once visited as the judge in a play contest!”

Kathleen V. Kirk, Normal, Illinois

1979

“After a life and career in Manhattan, I returned to the South with my husband in 2001. We’ve raised two swamp babies who are almost fully launched: one pursuing music in L.A. and the other stepping into event management in Boca. Now, I’m deep into a successful career designing playgrounds, happy as a clam and savoring life as a late bloomer.”

Stacy F. Moseley, Jacksonville, Florida

1980s

1980

“In 2016, I was working as an independent business consultant, supporting mostly professional service firms. Almost exactly two weeks after my high school 40th reunion, where we talked about transitions, a business contact called me to ask, ‘How do you feel about medical marijuana?’ So for nearly six years now I’ve been building and running cannabis businesses in New England. My newest employer is planning a more national approach, so my vision will expand as well. Two grown sons, one building a novel fin-tech app called Eco, and the other learning the fine art of cannabis cultivation. Life’s pretty simple. Looking forward to hanging out again with Roger O. Fillion at industry conferences!”

Jeremy Bromberg, Lincoln, Massachusetts

1980

“Now retired from teaching and soon to be a grandmother, I had the enormous, if peculiar, blessing of spending an entire autumn and winter in Ohio with my 92-year-old parents and my son Andrés E. Millan ’07. Medical treatment for breast cancer was interspersed with trips to nature reserves, parks, arboretums, gardens, bogs and beaches, in autumn and again under snow. The Cleveland Museum of Art was a nearly daily treat, with ensuing discussions, internet searches and podcasts about ancient civilizations. We’ve shared explorations of jazz, observations of the social structures of Wooster, and analyses of love, forgiveness and family. Late-night conversations, casual chats and easy hanging out among the four of us were unexpected treats. Oh, and the cancer treatment seems to have been successful, too!”

Virginia Calhoun de Millan, San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico

1980

“After five years as associate dean, I am returning to teaching, research and global education. I will be directing Drew’s London semester in the fall and a dreamed-of research sabbatical in the spring, including (we hope) a chance to get back to our research station in Ecuador. The pandemic has been brutal there, but friends and colleagues have come through. Would love to connect with any of our class in England!

Maria A. Masucci, Berkeley Heights, New Jersey

1980

Lisa D. Schott, Mount Vernon, Ohio, looked forward to a June retirement after 37 years working for Kenyon. “My past 12 years with Philander Chase Conservancy and creating Kokosing Nature Preserve have been especially rewarding,” she notes. “The Conservancy, which has helped to conserve almost 6,000 acres in a five-mile radius of Kenyon, was awarded national accreditation by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission in February. Our two sons and their families live in Columbus, so we will have more time with them and to enjoy our granddaughters, ages 1 and 2.”

1981

“After 40 years in the classroom, I’ve retired from teaching high school social studies. It’s nice to still be coaching tennis. With more time for travel, family, biking and reading, I’m loving retirement!”

Kerry Hall, Wilmette, Illinois

1981

Susan J. Hudson, Medina, Ohio, and her wife spent winter holidays with their daughter Cassandra “Cassie” K. HudsonHeck ’19 — while fighting COVID. “It just gave us more time together,” Sue writes. She directs two programs in women’s health at the Cleveland Clinic.

1982

“Forty years? Really. Incredible — I find myself 62 years old and a grandmother! I consider myself very lucky and blessed. My four kids are all over the country — Arizona, Kansas, New York and Virginia. Still in real estate, 22 years now, and have my own flower-arranging business, Petal Pushers. I would love to retire but not in the cards just yet. Fallen in love with pickle-ball and play it as much as I can. My motto is move while I can!

Frances H. “Corky” (Hood) Hebert, Lutherville, Maryland,

1982

Stephen F. Hale said farewell to St. Louis after 30 years at the St. Louis Brewery, home of Schlafly Beer, he updates. “Time to head back to New England and then move onto our new 44foot catamaran as a permanent home. Sara and I are picking up the boat in Buenos Aires in September, planning to get to Maine the following summer, and we hope to see many of you along the way! Follow our travels at sailwiththehales.com.”

1982

“Time spent at Kenyon has remained a sweet spot in my memory! Four healthy grandkids whom we love — I hope one might land at Kenyon. I became director of integrative health at Ohio State this year, and it has been a wild ride. Our mindfulness program (mindfulnessinmotion.osu.edu) has been adopted by hospital systems/organizations all the way to the West Coast. The reductions in burnout and stress speak for themselves, but the research data is what people want. I especially love seeing college freshmen breathe easier, along with the healthcare professionals who have risked their own wellness over the pandemic.

Maryanna (Danis) Klatt, Columbus, Ohio

1982

James C. NicholsFleming, West Berlin, Vermont, took advantage of an early retirement offer from his school district last spring. “I am enjoying a more flexible schedule,” he reports, “but it took some adjustment. I am volunteering as a guardian ad litem for children in state custody, as well as subbing a few days here or there at my former school. Not too much down time, but enough to walk more frequently, keep up with the local newspaper and do more home cooking.”

1982

Julie E. Berman, Savannah, Georgia, received her Global TESOL certificate at the end of 2021 and began teaching ESL classes at Savannah Technical College.

1982

“I tentatively embraced the 21st century via purchases of a recently made car and a recently made phone. Apparently those items go together now, like a new overcoat and galoshes.”

Bill Edwards, Anniston, Alabama

1983

“Last year I threw off the black robe, bought a gigantic hammer drill and began making sculptures from reclaimed granite, concrete and rusty bits of iron.”

Beth A. Crawford, Haydenville, Massachusetts

1983

Amy McCloskey, Brooklyn, New York, updates that although she has had some demanding jobs, she’s never worked harder than she did reopening her bar, Madame X, after being closed for 16 months: “Between having to replace nearly my entire staff to dealing with guests who seem to have reacted to shutdown uncertainty by needing to micromanage every detail, it’s been a real roller coaster. Still, NYC nightlife appears to be coming back strong. In some ways it reminds me of what it was like when I first started going out here. Eat, drink and be merry, folks, because who knows what tomorrow will bring? Hoping to divest myself of enough of the day-to-day to visit Gwen A. Kreager, Ellen Leerburger ’86, Jocelyn B. Hardman ’87 and Joanna E. “Nona” Rubin ’84 this summer!”

1983

Nancy R. Powers, Gambier, Ohio, was in Utah for a niece’s wedding when she and her brother, in a Kenyon T-shirt, were walking down an alley. “When a car pulled out, two people, seeing the T-shirt, rolled down the window and asked if we were from Ohio. They were Laura Read Wood ’82 and her husband, Anthony W. Wood ’82, on vacation. Laurie and I played on the women’s club soccer team together for three years! We all went out to dinner and had a lovely time catching up.”

1983

“2021 was an awesome year for me and my family. My middle daughter got married in the same Rhode Island seaside chapel where I was married 32 years earlier. My son got engaged and will be married this fall. My other daughter got a nice promotion and a new place in Boston. My kids really had a stellar year in adulthood! My new company, Greenfield Media LLC, executive-produced three films last year, and we have five lined up for 2022. I am making modest-budget action films with well-known marketable cast.

William S. Sondheim, Fairfield, Connecticut

1984

Elizabeth A. Dellinger, University Heights, Ohio, serves as general counsel and senior vice president for Park Place Technologies. Betsy has two sons, 18 and 19, and stays in touch almost daily with Kenyon friends.

1984

Amy R. McKune and Kenneth E. Moncrieff ’85 moved into a new home in Kansas City, Missouri, in May 2021. “We have been lovingly renovating it to recapture its midcentury charm,” she updates. “We were wed four days later with a very small group of close friends in attendance. Several friends and family joined us via Zoom, including my father, John E. McKune ’52.”

1984

Candace M. OwenWilliams, Locust Valley, New York, won the Woodridge Award for Great Teachers, which was presented by her former student, Broadway playwright Jeremy O. Harris on May 9, National Teacher Day. Harris wrote “Slave Play,” the most Tony-nominated play ever. Jeremy also invited Candace to the Tonys, and she walked the red carpet with him.

1984

“When I studied at Kenyon, my dad was on Social Security and my mom worked as a technical editor. Kenyon provided me generous grants and a small loan at 3 percent interest. From today’s vantage point, I can see how privileged I was to get an excellent B.A. with practically no debt, then to go on to get three graduate degrees, also with enough assistance to finish without debt. But 1980–84 was also a time when it took a lot less generosity for working-class kids to receive a high-quality college education. Where I teach now, at the University of Illinois, instate tuition as of 1980 cost $2,000 in today’s dollars. Now it’s over $12K. Out-of-state, it’s nearly $30K. So I spend a lot of time thinking — in a field, city planning, where the default practice credential is now a two-year master’s degree — about how to build pathways from high school to community college to four-year degrees and careers for the many young adults who aspire to change the world but can’t manage even an affordable liberal arts B.A.

Rolf J. Pendall, Champaign, Illinois

1985

“The scene: 1. Knowing my ‘baby’ would be graduating from college in May; 2. Not knowing when and if we’d be able to take the next family vacation; and 3. Wanting to stay in the country during COVID. Who you gonna call? Classmate Jan M. Richardson, travel agent extraordinaire and Disney aficionada! Jan helped us plan the best trip to the Magic Kingdom just before Christmas. It’s certainly a different trip to Disney when traveling with over-20-yearold boys, as opposed to when they were school age. This time they couldn’t wait to ‘drink around the world’ at Epcot. And they were up for all the rides — which couldn’t be said for their father!”

Emily M. Resnik Conn, Woodbridge, Connecticut

1985

Kristen Moloney Farmer lives in her hometown, Metamora, Michigan, working as a professional photographer for the last 20 years. “But I am taking a hiatus right now,” she shares, “to manage my son’s band, Frame 42. It has been a trip! They just got back from a national tour. Yes, I traveled in a tour bus for three weeks with 10 other people. All worth it, because I got to see Susan B. Berger, Megan O’Donnell Patton ’84 and Leslie Ross Choma ’84 in Ohio. I spend the rest of my time getting pushed, pulled, jumped on and hugged by my three beautiful grandchildren.”

1985

Jan M. Richardson, Ridgeland, Mississippi, joined the Keep Mississippi Beautiful office as assistant director in November 2021. “I was honored to receive the Madison County School District High School Parent of the Year award for the 202122 school year” she updates.

1985

Josh Welsh, Glendale, California, continues to work in the independent film world as president of Film Independent and to record music under the moniker of Meatyard. Last year, he was excited to see his nephew Liam W. Brodigan ’19 in California.

1986

Margaret S. Callesen, Avon Lake, Ohio, reports spending a wonderful early November weekend in Chicago with Christine B. Melone, Jill A. Kalish, Jennifer A. Cohan and Megan Coleman. “It was fabulous to just connect, relax and enjoy the company of lifelong friends. Bonus was a lunch with Pamela L. Kalish ’89!”

1986

“My husband, our partners and I are entering our fourth year of owning the Montrose Saloon, a live music venue featuring roots-based folk, experimental, pop, rock, jazz, soul, punk and country music, with a large outdoor beer garden in the Albany Park neighborhood. Starting a business the year before a pandemic presented many challenges, needless to say, but we’re still here and immensely grateful for it. We’ve had a number of bands consisting of younger Kenyon alumni, a few of the touring Kenyon a capella groups and the PartTime Lovers — an ’80s cover band featuring a couple of Kenyon alums — perform at our club, along with numerous local and touring acts.”

Katherine Drake Chial, Chicago

1986

Charles E. McClellan and his wife, Sharon, and their three children live in Dubai, U.A.E., where he is assigned to the U.S. consulate general as chief of
the American citizens services section. “It’s hot here in the Gulf! Despite the challenges brought on by COVID, we’re enjoying the
‘superlatives’ Dubai has to offer: the highest Ferris wheel. the tallest building. the longest zip line. the biggest indoor aquarium. the largest (and most painfully crowded) shopping mall. It’s all here! We’ll see where this Foreign Service adventure takes us next!”

1986

Maura S. Minsky, Brooklyn, New York, reports that her family was matched with a Ukrainian family of eight who moved to Brooklyn. “My head is swimming, thinking of all they must navigate in a new country with a new language while their home is being destroyed. There’s not much for us to do but be present for them. The same week I lost a friend to aggressive lung cancer. We hadn’t been in touch for years, but in his death he reunited a group of friends who met in our 20s and became a family — a family I didn’t know I needed so much right now. I’m director of the Empathy Project at NYU School of Medicine, where we use media, technology and research to train a new generation of clinicians to value and to practice empathy. If what you’re doing intersects with empathy, drop me a line at maura.minsky@ nyulangone.org. I’d love to hear how you’re thinking about empathy and find ways to enrich one another’s work.”

1987

“Hello from sunny San Diego! I moved here from Santa Monica two years ago, and last September I got married to Jennifer Ouellette, who grew up in Maine 30 minutes away from me in Manchester, Massachusetts. I still manage Semper Fuel LLC. Have taken on a new endeavor as a house painter with a small existing company owned by a good friend of mine and will become owner by the end of 2022.

Charles C. Adams IV

1987

Genevieve C. Bates married Marshall Garrison ’86. “We met at Kenyon 37 years ago when we both lived in Watson, and he charmed me with his smile and his awesome ’80s hairstyle.”

1987

“Lab work isn’t easily done from home. The same goes for my husband, a master technician in automotive repair — he also kept going in to work. My son finished his OSU master’s in mechanical engineering in 2020. In early 2021, my father, Thomas M. Jenkins ’57, was found to have liver cancer, and I spent the better part of the year as his primary caregiver. His passing has left an odd vacancy in my routines. Caring for our loved ones is such a blessing as well as a stressful challenge.

Elizabeth (Jenkins) Erb, Loveland, Ohio

1987

After graduation, M. Rebecca Kilburn earned her economics Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and became an economist at the RAND Corp. for 28 years before transitioning to a research professor position at the Prevention Research Center in the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Living in Santa Fe for 17 years — more than 1,500 miles from Gambier and with fewer than 100,000 residents — she finds it remarkable to connect with Kenyon so often: “Close local friends are Kenyon alums, my children have teachers who went to Kenyon, colleagues graduated from Kenyon and so on. I also regularly host Kenyon friends in Santa Fe — Beth (Welty) Dreyfuss visited last week.”

1987

“I am living my same wonderful rural life. My husband is a farm vet, I am a small-animal vet, and we have a flock of 100plus sheep that keep us busy when we’re not working. Our son graduated from South Dakota State University and now teaches high school animal science and agriculture. One daughter is at Lafayette College in eastern Pennsylvania and one daughter is at Grinnell College in Iowa, so we went two for three on small private liberal arts colleges. Both girls are admissions tour guides (I was a tour guide for three years at Kenyon). Since their schools are both very similar to Kenyon, they’re always excited to tell me when they’ve had a family on tour who has also visited Gambier!

Lisa Sell, St. Michael, Minnesota

1988

Justin Lee, Berkeley, California, works for a tech company that uses virtual reality to treat stroke patients. “They actually have a blast doing therapy with penguins in VR pinball worlds!” he reports. “My daughter, Marnie, is in her third year at UC Davis, and my wife, Sheryl, is a licensed architect who does a lot of home-hardening consultation for wildfires. I still train youth crosscountry and track; one of my former runners just won a California state high school championship!”

1988

Matthew C. Pasher, New York City, works remotely supporting users of the Quickbooks product suite. Daughter Naomi is a seventh-grader at the Professional Performing Arts School in the theater district. “It’s a tremendous challenge being a parent to a tween,” he observes, “so any offers of support or a shoulder to cry on are appreciated. I am really enjoying reconnecting with lots of Kenyon people through our K’80s website and have started a weekly call on Sunday nights with a wonderful group. Recently caught up with Sabrina Barr Kotzen and have had great help procuring hardtoaccess books through Michael K. Zorek ’82, who works at a wonderful bookstore in the city.”

1988

“The A3 girls took advantage of Patricia Rossman Skrha’s exciting news and gathered for a pre-wedding celebration. Congratulations, Pattie and George. In other news, our daughter Tia is now a certified sommelier if anyone needs some wine-pairing recommendations. Son Max weathered the cold as a University of Rochester sophomore.”

Lauren (Ewers) Polite, Chicago

1988

“I am helping a local museum divest itself of a bunch of vintage typewriters. Totally coincidentally, my manual typewriter collection has recently expanded. My sentimental favorite remains the 1949 Underwood Leader I used to write my senior thesis at Kenyon. It still has a cartoon from 1985 taped to the front.”

Paul Singer, Boston

1988

Thomas C. Richardson, Mattapoisett, Massachusetts, has been producing season three of his out-door-adventure/destination show “Explore New England,” which airs on a regional TV network (NESN), as well as on Roku and YouTube. “It has been an interesting journey from editing and writing for print magazines to the film and TV world, but the theme of trying to tell interesting stories remains the same. Plus, it’s a lot of fun and way better than a desk job!” Last summer, Tom spent a Florida weekend catching up with Nina L. Oldenquist, Sarah (Fox) Call, Lori S. (Hewitt) Harrison, Joseph H. Shrum, Thomas A. Gallucio, E. Douglas Thompson Jr. and Donald M. Dowd III. “We had a blast,” he sums up, “although I’m pretty sure the phrase ‘I’m getting too old for this’ may have been uttered a few times.”

1988

“It’s fun to be a newlywed at age 55! And even better when your Kenyon roomies come to Cleveland to join the celebration. Great to see Laura Jill Tibbe, Lauren E. Polite, Susanna M. Brown, Susan Lind Quigley, Lynne A. Schneebeck, along with spouses Blase Polite and John A. Quigley ’89, and niece Kaitlin E. Rossman ’21.”

Patricia Rossman Skrha, Cleveland

1988

Shelley G. SwankAnderson and Kevin J. Anderson, Peoria, Illinois, celebrated reuniting with Bret Frye after eldest daughter Kiele L. Anderson ’21 moved to Marietta, Ohio, and got a checkup at Bret’s dental practice. Middle child Leah N. Anderson ’23, Kenyon women’s soccer goalkeeper, had a blast studying in Edinburgh. Shelley has been busy delivering Meals on Wheels this year. “Some elderly and shutins who count on the program for a daily hot meal are living in terrible circumstances in some cases and complete squalor in others. Support your own local programs to help the poor, disabled and shutins!”

1989

“As part of the national conversation about racial justice, law enforcement and community safety, I am using my political science, community organizing and nonprofit development background as the grant manager for an international NGO called Nonviolent Peaceforce. A new U.S. team focuses on combating police and community violence in Minneapolis and antiAsian violence in New York by providing skills and lessons learned from our work in the Global South. We can create grassroots responses that deescalate the violence and shift the responsibility to each of us to do what we can in our neighborhoods, nation and world. As part of this new adventure, we have gotten an apartment in Minneapolis and I am loving city life.

Tanya M. CharlickPaley

1989

Mollie A. Curry, Asheville, North Carolina, will break ground this year on her straw bale house. “It feels huge — exciting and scary at the same time,” she informs.
“We are acting as the contractors and plan to share our 25plus years of experience via workshops/apprenticeships along the way.”

1989

“This is my first Class Note, so I’ll cover the decades quickly. Immediately after leaving The Hill, I got my education master’s from John Carroll, started elementary teaching, got married, had three kids, then one more (at 42!). My kids are currently 25, 22, 21 and 13. I got divorced in 2013. I started my 32nd year of teaching this year (first grade), married the man of my dreams in Maui in July of 2022, and bought my first horse in April of 2022! Lots of dreams are coming true, and I’m currently happier and healthier than I’ve ever been.”

Erika D. Reiss, Canal Winchester, Ohio,

1989

“Jeanne and I are raising two teenagers in central Virginia. I have been doing political commentary for ABC, CBS and Fox affiliates as well as online news outlets while still chairing the University of Lynchburg political science and international relations and security studies programs.

David H. Richards, Amherst, Virginia

1989

“In the midst of the pandemic, three of my chaplain colleagues and I wrote a short book for hospital workers titled ‘Staff Care in the Midst of Traumatic Events’. The free ebook is at chaplaincyinnovation.org under resources/ebooks. The pandemic is winding down: On Fridays, I don’t feel like my brain is on fire.

Eric A. Williams, Indianapolis

1990s

1990

“I am grateful to Kenyon for many things, but none more than my best friend and the love of my life, Jessica Faith Becker Beamer ’92. We celebrate our 30th wedding anniversary in August!”

Dirk A. Beamer, Farmington, Michigan

1990

“After nine years in Los Angeles, Lincoln Bleveans ’89 and I are moving to NorCal. He took a job with Stanford, and we have been waiting until our youngest finishes high school to move. So we will be empty-nesters, and I will continue to work as a private writing instructor. Happily, the pandemic taught me and my students that we can do great work through the magic of Zoom and Google Docs, so I will be taking them all with me as we move to Half Moon Bay, California.”

Meredith Pastore Bleveans

1990

David E. Elliott is now artistic director of the historic Cape Playhouse in Dennis, Massachusetts. “It’s a rather magical place,” he informs,
“where luminaries such as Gertrude Lawrence, Gregory Peck and Henry Fonda once trod the boards of the beautiful 525seat theater — not to mention recent Tony winners, two of whom I booked for this summer! I was initially tasked with remounting the 2020 season, canceled due to the pandemic.” The 2022 season kicks off with ‘Grease,’ then ‘Private Lives,’ ‘Always … Patsy Cline,’ ‘God of Carnage,’ ‘An American in Paris,’ ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ and wraps up with
‘The Fantasticks’ (see capeplayhouse.com).

1990

“I am living the dream in Denver! Three kids aged 9, 10, and 13, and my wife and I are building an urban fruit tree orchard and vegetable farm. Lots of time devoted to Rotary, preparing to be district governor soon.”

James J. Johnston

1990

Anthony T. Kopyar, Dublin, Ohio, writes, “It’s funny how life can come full circle. Our family bought a house at Apple Valley Lake, where we spent considerable time the last two summers. Great timing with COVID taking away summer vacation opportunities. I frequently drive to Kenyon to get coffee (the KC is now a coffee house) and walk around campus. It looks the same, yet different.” Tony adds that Joseph C. Bline moved into his neighborhood, so they frequently run into each other at sporting events.

1990

Claire Lane marks 30 years since moving to Seattle. “For all its changes,” she writes, “I still love to call it home. But this past year I got to spend several months living ‘back home’ in Chicago. One of the best parts of that experience was seeing my dear Kenyon roommates Lara M. Moutsos and Ellen “Sam” Samberg. I even got to spend a day with Paul Singer ’88, who came from Boston to visit me — easier to do in Chicago than Seattle. I work on state and federal hunger policy, so I’ve just finished my second year lobbying Washington state’s legislature — and Congress — virtually. I won’t miss wearing masks, but I’d love to keep lobbying in jeans.”

1991

Whitney L. Balliett Jr., Woodbury, Connecticut, is a family therapist in a local school and in private practice. “I spend time hiking with my dogs every day and not enough time catching up with fellow alums,” Whit writes. “I have dreamy thoughts of Gambier, and so many memories. I remember owning a yellow and black (like a bumblebee) 1976 Datsun, with the key stuck in the ignition. One night a security and safety officer called me to retrieve it, driverside door open, idling on a hill on the other side of campus. The bandit didn’t know it wouldn’t go uphill sometimes.”

1991

Melanie Carlos, Silver Spring, Maryland, treasures precious memories of a mini-reunion with dear Kenyon girlfriends in Wisconsin thanks to the post-pandemic wedding of the eldest son of Chelsea M. Guillen and Christopher Guillen. “Staying busy at home with my ‘little dude’ who is not so little anymore — tenth grade! — taking him to cello lessons and crew practice,” she writes. “Recently I was appointed to the board of a growing nonprofit aimed at strengthening the educational outcomes of autistic students.”

1991

Andrew D. Keyt, Chicago, launched a new family-enterprise consulting firm with two of his closest colleagues last October. “The firm is off to an amazing start, with 10 consultants on three continents,” he reports.

1991

Stephanie R. Klein, Minneapolis, reports that, after six years with the University of Minnesota, she has returned to the private sector as principal consultant at Explorance. “Our purpose is helping clients gather meaningful data, understand it and apply the resulting insights to institutional improvements,” she writes. “My role will allow me to continue supporting the higher education community — just from a slightly different angle. Like many others, I’ve been working remotely the last two years. That will continue, albeit with a lot more time zones involved.”

1992

Sara Joyce Corley and Stephen J. Corley, Bellevue, Washington, spent winter break visiting their two daughters, Eleanor P. “Nell” Corley ’25 at Kenyon, and Margaret at Davidson. “Nell was one of the Kenyon first-years who had an incredible first semester in Copenhagen,” they write. “She is finally in Gambier. We rallied 12 of our friends to join us at the 30th Reunion this May!”

1992

Julia T. Flotten, Duluth, Minnesota, is an oncology R.N., having switched from outdoor education to nursing 14 years ago. “My wife, Alison, and our 11 and 17-year-old explore the Minnesota woods and lakes and trails as often as possible. With our son at a school in Utah this year, we’ve been learning a whole new ecosystem. As usual, Duluth is a great place to visit — our door is always open! Well, not literally, when it’s –25F!”

1992

“It’s been a strange couple of years navigating quarantine as performing musicians. My wife, Anna Steinhoff — cellist and Oberlin alumna — and I have had the amazing distraction of our son Eli, 3, to guide us through. I collaborated with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on a video project for kids, did a bunch of streaming events — it’s really fun to perform to no one in your basement! — and worked on new material. I have a new kids’ album coming out this year called ‘Space Cadet’, featuring bandmate Liam Davis ’90, and a new picture book called ‘I’ll Be Your Polar Bear’ that will be released by Putnam in October.

Justin S. Roberts, Evanston, Illinois

1993

“I finally dipped my toe into the waters of publishing with the release of my new paranormal romance series, California Demigods. Curious classmates interested in a racy romantic romp with gods and goddesses are encouraged to check out my author website at hepayton.com.”

Hilary E. Bunlert, Oakland, California

1993

Trish (Segal) Piliado moved from the Pacific Northwest back to Ohio, one county west of Knox, in November after 22 years away. “Was super-excited to reconnect with Randy L. Rock, Amy L. McLanahan and Jennifer A. Carter,” Trish writes. “I bought my dream horse farm in the small town of Marengo, 30 minutes north of Columbus and 30 minutes from Kenyon! I also have a guest suite I rent out through Airbnb, so if you need a place to stay near Kenyon, keep me in mind. I took a new job with Columbus City Schools as the supervisor of social-emotional and student support services and am excited to be back in the Midwest.”

1993

“My oldest, Sofia, is halfway through her Ph.D. in physical therapy; my youngest, Natalie, graduated from Butler in May and starts her master’s to become a physician’s assistant. So proud of both of them studying to help others in the medical field. I’m finishing my 16th year in education and eighth year as a literacy specialist. Rod H. Simpson ’91 and I are having fun with our RV, visiting national parks.”

Laura G. Simpson, Galena, Ohio

1993

Maryann P. Surrick became general counsel of The Sentry, an investigative and policy NGO cofounded by George Clooney and John Prendergast that works to combat genocide by shutting out war criminals, kleptocrats and transnational war profiteers from the international financial system. “I still live in Washington, D.C., next door to Ann Miller Kaye, with my husband, Scott; our two boys, Ben (almost 15) and Will (12); our Labrador, Chloe; and our free-range house bunny, Bartleby,” she writes.

1994

“While many of you are contemplating your kids going to or even graduating from college, I’m just getting started. My wife and I were blessed with our second child, a little girl, in midFebruary. She and her big brother, who turned 3 in early March, are doing well together, but let’s see what happens when she’s interested in playing with his firetrucks. I’ve been taking parenting advice from Julian L. Boxenbaum, Nathaniel P. “Nate” Nonoy and Corey A. Goldsand, and I welcome additional thoughts from any parents who can remember having little kids around the house.

Christopher G. Calvosa, Bronx, New York

1994

James K. Feuer, Alhambra, California, just aired his first recurring TV role on “A Good Cop” and is looking to meet with industry alumni in Los Angeles.

1994

“After leaving the legal field during the pandemic, I now work at an independent used bookstore in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. We have an online presence, so our used books can be found on sites such as Biblio. com and Alibris.com. I’ve been thrilled to fill orders for customers in Gambier! I hope the little notes I’ve enclosed have made each recipient’s day!

Amy (Katz) Leaman, Pittsburgh

1994

“In September, I married my best friend and the love of my life, Kristen Holmstrand, in our hometown of Plymouth, Massachusetts. Many of our friends — including Jason A. Creux, Katy J. Dettinger, Stephanie L. Hartman, Bradley M. Hersh and Loren R. Lease — witnessed via livestream as we exchanged rings and read to each other from ‘David Copperfield’.”

Robert T. Rogers, Robert T. Rogers

1994

“I love seeing how Kenyon has evolved since graduation, and I’m eternally grateful for all I learned along Middle Path. I would not be a working artist were it not for the broad, creative and mindful education I received from professors Gregory Spaid ’68, Melissa Dabakis and Mort Guiney, among so many others. Throughout COVID I’ve been hunkering down in my hometown of NYC with my husband and 10-year-old son. Very grateful to be working as an artist and photographer with clients as diverse as Architectural Digest, Weight Watchers and The Sunday Times of London Style Magazine.

Alexandra Rowley, New York

1994

“I am living happily in the Hudson Valley with my husband, Jack, a writer and teacher. Being from Gotham, I never expected to end up in the sticks. It felt like ‘The Shining’ when I got here, but quickly turned into a ‘Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood’ dream. A couple of years ago I cofounded an organization called Partners for Climate Action Hudson Valley (climateactionhv.org). I co-direct a program that supports municipal leaders through the nuts and bolts of transitioning to sustainable and regenerative practices. It’s a joy to be in close touch with Ronald W. Rittinger, Darnell P. Heywood and Alexander D. Fox.

Paige R. Ruane, Ghent, New York

1995

Jennifer Anderson Marcellana, Columbus, Ohio, is in her 16th year teaching in Kenyon’s music department. “During the past couple years, this included teaching students to sing via Zoom,” she reports, “and teaching students to sing while wearing masks! It continues to be a wild but very rewarding ride!” Daughter Mia is a firstyear premed at OSU, and son Leo is in high school, where his soccer team recently won a state championship.

1995

Emma (Mead) Melo’s son Raphael A. Melo ’25 started his first year at Kenyon last fall, she reports. At her home in Louisville, Kentucky, “College acceptances have started rolling in for our daughter Olivia,” she writes, “which means next fall the house will be empty for the first time in 20 years. Lots more time to devote to work and projects — and a whole lot less time in Costco and carpool!”

1995

Jill E. Pollack, Silver Spring, Maryland, received a “pretty big promotion at the Department of Commerce,” she informs, “and I now lead a team of about 20 people, some of whom I’ve never met in person,” to collaborate on trade enforcement. “I have a new appreciation for local newscasters and others who work onscreen.” To her classmates who work as teachers or in education, she offers, “Thank you from the bottom of my heart for all you’ve done over the last two years. I hope as a society we can bring you the appreciation and respect you deserve.”

1995

Lynne (Jarvela) C.J. Sommer, Aurora, Colorado, shares memories of “slip-sliding down an icy Middle Path to class” and adds, “time for a second-generation layer: My daughter Elyse R. Sommer ’25 is reliving a few of my memories while she creates some of her own. Getting to class in February is nearly an Olympic sport. Was that a frontside 360 tail grab? Meanwhile, I continue to enjoy 300 days of Colorado sunshine.”

1996

Catherine L. Broadhead, Palm Beach Shores, Florida, is working hard at her company, NeoHear.com, which serves the d/Deaf and hard of hearing as well as hearing allies. “I am planning on changing it to a nonprofit in the future, and I encourage any alumni who are d/Deaf or HOH to reach out if they are interested in being involved.”

1996

“After 18 years with Young Presidents’ Organization and a short five-month summer sabbatical, I joined TIGER 21, a network of ultra-high-net-worth individuals based in NYC, as vice president of programming. That change has allowed me to spend more time on other activities I am passionate about: I led a summer leadership forum at the JFK Presidential Library in Boston, consulted on learning strategy for 50/50 Women on Boards, and advised on strategy for a nonprofit startup, the Knowledge Pledge. Excited to be traveling again — including a girls trip with Laura Wessel Cornely and connecting for coffee in San Francisco with Gillian Kneass. My kids are now both in high school, and I can’t believe we’ll start college tours next year!

Lisa Cafferata, Watertown, Massachusetts

1996

Pia V. Catton, New York City, is director of development at Battery Dance, a contemporary dance company. “Every August, we host an outdoor dance festival in Lower Manhattan — come see!” she invites. “The company is known for its storytelling and community-building workshop, Dancing to Connect, which has been shared in more than 60 countries, often in places where people are dealing with trauma or dislocation. In July, we’ll be in Houston working with recent immigrants from Afghanistan.”

1996

“I am back in the theater once again, trying out my acting chops. We are doing an adaptation of ‘La Cage Aux Folles’. While my wig is a little itchy when I’m sweaty, I love the feel of the heels as I dance and prance through the show!”

John A. Koepke, Vernon Hills, Illinois

1996

Steven C. Radak and Amanda S. (Carter) Radak ’98, Kent, Washington, celebrated 24 years of marriage in April. “We survived the COVID years in pretty good shape. My company embraced remote work, so I now happily work from home with my wife. We discovered we still like each other even being together for so much more of the day. Still working on getting to the empty-nest stage. The elder spawn is working her way toward a degree in automotive tech and moving in with her spouse. The younger was a ‘lucky’ high school graduate of COVID and is still trying to figure out what he wants to do next.”

1996

Brandie (Mayes) Wagner, Cortland, Ohio, celebrated 25 years working for Stellantis (Chrysler). “I remember leaving Gambier right after graduation and starting an internship with Chrysler the very next day,” she recalls. “My son Miles is all grown up with a real job, and Clo, a high school sophomore, keeps me busy with all of her dance, drama and Girl Scout events. I’ve been their Girl Scout leader for the past 11 years and am proud that I have been a Scout for 41 years. I recently joined the board of the Fine Arts Council of my county and hope to continue bringing the arts to young people. I love taking teenagers to gallery openings and plays."

1997

Jeremy R. Collins moved to Cincinnati and started working as the senior network administrator at Shepherd Material Sciences. “My partner has started working at TriHealth as a laborist, and we are currently looking for a house,” Jeremy updates. “We currently live downtown and enjoyed the Bengals’ playoff run. We are within walking distance of the stadium and enjoyed the sense of excitement that permeated downtown during the playoffs.”

1997

Jose “Don” C. Espanol Jr., Washington, D.C., celebrated 20 years working at National Public Radio.

1997

Amanda Mason Gadrow, Pickerington, Ohio, was promoted to VP of quality assurance and support at RStudio, PBC. Mandy is “excited to contribute in new and interesting ways to our mission to help people understand and improve the world through data.” She also “had an absolute blast” participating in her first USCA curling bonspiel in Detroit in February.

1997

“I am thrilled to be among the 35 prose writers who won 2022 fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. I’m grateful for the financial support and the vote of confidence in my fiction.”

L. Elliott Holt, New York City

1997

Adam Hunter Howard, Studio City, California, was recently selected for the Road Theatre Company’s Under Construction Playwrights residency. Each of ten writers spend nine months working on a brand-new play — they rely on one another for critical feedback and collaboration. At the end of the residency, the completed plays are presented at a public reading in Los Angeles and the company has first option on producing the works.

1997

Amanda K. Berg Wilson, Boulder, Colorado, is artistic director of the Catamounts (thecatamounts.org) and a freelance director and performer with companies around the state. “Especially excited the world premiere of ‘Theater of the Mind’ will finally happen in September, despite some COVID-induced delays,” she writes. “It’s an immersive theater piece by Mala Gaonkar and David Byrne, produced by the Denver Center’s Off-Center wing. I’m assistant directing and having the once-in-a-lifetime experience of collaborating with one of my heroes.”

1998

“Remote work options and more time together as a family let us better keep up with all the kid activities. This winter we all got into ice skating, thanks to the public rink in the park behind our house. Sean, 7, finished his first season on a swim team, and Meredith, 5, is eager to follow in his footsteps. Also, I took over as cub-master for my son’s Cub Scout pack in April. I returned to the Kane County state’s attorney’s office in February to continue my work in child protection, am still an adjunct professor of social work and criminal justice at Aurora University, and coach high school swimming.”

M. Lark Cowart, St. Charles, Illinois

1998

Aaron M. Czechowski and Adrienne L. Czechowski ’97, Sammamish, Washington, have been enjoying the Pacific Northwest for the past 10 years. Aaron has been at Microsoft for 15 years, currently leading a team of technical writers for Windows documentation. He’s also active with the Washington Trails Association, writing for the hiking guide and volunteering several times a month to help improve Washington’s expansive network of trails. “We spend lots of time at the new Climate Pledge Arena to cheer on the Seattle Kraken NHL team,” they write. “Oldest son Ezra is in his second year of a program at Washington State University called ROAR, where he’s learning to live and work independently while managing epilepsy. Daughter Sophia, a high school senior, has applied to nine small liberal arts colleges across the country — including one on a hill in central Ohio!”

1998

Kathryn Kerr Fitzsimmons moved to Savannah, Georgia, to resume a teaching career. “I missed it the entire six years I lived in Michigan,” she explains. “I teach fourth grade reading and language arts at an independent school on Wilmington Island and absolutely love it.” Her husband, who splits his time between Georgia and Michigan, will move to Savannah permanently in the next year. Since moving, she adds, “I have never had so many visitors in my life. In late January my five besties, Megan Grannis Blackmer, Kielty Gallagher Nivaud, Lauren Crossett Weymouth, Kristina Racek Pechulis and Alison A. St. Vincent Von Kennel, came for a long overdue girls’ weekend. We had a wonderful time and began planning travel arrangements for our (gulp) 25th next May!”

1998

Christine O’Neill has been spending time in Aptos, California, with the boyfriend she met a year ago “after sharing what felt like a particularly vulnerable Facebook post about what I was looking for in a guy,” she updates. “Working for myself for almost five years now, and that also keeps getting better. I support those who’ve created success on paper but don’t feel successful, and also work with executives and entrepreneurs in creating a deeper, more meaningful experience of life and work (christineoneillcoaching.com). I’m also currently in a feminine embodiment intensive program, expanding my understanding of myself and others, my capacity for love, and what it really means to follow your bliss. Pretty wild: 40s are feeling fabulous, and I’m very grateful.”

1999

“After more than a decade as an adjunct, I am finishing my first year full-time as an assistant teaching professor at Thomas Jefferson University’s East Falls campus in Philadelphia. I am feeling some survivor’s guilt but really grateful to have this position in a supportive writing department when so many adjunct professors are struggling. I am still poetry editor at Philadelphia Stories, where I coordinate the LitLife Poetry Festival, but I finally have a little more energy to spend on my own writing. Hoping to see more of Patricia M. McCartney, Mary Fran Torpey and Krista M. Apple out and about!

Courtney K. Bambrick, Media, Pennsylvania

1999

“Robert L. Lyles III and I and our three kids, 10 to 13, found time to travel and visit friends outside the COVID bubble this year. I have expanded my environmental consulting company, KLT Group, with more employees and states where we do business.”

Kelly C. (Harkless) Lyles, Cockeysville, Maryland

1999

Fernando O. Ramirez, Montesilvano, Italy, on the Adriatic coast, has lived there since 2003. “I have been loving it every day.”

1999

Richard G. Woodbridge, Lockport, New York, marked his tenth year owning and operating an organic vegetable and fruit farm near Buffalo, he informs. “The pandemic brought record numbers of customers in search of local, fresh food and an opportunity to reach underserved communities. I had the chance to create a popular beginning farmer training program for Cornell University, which I teach on the side. There are challenges to living and working on a small farm, but my wife and two daughters, 4 and 8, keep things fun and interesting.”

2000s

2000

Apple Plotnick Jannotta, Lynnwood, Washington, and her husband, Jeremy, announce the birth of their son Luca in May 2021. “He is a delight — laughter, kisses and giggles fill our home.”

2000

Vanessa MillerSims updates, “In January, my husband, 5-year-old son and I moved into a new home in Novato, California, north of San Francisco. We are enjoying settling in with a little bit more space.” Vanessa teaches high school biology and enjoys swimming in the pool and bay, she writes. “My 5:30 a.m. practices are the highlight of my week: Definitely never thought I would say that!”

2000

Dan Nemiroff and Sarah E. Holmes, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, live outside Philadelphia with their kids Max, Lilly and Izzy, and dogs Sunny and Midge. Sarah owns and operates her own law firm, and Dan works as a project manager for the region’s transit authority.

2000

Maraleen D. Shields, Allentown, Pennsylvania, submits that despite not winning election to a judgeship in Lehigh County, “We ran a successful campaign, and I’m looking to change the face of leadership in my community. I appreciate the support of Kenyon folks along the way: Michael S. Lewis, Nicholas P. Deifel ’02, Rebecca J. Kent, Kristin Ann Meister, David M. Cohen ’77, Arthur H. Stroyd Jr. ’67, Molly M. Gutridge ’99, Eugene Peterson ’70, Susan A. Apel ’83 and many more.” Maraleen settled back into private practice and is assistant solicitor for the city of Bethlehem. “If our 11-year-old (Cole) and 6-year-old (Sage) don’t keep Kevin and me too busy, I work out daily and am developing my Spanish. Starting from nothing in 2019, I am now able to speak with some fluency, which helped quite a bit on the campaign trail here.”

2001

Rowan Williams Haug, Starkville, Mississippi., teaches in Mississippi State University’s art department. “Masks off in class today for the first time in almost two years, and it has been interesting to see how different my students look than I thought they did. The last couple years saw us doing all the pandemic things: baking, making homemade pasta, canning, gardening, getting chickens and other extra pets, and reading.”

2001

Brooke E. Hauser and Addison D.S. MacDonald put down roots in Northampton, Massachusetts, where they live with their two children: Marlow, 10, and Sydney, 6. Brooke recently started working as an assistant arts editor at the Boston Globe, and Addie is general manager for performing arts and film at MASS MoCA, in the Berkshires.

2002

Rebecca M. Capasso, New York City, returned to Bellevue Hospital inpatient psychiatry in March as the associate director of inpatient services. “My two children are both in elementary school now.” She enjoys catching up with Rebecca S. Stauffer, Gina M. Sorrentino and Sarah Daily often.

2002

““I’m finally putting my political science degree to use, getting involved in politics as treasurer of a candidate running for U.S. Congress while still holding down my day job as an attorney. It has been exciting putting to use all the connections I’ve built over the last 17 years living in Fort Myers. My daughter Lily was really looking forward to visiting campus for the first time for our 20th and her first official college visit as a rising high school freshman.”

Stephanie S. Hoffman, Fort Myers, Florida

2002

Carrie N. Simon, Ithaca, New York, completed a master’s in natural resource management from Cornell in 2019 and an A.S. in graphic design from Tompkins Cortland Community College in 2021. “Currently working at Cornell as a program coordinator for the Lund Fellows Program in Regenerative Agriculture, using
my free time for my art and design work, and busy raising my kiddos, who will be 7 and 9 this summer.”

2003

“My older two, Jonathan and Colin, wore their Kenyon sweatshirts to school for college sweatshirt day. They were the only two sporting the purple! They were very proud of being so different in the land of Chapel Hill, Duke and Wake! My wife is on her way to publishing her first children’s book, ‘Stuck In the Mud’, which stars Jonathan as the main character. Look for it on Amazon in a year or so! Ian, our 1-year-old, has the nickname Joey Chestnut, since he eats more than the other two combined. Maybe a future Kenyon football player! I am still a ‘bone head’ musculoskeletal and breast radiologist with Charlotte Radiology.”

Nathan P. Fergus, Charlotte, North Carolina

2003

Nathan N. Hara and his family are enjoying Guatemala City and its “eternal spring,” he reports. “The weather is pretty much perfect all year long! I loved catching up with Eric A. Christiansen when he literally flew a jet into the country with a couple hundred acquaintances. I’d welcome other visitors before my assignment here ends next summer.”

2003

Elizabeth M. Poett, Lompoc, California, who runs her family’s cattle ranch, has a cooking show called “Ranch to Table”, now in its second season on the Magnolia Network and Discovery+. Last summer, she enjoyed a visit from Julie P. Smith and Drew E. Seaman, who have been living overseas for nearly ten years, and in Singapore for almost three. On their epic road trip while home in the States last summer, Julie and Drew covered 11,000 miles over three months, “happy to get a glimpse into the lives of many dear Kenyon friends,” they submit. Back in Singapore, Drew helps restaurants market themselves better to “kids these days,” while Julie is managing director of the AsiaPacific region for a marketing research agency.

2003

Stephanie (Todd) Waskoenig, based near Frankfurt, Germany, discovered a passion for trail running over two years of lockdown and restrictions. “I have run a couple of trail ultramarathons that were harder than my senior thesis,” she informs. She ran the Paris marathon in April and in June was to try her first 50-miler in the Alps around Salzburg. “Loved having Jeff Bridges visit a few months ago — slightly crazy to have ‘Kenyon’ here in Germany.”

2004

Michael D. DeLay, Portland, Oregon, who completed a Ph.D. in biophysics at Columbia University, runs a media group called Demystifying Science with his wife, Anastasia. “Check out our podcast and YouTube channels for illuminating analysis of nature and society! I also make records and continue to perform under the name Shilo Delay.”

2004

Ashley M. James and Elton M. Hartney James are located in Atlanta, where Elton worked as the lighting console programmer on last year’s Hawkeye and is now on to something new — but he won’t tell what it is yet. Elton traveled to New Zealand in 2020 to work on the Blue People Movie sequels — all very secretive. Ashley creates large-scale chalk art, as well as small-scale cookie art, which accidentally blossomed into a small business. “We just took our kids, Lily and Alice, on their first camping trip. Everyone agreed it was an excellent adventure, despite the temperature falling to 28 degrees on the first night.”

2004

Jennifer A. Judson, Arlington, Virginia, was elected in December as the 115th president of the National Press Club. “I am the 15th woman to serve as the club’s president and the first millennial!” she writes. “I took over in January and hit the ground running, working to promote a free press and give important voices a platform to make news. I am also still working as a full-time journalist, covering land warfare at Defense News, and accepted a media fellowship at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies this year. Husband Jim holds down the fort with our two boys (Frankie, 3, and Teddy, 1).”

2004

Emily S. (Ruffing) Herman and Derrick D. Herman live in Marysville, Ohio, where Emily grew up. A pulmonary critical care physician at Ohio State University, Derrick spent the last two years battling COVID19 on the front lines. “The demand on ICU staff has been tremendous; cautiously optimistic that the pandemic is beginning to show signs of improvement,” they share. Emily homeschools three boys (10, 7 and 5) while working part time as a family practice nurse practitioner. “My cousin was recently accepted to the Kenyon class of 2026,” Emily adds, “so we are excited to get to spend more time on campus visiting her this coming year!”

2004

Taryn A. Myers, Virginia Beach, Virginia, was promoted to full professor of psychology at Virginia Wesleyan University.

2004

Adam L. Selhorst, San Diego, took on a new role as associate provost of online and blended learning at West Coast University. “My wife, Krista, and I welcomed our firstborn son, Xavier, into the world.”

2004

Mary W. Thuell was promoted in March to commercial counsel and deal desk manager at Quorum. “Happy to have transitioned to inhouse corporate practice with a SaaS company,” she notes. Her home in Washington, D.C., is a short walk from her office at Thomas Circle.

2005

“In September of last year I began teaching religion at St. Peter’s Prep, a Jesuit boys’ high school in Jersey City. Before joining St. Peter’s, I spent ten years directing the children’s and youth ministries at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan. Prior to that, I earned a master’s of divinity at Union Theological Seminary. I still live in upper Manhattan and am thinking of moving to Jersey City so I can bike to work again. I plan to spend most of my summer in northern New Mexico making art at Ghost Ranch or chilling with my father and his wife in Santa Fe.

Andrea L. Dedmon, New York

2005

Joseph H. Freeman works for Amnesty International’s communications team as media manager for Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Joe earned a master’s degree in journalism at Northwestern University and has spent most of his career as a journalist writing and reporting in and about Southeast Asia.

2005

“This year, my husband, Jacob, and I welcomed our son, Noah, into the world. We can’t wait for it to warm up to engage in even more outdoor activities with Noah and have more people safely meet him! I currently serve as director of human anatomy at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, where I teach gross anatomy, neuroanatomy and forensic anthropology to military medical and graduate nursing students.

Guinevere E. Granite, Bethesda, Maryland

2005

“Eighteen years on, my diploma is finally an adult! These days I’m living in Portland, Oregon, with a dog and a house, working as a civil engineer. I don’t think this is where my daydreams would have taken me had I bothered to try to dream this far out all those years ago, staring into the Ohio sky. I’ve nestled into a pretty good life, though. Regrets are few.

Dan Neidecker

2005

“Joe and I are still doing the Navy thing. We’ve moved from San Diego to Jacksonville, Florida, with our three sons. Roman, our middle child, has a rare disease I want to spread awareness about called infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD), a progressive genetic disease with no cure that shows up anywhere from six months to two years old as regression in mobility and overall development. Roman went from being able to stand and sit on his own to using a wheelchair and being fully dependent on others. Four years of multiple tests, procedures and help from the Undiagnosed Diseases Network finally gave us an answer. Please check out the multiple organizations and foundations around the world that are working on a cure. Despite all the surgeries and multiple procedures, Roman remains a constant source of joy and inspiration. His smile is pure sunshine. We’re grateful for every day we have with him.

Sandra R. (Henry) Norris

2005

“After two years of pandemic house arrest, we’re all alive, still! My two daughters Mira (6) and Alex (4) are best friends, while my wife, Danielle, and I continue to do fun stuff at Google. I recently switched to lead product management for Google Brain, where I get to do stuff like build the most capable language models in the world.

Tristram B. Warkentin, Palo Alto, California

2006

Samuel W. Anderson and Grace Twesigye, Brooklyn, New York, describe themselves as “wildly competent parents of a toddler (Xavier).” Grace is head of client strategy and operations at Wiser while consulting for a diversity, equity and inclusion company called Courage Collective, and Sam continues to enjoy working for Cornell as an urban agriculture specialist. “We have now lived in Brooklyn long enough to pass as ‘hip’ or ‘gucci.’”

2006

Rayya El Zein, Philadelphia, left academia in the spring of 2021 to start at Code for Science and Society, a nonprofit working with open source, digital public infrastructure projects. “Great to see fellow alumni at some virtual events we’ve been running!” she writes. “Eager to connect with folks working in open data or public interest technology: rayyaelz@ gmail.com or @rayelz on Twitter.”

2006

“My partner and I, along with our feline fur babies, moved to Manhattan in March! After spending the past 13 years in San Francisco, I’m excited for the change and look forward to experiencing all NYC has to offer. Workwise, I just passed my six-year mark with Facebook (now Meta) and last year started a new role as a game producer — loving it. NYC-based Kenyonites, please hit me up with your recommendations!

Ginger Larsen

2007

“After nearly six years as Mass Audubon’s statewide web and e-communications manager, I left in late February to pursue a new career as a community naturalist, with a focus on native pollinator-plant-habitat conservation ecology. I’ll spend the next year and a half completing science courses, educator trainings and a graduate certificate program in natural resources management. My husband, Yuval, and I still love living in Somerville, Massachusetts. Not working means more time to get dirt under my nails in my native pollinator and certified wildlife habitat gardens.”

Erin M. Ellingwood

2007

Lisa A. Hamer, El Prado, New Mexico, and her husband, Ifeanyi, are enjoying life in the beautiful Southwest, where she remains a public defender for Taos County. They recently discovered the joy of hot air ballooning and canyoneering.

2007

Christopher B. Laco, North Olmsted, Ohio, and his wife welcomed their third child, Annabelle Rose, in September. “Everyone is healthy and doing well.”

2007

Kristopher D. Magnuson, Lakewood, Ohio, wrote and produced an experimental rock album, A Tacit Accord, with his project Ver Novum. “Streaming everywhere. Head to VerNovumBand.com to learn more.”

2007

Megan L. Maurer is assistant professor of landscape architecture and planning at the University of Copenhagen. “Jeremy S. Spater and I moved with our son, 6, to Denmark, where we enjoy biking, swimming and learning Danish.”

2007

Kelsey C. Ross has been a physical therapist for almost 10 years, she informs. “Due to the pandemic, being a traveling physical therapist alongside my boyfriend was no longer an option,” she writes, “so we settled down in Vail, Colorado. Happily, said boyfriend became my fiancé in October at 12,500 feet. Being a PT for Vail Health/Howard Head Sports Medicine has been an awesome, crazy adventure.” Kelsey worked with a variety of elite athletes, yet her most noteworthy patient was none other than the uncle of fellow Chaser Lowell J. “Tad” Gruman Jr. ’08.

2008

Rachel S. Dickson, Chicago, just finished producing a film called Let the Little Light Shine, airing on PBS in December.

2008

Delia M. (Turner) Crawford, Washington, D.C., and husband Charles welcomed a son, Malcolm, last fall. “He is adored and spoiled by grandparents Joel E. Turner ’76 and Anne B. Chamberlin ’76 and aunt Jean E. Turner ’10. We look forward to visiting campus so Malcolm can toddle down Middle Path. Still working in information management.”

2008

W. Neil Johnston, Bridgewater, New Jersey, recently accepted a job at Temple University as the associate director for graduate student experience at the Fox School of Business. “My wife and I are looking forward to getting settled in the Philadelphia area and catching up with Kenyon alums nearby!” he informs.

2008

Anthony C. Masterson, Northridge, California, is in his 11th year working for Fox Sports in Los Angeles as the network’s lead MLB and college basketball researcher. “My wife and I just closed on our first home here in the Valley, and we hope it’ll be a wonderful spot for our 2-year-old son, John, and our psycho husky dog, Zoe,” he writes.

2008

Jessie L. Rubenstein lives in Phoenix with her wife and kids Helena, 6, and Leon, 2, she writes. “In June I accepted a new position as the religious school director at Temple Emanuel of Tempe. I also graduated from Hebrew College with a master of arts in Jewish studies and a master’s in Jewish education.”

2008

Sean P. Ryan, London, Kentucky, and wife Griffin welcomed a daughter, Campbell Grace Ryan, on Feb. 1.

2008

Jennifer S. Sarma, Bethesda, Maryland, and husband Chris welcomed a son, Walter, to the family in June 2021. “Abigail, 3, is taking on her big sister role in stride,” she informs. “I am approaching my fifth year on Vox Media’s people and culture team, where I focus on employee relations and conflict resolution.”

2009

David L. Brand, Brooklyn, New York, took a job as director of content at Learfield/IMG after five years making documentaries at CBS Sports and News. Dave submitted that his puppy, Ted, recently ate his wallet — credit cards and driver’s license included. “Fortunately, Ted is a rescue from Puerto Rico and has
an incredibly efficient and resilient digestive system,” he adds.

2009

Colleen M. McLellan, Detroit, bought a house, had a baby named Rosie and joined the advancement team at Detroit Symphony Orchestra. “Shoutout to Sacha Jowise Schneider ’09 for helping me navigate the career change,” she writes.

2009

Matthew M. Peck closed on a condo in Chicago’s Roscoe Village area. Matt was a groomsman in the wedding of Andrew M. “Drew” Schad ’08 last fall. In March, he left the Locked On Bulls podcast after 4 1/2 years to accept the position of Bulls content lead at CHGO. “Very excited for this new venture and can’t wait to continue bringing Bulls fans their content in fun new ways, as the team is on the upswing,” he notes.

2010s

2010

Caitlin K. Addlesperger moved from New York to Sheridan, Wyoming, a few years ago. “My husband and I are thrilled to be back under big skies and closer to family, especially since we welcomed our amazing daughter, Hazel Kay Hoversten, last spring,” she updates. “I work for Ucross, an artist residency program on a beautiful ranch at the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains, where I have had the pleasure of meeting several Kenyonite writers, visual artists, composers and choreographers. The shared love of Middle Path is always a bond!”

2010

Maxwell H. Kelly, New York City, a plaintiff’s attorney in national consolidated mass torts actions, was a central member of the trial team that in January won a $110 million verdict on behalf of U.S. military veterans injured by defective earplugs designed and manufactured by 3M.

2010

“My football career has kept my wife, two daughters (3 and 1), and me on the move. We enjoyed our first season as Stony Brook Seawolves and have loved exploring the island.”

McNeil F. Parker, East Setauket, New York

2010

“Tjena! After ten years in Nevada and California for a Ph.D. and work, I moved to the city of Skellefteå in northern Sweden in early 2021. Seeing the midnight sun in the summer and aurora borealis regularly in the winter has been a unique experience as I contribute to building the largest lithium ion battery factory in Europe.

Andrew J. Pohlman

2010

Lee H. (Orr) White and Jamie H. White, London, England, welcomed a daughter, Anna Griggs White, on Dec. 4. “Enjoying life in London and adjusting to navigating the tube with a ‘pram.’”

2011

Ayesha Akhtar and partner Joseph J. Johnston ’10 are very happily still in the North Bronx, their “pandemic baby now a full-blown toddler,” they update. “Aidhan turns 2 in June.”

2011

Wesley J. Keyser, Chicago, recently embarked on a career change, moving from merchandising/marketing into technology as chief of staff for the Walgreens digital product and engineering team. “I would love to network with any fellow technology professionals!” he writes.

2011

“Got married in October! It was a beautiful fall day in Colorado. We got to celebrate in tie-dye with Kali Bizzul, Ayako Garduque, Gian M. Garduque ’12, Patrick T. DePriest and Eric M. Cameron. This spring I am excited to get chickens, go birding, hike and run.

Keiko P. Matsuno, Lakewood, Colorado

2011

“Man, oh man, what a ride these past couple of years have been. In May 2021, Bryn T. Stole and I biked the Great Allegheny Passage together, and I got to spend July 4 with the incomparable Hannah B. Withers in Portland, Oregon. I capped off 2021 absolutely cutting a rug at Phoebe E. Hillemann’s wedding alongside Benjamin E. McMillan, Saul B. NathanKazis, Richard and Mia J. Wylde ’12, Tricia M. Shimamura and many other spectacular alums.

Rachel N. Oscar, Cleveland

2011

“I am delighted to report that, thanks to the Bulletin, I reconnected with Ben J. Stanley ’12; they joined the faculty at the University of Delaware at the same time I started my postdoc here!”

Laura A. Paul, Newark, Delaware

2011

MaryElise Topp and her husband, James, took advantage of working from home during lockdown to move home to Ohio in 2020. “Now living our best lives as goat farmers in Ashtabula County,” she writes. “Come visit baby goats or throw a pot in our ceramics studio!”

2011

Evan A. Weiss and wife Katherine C. Warther will move to Philadelphia this summer with 1-year-old daughter Ada, he writes. “I have started as an editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer, and Katie will be a pediatrician after finishing her pediatric residency at UCLA in July.”

2012

Faith A. Bell moved back to northeastern Ohio in January and started a remote job as assistant editor for MerriamWebster, Inc.

2012

Michael E. Broida left Johns Hopkins last summer to start a similar post as a (fully remote) senior speechwriter for the CEO of Mayo Clinic. “It’s been a good challenge,” he writes, “digging into the complexities of health care and doing so from my home in Baltimore. My partner, Rachel, is in grad school for urban planning at University of Maryland, so we’ll be in Baltimore for at least another year. Glad to still live around the corner from my old McBride hallmate, Sarah E. Schulz.”

2012

Katherine E. Moore moved to the Northampton, Massachusetts, area to teach math at Amherst College. “I’m teaching the equivalent of ‘Foundations’ this semester,” Kate writes, “so I have Carol Schumacher’s textbook on my desk as we speak! In anticipation of our first snow day, I explained to a handful of new friends my childhood snow dances, involving ice cubes and dancing; they concluded it must be a Michigan thing, but I’m unconvinced. Regardless, the snow dance definitely worked.”

2012

Alexandra M. Patterson, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, is in the second year of her doctorate in education at Johns Hopkins University. Her dissertation focuses on queer faculty experiences at independent boarding schools. Meanwhile, she is director of library services at Mercersburg Academy, where she also serves as the affinity spaces coordinator.

2013

“The last few years brought many changes to my life. I celebrated five years of marriage, became a mom to a baby boy, left my job at Kenyon, started a new job at Dominican University and relocated to Chicago. I look forward to continuing my relationship with Kenyon through the Alumni of Color mentoring program.”

Jaqueline Neri Arias, Chicago

2013

Ariana R. Chomitz got married in October in L.A.; she and her husband, Owen, live in Venice Beach with their cat, Butternut, and plan a postponed honeymoon to Tanzania this fall. Ariana pivoted to full-time writing about restaurants and drives the content marketing team for ChowNow, the restaurant-friendly food-ordering platform. Her first novel is still in draft form, but the fact that there’s a draft at all is very exciting, she informs.

2013

“I’m still at IBM and still in Harlem with Heather P. Brennan ’14, but I took a new job last summer as the head writer for our AI communications team. I’m also doing editorial consulting for financial services companies to help them make their personal finance content more inclusive. Highlights of the year were mentoring Kenyon students interested in media who are already more impressive than me, and a birthday weekend in New Orleans with Thomas P. Brown and too many other Kenyon folks to list.

James F. Dennin, New York City

2013

“My wife and I were blessed with our first child this past year, and it’s so hard to believe that he was a year old — already! — in April. He is the main highlight of my life, but I am also proud to be continuing my employment, almost five years now, in the admissions office at our beloved alma mater. ”

Jeremiah J. Jemison, Howard, Ohio

2013

Rachel K. Max, San Diego, who works as a licensed clinical social worker in her own mental health therapy practice, updates, “I married my husband, Erin Dowrey, in July 2020, and we finally had our wedding celebration in December 2021, with Michelle G. Birsky and Maxwell S. Kalifut ’14 attending.”

2013

Matthew S. Metz, Arlington, Virginia, graduated from Indiana University with his J.D. and M.P.A. in 2019 before moving to D.C. He joined the Justice Department Executive Office for Immigration Review, Office of Policy through the Attorney General’s Honors Program, where he worked in communications, legislative affairs, regulatory law and legal training, and became a permanent attorney advisor a year ago. “On a personal note, I got engaged — wedding in June — and just bought a house!”

2013

“I’ve been at One Common Unity in D.C. for the last year as a drama therapist in training. One Common Unity does peace-building and wellness through the vehicles of arts, mindfulness, social justice and nature.”

Samantha M. Sheahan, Arlington, Virginia

2013

“I’m continuing my work in animal training and behavior consulting. If anyone is in the area, feel free to reach out!”

Olivia Marie Sison, Quito, Ecuador

2013

Christina A. Taliercio, Salt Lake City, Utah, and her boyfriend bought an old house they spend most of their free time renovating. “I have three cats, two of whom came with the house,” she reports. “I work for SkyWest Airlines as a first officer on the Embraer 175.”

2014

Charlotte G. Greene, New York City, recently graduated from Tyler School of Art and Architecture with an M.F.A. in sculpture. They live in Philadelphia and, after work at the architecture firm KieranTimberlake, keep busy cycling, guest lecturing and curating and pursuing art and research in digital media and fabrication.

2014

Chelsea K. (Katzeman) Kwan and Christopher Kwan ’16, Beaverton, Oregon, welcomed baby girl Gemma Charline Kwan on December 3, 2021. “She was born at 4:02 a.m., weighed 7 pounds,13 ounces and will hopefully be in the Kenyon College Class of 2044,” Chelsea informs.

2014

Sydnee M. Lindblom reports that after a year teaching high school, she returned to “the delightful awkwardness and disgusting smells of middle school.” Teaching seventh grade English at the University School of Nashville in Nashville, Tennessee, means Syd coaches swimming alongside Justin G. Karpinos ’03. “In bigger news,” she adds, “after just one delay, Basil M. Kahwash ’10 and I were married in the fall, with plenty of Kenyon alums and no COVID infections in attendance.”

2014

“I still work a lot for the Norwegian welfare organization, but I’ve gotten a new job offer and in June will start at the nearby Equality Center. I’m looking forward to working in an area I’m incredibly passionate about.”

Kristina Miklavic, Lillehammer, Norway

2014

Josiah T. Olson, Chardon, Ohio, is still working as a data scientist at Progressive Insurance, “climbing the corporate ladder,” he reports. “Son Elliot is now 5, a fun age. I spend all my free time with Elliot teaching him skiing, skating, fishing, games or just hiking around in parks. Excited to have started reading him his first chapter book series at bedtime, the ‘Chronicles of Narnia’.”

2014

When Kelsey T. Rice graduated from Kenyon, she knew she wanted to make video games but had no idea how. She has since made progress on that front and is a systems designer at Bungie, working on Destiny 2. “Living in Los Angeles with a bunch of houseplants, attending a lot of DnD 5e sessions and learned to play the penny-whistle.”

2015

Meredith E. Bentsen was recently promoted to associate, global client development, at Brunswick Group, a critical-issues firm. She lives in Washington, D.C., and enjoys joining classmates at weddings, happy hours and all the shindigs in between.

2015

Elliot L. Cromer finds himself at the Arizona Renaissance Festival performing with the Wyld Men Show, he reports. “After a hiatus from a canceled 2021 season, it is nice to be back in the desert, slathering oneself with mud for the amusement of people who have very little firsthand experience with mud.” Out of the mud, Elliot works at a brewery in Yellow Springs, Ohio. “Come visit me and Adam D. Zaremsky anytime!”

2015

Javier “Jay” Leung, Helsinki, Finland, joined Salesforce as a solution engineer for marketing tech and is finding his feet in the competitive world of enterprise sales. He and Johanna enjoyed a very snowy winter in Helsinki, which offered great conditions for cross-country skiing. They celebrated two years of marriage in January.

2015

Benjamin S. Levine finished law school in Los Angeles in May 2021 and spent the year working for a federal judge in Sacramento, where he currently lives with Sarah M. CohenSmith ’14 and eats lots of tacos. They visited David W. Floyd ’14 and Lily Moaba ’14 in Mexico City this winter and have had a great time seeing Kenyon NorCal friends, including Kaitlin C. Donnelly, Theodore W. Meyer, Jackson M. Wolf, Isaac M. Pedisich ’13 and David C. Vick ’12.

2015

Katherine J. Moss married Jake Payne on Oct. 23 in Chicago, where Katie and Jake met and have lived together the past five and a half years. Julia H. Greer and Emma G.F. Miller were by her side as bridesmaids. “The majority of Bushnell’s 201213 residents attended, as did all my NCA 18B/Marx House roommates. As the Class of 2015 has had two reunions canceled, it was nice to have some of the old group back together,” she writes.

2015

“I’m now personally responsible for all your supply chain problems! I work at Uber Freight on problems the industry experiences regularly. More important, I’m recently married — and now we are planning the wedding. I spend most of my time contemplating which pandemic hobby I can pick up and obsess over for exactly three months.”

Abigail K. Sagher, Chicago

2016

Morgen L. Barroso, Ann Arbor, Michigan, graduated from University of Connecticut School of Law in May and was elected commencement speaker. Now back in Michigan, she is studying for the bar exam and starting work as the law clerk for the chief justice of the Michigan Supreme Court. Morgen was most excited to get home to her pup, Moose, and to continue training for her first marathon in June.

2016

Lauren Bittrich, Duxbury, Massachusetts, is a literary agent at Lucinda Literary in New York City.

2016

Monica J. Lee left the corporate world during COVID to open St. Louis’ first Korean dessert cafe in February. “We sold out and were immediately busy!” she writes. “I’m now looking forward to expanding my cafe’s hours and offerings.”

2016

Mary R. Sturgis, Arlington, Virginia, graduated in December with a master of science in foreign service degree from Georgetown University and became a foreign affairs officer at the State Department. “I’m excited to continue to pursue my love of Latin America through my work with the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs,” she informs. “In even more exciting news, Bradley J. Raynor and I placed fourth at trivia.”

2016

“My fiancee and I bought our first house, moving from St. Louis to Snellville, Georgia, outside Atlanta. I’ve never lived in the South, so I’m excited to experience Bojangles, 70degree days in February and all the food Atlanta has to offer! I also had the pleasure of visiting Monica Lee’s new Korean dessert cafe, Spoonful, in St. Louis on opening weekend. The line was out the door, and everything was delicious.

Madeline R. Thompson

2017

Gianna S. (Biaggi) Anderson and Oscar L. Anderson moved back to Oscar’s hometown of Licking, Indiana, where they are currently bootstrapping a new business venture, Splat!, which produces highquality straws used for artificial insemination of cows, an endeavor they’ve partnered on since 2017. “Oscar is particularly gifted at understanding cattle ovulation cycles,” she writes. “We’ve also adopted seven small kittens.”

2017

Emma L. Brown spent last year volunteering full-time for Annunciation House, a refugee shelter at the border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. “I coordinate a warehouse that can provide for the basic needs of up to 500 guests while they begin the difficult process of applying for asylum,” she informs. “It’s been one of the most challenging and fascinating experiences of my life, and I can now speak Spanish about as well as a toddler.”

2017

Benjamin F. Grannis, Ridgefield, Connecticut, was “back east in Connecticut with my folks for a couple of months while I rest my knees, after riding 5,826 miles and raising over $35,000 to fight distracted driving and to benefit TextLess Live More.” Ben went back on the road in April; follow him at EyesUpRide. com and @EyesUpRide.

2017

Kyra A.T. Green, Arlington, Virginia, works at Georgetown University as the inaugural assistant director of diversity, equity and inclusion for the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

2017

Eleanor J.B. Lopatto accepted a position as program assistant with the Kennan Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

2017

“Had a blast visiting my close Kenyon friend in 2021 and attending another’s wedding in March! So grateful for the everlasting friendships that Kenyon brought me. I relocated back to midtown Manhattan for my new job and live on the Upper West Side. Would love to reconnect with NYC Kenyonites.”

Tianqi “Julieanna” Luo

2017

Seth T. Reichert moved to Los Angeles to pursue a master’s in urban planning at UCLA. “Enjoyed a winter full of sunny days! During the rare times I’m not studying or working, I like to play Dungeons and Dragons with a band of intrepid adventurers (Henry M. Quillian IV, Katherine L. Connolly, E. Chandler Davis and Kayla B. Glazer) and try to make a little music.”

2017

Emma L. Schurink, Farmington, Maine, is an empowerment coach (certified spiritual and life coach), “guiding people to move through limiting beliefs and fears to connect with their intuition and lead a meaningful and authentic life,” she reports. “I also work for a nonprofit in town serving atrisk youth and those with housing insecurity, merging it with my empowerment work and developing a program to empower high school students in rural Maine. I’m also an artist, making charcoal drawings (Instagram: @emmaschurinkart).”

2017

Elana S. Spivack, New York City, is a science journalist for the site Inverse. “I got my master’s from NYU in December and still think about hash brown triangles.”

2018

Mary E. Brady moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, in September and enjoys life in Boston. She works remotely as a research analyst for a financial tech company called Symend. “In November,” she adds, “I traveled to Raleigh, North Carolina, to run a half-marathon with Kara M. Braun. We both crushed our goal times, and even though I dropped my phone down a storm drain — I got it back, don’t worry! — it was a great time. I’ve loved seeing so many Kenyon alums in Boston!”

2018

Rebecca L. Frank is finishing a third year living in France, now concluding her first year as an elementary school English teaching assistant near Avignon. “I’m continuing to enjoy immersing myself in French culture, perfecting my language skills, exploring the beautiful region and soaking up the sun of southern France!”

2018

“Hej from Denmark! First as a student at the University of Copenhagen and now as a project manager at TechBBQ, I’ve been helping to put on the largest annual event for startups in Scandinavia.”

Harry E. Justus

2018

“Disney lied. It is not the happiest place on Earth. Kenyon is. My time at Kenyon was magical — the friendships made and lessons learnt were timeless!

Theuni “Anika” A. Rodriguez, Colombo, Sri Lanka

2018

Isabel R. Landers opened her own hair studio in Pittsburgh in February. “Sam and I also bought a house last year, so I guess we’re permanent Pittsburghers now!”

2019

“After working in the think tank world for two-and-a-half years, I recently started as senior associate at Breakwater Strategy, a strategic communications and insights firm. This fall, I also enjoyed working on a book project involving five other Kenyon alumni and Professor of Religious Studies Vernon Schubel.”

Henry D. Brill, Washington, D.C.

2019

Rachel I. Cohn, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, who completed her master’s in library science from UNCChapel Hill, is “still loving the Triangle area, so I’m ecstatic that I get to continue living here! I started a full-time job in January as an interlibrary requests assistant at Duke University, and it’s going great so far! The schedule challenges me constantly, but I’m slowly finding a balance. These days I’m hardcore appreciating long-distance friendships and audiobooks and my aquatic frogs and my bed. And libraries, of course!”

2019

Grace A. Fuisz, Nashville, Tennessee, works as a podcast producer for iHeartMedia’s NBA partnership slate.

2019

Caitlin Kennedy, in her second year pursuing a master’s in architecture at the University of Colorado, Denver, updates, “I’m currently part of a team working on an intensive prefabrication designbuild project with our client, NOAA. We’re working on a remote research field station located on Cape Shirreff, Antarctica! We’ll build the entire project here in Denver, disassemble it and ship it down to be reconstructed. It’s been fun including penguins and fur seals in all our drawings so far!”

2019

“I became a certified open-water diver in January and traveled to Bonaire for some of the most unbelievably biodiverse and gorgeous diving left in the Caribbean. The trip was bittersweet, as it was one of my dad’s last field trips as a marine biology professor at Wofford College before retirement — but the memory of getting to share that week with him will stay with me forever. I had close encounters with a devilishly handsome green moray eel, a maroon septapus (an octopus who must’ve had an accident), a very curious juvenile green turtle and hundreds of shimmering flying fish, which often looked like birds over the waves. It was painful to witness firsthand the reef’s destruction by cruise ships that dump trash and human waste into the ocean. In graduate school this fall I’ll study marine plastic pollution and neurotoxicology.

Jesseca M. Kusher, Spartanburg, South Carolina

2019

“After surviving a two-year process, I finally got an opportunity to work for an MLB organization. I'm with the Pittsburgh Pirates as a minor league operations assistant, working this season at the team's academy in the Dominican Republic with a great group of people and players. These past two years have given me ample opportunities to grow and showed me that it isn't supposed to be easy. Go get what you want!”

Joaquin A. Murrieta

2019

“I am thrilled to share that I've accepted a graduate position at the University of New Hampshire to study food systems and alternative agriculture. ... Eternally grateful for the support of my Kenyon professors in getting me here, and excited to move to New England this summer with Zachary D. Sawicki '16.

Elise L. Neidecker

2020s

2020

“I recently accepted a job at culture: the word on cheese magazine as digital and social media editor (culturecheesemag.com). This position has already allowed for many cheese tastings, which is a definite perk!”

Allison V. Beard

2020

“I am currently a Girl Be Heard company member, and I've also been accepted into the acting program class of 2025 at the David Geffen School of Drama at Yale. I hope to bring everything I learned from GBH about socially conscious theater-making with me to New Haven in the fall!”

Caroline A. Campos

2020

“After teaching English in Israel for a year, I decided to draft to the Israel Defense Forces, where I will serve for the next few years. I’m currently in an army Hebrew course and will be placed in my permanent unit in the upcoming months.

Nathan K. Gordon

2020

“After about a year in D.C., I feel like I’m finally settling in. I was brought on full-time at the Eno Center for Transportation to help plan professional development programming as well as write for our weekly transportation newsletter about current policy in Congress. Additionally, I’ve enjoyed meeting with Kenyon alumni who reside in the area. Reconnecting with old friends and making new ones has truly been a delight.”

Jonathan A. Hammond

2020

“After a few months driving a two-ton truck and a few months video editing in a dark room until 1 a.m., I found a comfortable place to continue growing and learning as an assistant at Diller Scofidio + Renfro in NYC.

Elizabeth A. Iduma

2020

Paul S. Sullivan, Washington, D.C., has had “a hell of a time” since graduating: moved to a new city, found a new job and fought cancer. “Yeah, that last one was a bit of a doozy,” he writes. “I was diagnosed with Stage 2B testicular cancer in September. One surgery and three cycles of chemotherapy later, I’m sitting in my apartment, cancer-free. I’ve channeled my twin loves of storytelling and history into a job at President Lincoln’s Cottage, where I educate visitors about the trials and tribulations of America’s 16th president. I don’t yet have a career planned out, and I don’t know if I’ll be living in the same place a year from now. But I’m alive, I’m breathing and I’m figuring things out. And for now, that’s enough.”

2021

“After a series of interviews — and a ton of support from the folks in Admissions — I’ll be starting work at Carnegie Mellon University as an assistant director of admission.”

Jackson C. Fletcher

2021

“I’ve been working for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education since July 2021. I am on the student outreach team, and I work specifically on a program that gives students the resources they need to create spaces for civil discourse on their campuses. I love my work.

Elizabeth W. Stanley, Williamsburg, Virginia

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