1950s

1954

John F. Barton of Washington, D.C., began 2018 by breaking a rib stepping off an escalator. He has since been to the emergency room four times, survived pneumonia twice, fallen twice (no broken bones) and had “serious unexplained weight loss,” he laments. “Worst of all, my sister Jane and her husband died two weeks apart. They were married 72 years. She just didn’t want to live long without Howie. Good news: I’m getting stronger, gaining weight, and Kenyon lives on.”

1954

William G. “Bin” James Jr., Stuart, Florida, updates: “Normal ups and downs. Kids are visiting us rather than going to see them. Jaz and I celebrated our 62nd wedding anniversary. Still enjoying the benefits of a liberal arts education from Kenyon. I’m happy.”

1955

John F. Gans, Buckeye, Arizona, survived a second round of chemotherapy — his lymphoma is in remission — and with his wife, Kathi, made their annual trip to Cancun in November. Gamber F. Tegtmeyer Jr. enjoys mountain life in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. “We’ve had a beautiful summer but desperately need rain.”

1956

Peter L. Keys, San Diego, is cruising: 10 days from Boston to Quebec visiting the Maritime Provinces and admiring fall colors along the New England coast; a tour of the Hawaiian islands; and, in February, Los Angeles to Fort Lauderdale via the Panama Canal.

1958

Dick Arkless, still swimming, biking and snorkeling the coral reefs of Indonesia’s Wakatobi Islands every year, is “trying to stay ahead of all that grows wild on our house property on the Hood Canal across from the Olympic National Park in Washington state.”

1958

Stanley G. Fullwood, West Granby, Connecticut, responds to Dale A. Neuman’s spring issue note about moving to Blue Hill, Maine: In July, Stanley married Beth Nelson, whose summer home is in Brooklin, next door. “Brooklin has some national recognition for wooden boat building,” he writes, “but is otherwise so small it has no grocery store. Blue Hill does, and that is where we go. Perhaps we will run into Dale or his daughter — that would be a kick!”

1958

Robert A. Holstein, Chicago, still practices civil litigation after relocating several years ago to a home office two blocks from the Cook County Courthouse, across from Lake Michigan and Millennium Park.

1958

Riggs S. Miller, Rochester Hills, Michigan, “finally gave up the big house and moved to senior independent living,” he writes. “Apartment with two beds, two baths, full kitchen, lovely balcony, many other perks. Try it, you’ll like it.”

1958

Phil B. Hammond, Phoenix, has been helping his five high school grandchildren — one set of twins, one of triplets, born two months apart — to hire college coaches. Seven is the recommended number of schools to apply to, he finds, and grandparent financial help is welcome.

1959

Joel F. Holmes Jr. moved to Buckeye, Arizona, last year after the death of his wife of 58 years in 2016. “Being without her has been very difficult,” Joel writes. He has “a blast” playing senior softball — and room for guests.

1959

David N. Sharlin, Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania, teaches developmental pediatrics to Rutgers pediatric residents two days a week. His oldest son, Kenneth S. Sharlin ’86, a neurologist, published a book titled “The Healthy Brain Toolbox.”

1959

Roger C. Smith has enjoyed the “slower pace of southwest Virginia and the sparkling waters of Smith Mountain Lake” for 15 years now. He cruised the Danube in July with his wife and several friends. “Sybil and I remain in good health, playing with our antique boats.”

1960s

1960

Barry N. Auger wrote from the south of France before he embarked for Spain in October: “Life is indeed good. Yes, I turned 80, and yes, I’m still working. Really dumb, but I love it.” He adds: “Sorry to have to say what you may all know already: Our friend and my dear brother Hugh S. Gage ’59 died recently. The world is poorer for his absence.”

1960

Edwin H. Eaton Jr. and Tickie continue to “suffer” on the Gulf of Mexico at Barefoot Beach in Bonita Springs, Florida. “Life revolves around golf, beach and eating out … not all bad,” he jokes.

1960

Edward Hirshfield, Cupertino, California, is a consultant for Globalstar on communications satellites, for Tigo Energy on solar cell management, and for several other companies. He and Claire, his wife of 57 years, returned from their seventh cruise, this time up the St. Lawrence Seaway from Montreal around Halifax and down to Boston. “It was a wonderful contrast to the topology we have here in Silicon Valley and San Francisco,” he writes.

1960

Wesley J. MacAdam, Arlington, Virginia, reads applications for student exchanges and spent a week in Kiev before escorting 44 Ukrainian and 11 Armenian students to Washington, D.C. “Earlier I traveled the Silk Road in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan for two weeks,” he updates.

1960

David O. McCoy writes that he is busy in Athens, Ohio, “trying to restore a sadly neglected turn-of-the-century black Evangelical Baptist church.” He also keeps up with the civic duties required by support for his wife, who is president of the Athens City Council.

1960

Merrill A. Ritter, who lives in Indianapolis with his two children and five grandchildren nearby, happily retired from orthopedic adult reconstruction in 2006.

1960

Richard M. Schori, Reno, Nevada, unhappily had to forfeit the entire cost of a Northwest Passage adventure cruise last summer when back problems related to a 2016 surgery recurred. “I have been working with doctors on nonsurgical solutions,” he writes, “but so far it is not looking good.” He celebrated the July birth of a third grandchild and his own 80th birthday with a family weekend in October. In June, his wife completes her second year as interim bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego.

1960

David D. Taft splits his retirement days between California and Michigan, driving back and forth — “a fun experience,” he writes. “I do some consulting, lots of work on local conservation, school and governance issues, and enjoy oil painting, cooking, and farming cherries and apples on Old Mission Peninsula outside Traverse City, where we have a home on Lake Michigan.”

1961

David C. Brown, Louisville, Kentucky, traveled a lot this summer: from New York to Southampton, England, on the Queen Mary 2, a four-day stay at Canyon Ranch in Tucson, and a trip to Botswana and South Africa.

1961

S. Bradley Gillaugh updates: “Though I only attended Kenyon one year, it seems time to let everyone know how much the school still means to me. I moved to New York City in 1959, spent nine years at MOMA, then 11 at Leo Castelli Gallery. In 1980 I became registrar for the ARCO Corporate Art Collection in Los Angeles. When ARCO merged with BP, I oversaw the sale of the collection and retired to Chicago in 2004, where I now happily live. A one-semester art course at Kenyon set me on track for a long career in the field.”

1961

Daniel O. Holland, Plover, Wisconsin, spent an exciting month in Montana, “arriving after the flooding and departing before the fires!” Dan finished the rough draft of his seventh novel and put together a collection of his short stories.

1961

Robert T. Riker, Vilas, North Carolina, and ADPhi brother John Richard Symons visited Australia and New Zealand in February. In May it was Slovenia, Croatia and Montenegro on the Adriatic Coast, plus Corfu, Katakolon, Santorini and Athens in Greece. This fall: Vietnam and Cambodia.

1961

Richard E. Wintermantel, Paradise Valley, Arizona, also continues to travel the world — always with a Kenyon T-shirt along, he writes. In 50 years he “has worn out seven shirts and met nine interesting people!”

1962

Charles E. Albers enjoys retirement in Sarasota, Florida, with his long-time partner, Julie. “There’s lots to do here,” he informs. Chuck is program director of the Sarasota Economics Club and recently spent time with David W. Hutzelman at the FreedomFest conference in Las Vegas.

1962

George Brownstone retired but still teaches psychiatry and psychoanalysis in Vienna, Austria — “and, thanks to technology, in Budapest, Prague and Belfast,” he adds. He reports sad news from September that Joseph D. Babb ’67 died in a car crash. “I last met him this spring, when he and Margo were on a cruise down the Danube. He was spry and in fine fettle. I’ll miss him.”

1962

Peter H. Glaubitz, Eagles Mere, Pennsylvania, spent part of October in Ecuador with a Tandana Foundation team providing medical care to children in mountainous areas inaccessible to healthcare workers. The foundation, of which he’s treasurer and a trustee, also helps villagers in Mali dig wells, build grain storage banks and improve women’s literacy.

1962

Barry C. Gorden produces a calendar of folk music events near his home in Portland, Oregon, and recovered well from a February total knee replacement. Better still, he writes, “The event of the summer was the marriage of my daughter Laule’a R. Gorden-Kuehn ’10.”

1962

Michael S. Kischner, Seattle, was elected to the board of directors of Wider Horizons Village, part of an aging-in-place network of over 200 “villages” that enable members to stay in their homes as they age.

1962

Harvey F. Lodish, who began his 51st year on the faculty at MIT, held a reunion in November for 150 of his students and research fellows, including two who won Nobel Prizes. His latest biotech company, Rubius, had a July IPO and reached a market value of $2 billion. Travels this year included China four times and Hong Kong for business and lectures; a pleasure trip to Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe; and with three grandchildren to Bali, where he officiated for the fifth time at a wedding of one of his students. Harvey frequently returns to Gambier, where his granddaughter Emma R. Steinert ’21 is a sophomore, and in October he spoke at the kickoff dinner for the Our Path Forward campaign.

1962

John C. Oliver III, Sewickley, Pennsylvania, enjoyed fishing the Clarks Fork, near Cody, Wyoming, and Yellowstone National Park. His fishing guide was Jordan E. Pakula ’17.

1962

Richard A. Rubin, San Francisco, retired in January. Looking back, he muses, “I will probably continue writing — a habit I got into while on the Collegian. Without the education Kenyon offered, life would not have been as rich and full. Hello to whatever is next. Thank you, Philander — you did your job.”

1962

Robert D. Vance, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, teaches in Duke’s continuing education program. “Despite medical issues and other hassles, such as the damage Florence inflicted on our beach property,” he sums up, “I feel fortunate to be teaching, traveling, playing tennis, exhibiting my photography and otherwise enjoying a full, good life.”

1962

Jack L. Wagner, Williamsburg, Virginia, experienced shortness of breath and went in for a scan, expecting a minor problem, having eaten healthfully and exercised all his life. However, when cardiac catheterization showed all of his arteries blocked, Jack underwent immediate emergency quadruple-bypass surgery. “Everyone says my initiative helped me dodge an inevitable heart attack,” he informs. “The moral is that you know your body better than anyone else, and if you think something is wrong have it checked out immediately!”

1963

Clifford T. Donley, Columbia, South Carolina, experienced “tremendous upheaval” in September when his uncle, William M. Donley ’39, died on his 102nd birthday. Bill’s love of Kenyon, Cliff remembers, “played a major role in his and my Aunt Eleanor’s lives over the decades. Our country has lost a veteran of two wars, my family has lost its patriarch, and I have lost my friend.”

1963

John C. Gerlach is adapting to life with Alzheimer’s. “I enjoy going to Indians games with my daughter, participating in activities in Independence Village Senior Living Community in Aurora, Ohio, and staying in contact with two very sweet and athletic grandchildren,” he writes.

1963

David H. “Dusty” Stiles, Northridge, California, does studio design and repair at Beverly High School, video and sound projection at church, and produces an annual photo calendar featuring shots he’s taken on his travels around California. A grandson, now 7 months old, was born with Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder affecting the white matter of the brain and causing short life expectancies. “This is one of those situations where you dig in and make things work as best you can,” Dusty writes.

1964

P.F. “Fred” Kluge teaches two evening seminars in creative writing at Kenyon but retired from advising the Collegian after about 20 years. “What might be my 13th book is in the hands of my agent,” he updates.

1964

Walter W. Nielsen, Phoenix, retired from the field of intellectual property after 50 years of learning electronic and computing technologies from inventors at Honeywell, Motorola and Intel. He is principal clarinetist with the Scottsdale Philharmonic Orchestra and “loved playing the introductory solo in ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ last year,” he writes.

1964

Eric A. Summerville lives in St. James, North Carolina, “a short distance from where Hurricane Florence first touched land,” he reports. “We returned about seven days after a mandatory evacuation. Unlike with some of our neighbors, no trees fell on the house nor did we have water damage.”

1965

Richard E. Passoth teaches classes for an elder adult education program connected with the University of Denver. “Been hiking like mad in the mountains,” he notes. “Thirteen-mile hikes, 2,300-foot elevation gains … not bragging, but hey, it’s worth mentioning.”

1965

Edward W. Pettigrew, Seattle, is active with the foundation he and his wife founded in memory of their son, David, who died in a snowboarding accident in 2005. The foundation is involved in numerous mountain safety activities, including sponsoring free avalanche-awareness and companion-rescue workshops at three ski resorts.

1966

William E. Campbell and his wife are “still hanging on in Hudson, Wisconsin, enjoying semi-retirement,” Bill updates. “Suzy works part time in an art gallery. I consult a little on higher ed — and make lots of chips and sawdust in my wood shop. We both enjoy our grandchildren and do our best to fend off the ravages of age.”

1966

John O. Case, Williamstown, Massachusetts, shares “one interesting bit of Kenyon news: For years I’ve been organizing art events for the Hoosic River Watershed Association, and this year I invited Robert P. Moyer to lead three workshops in haiku writing. Bob has published a wonderful book of his haiku called ‘The Last Bite.’”

1966

Frank B. “Burt” Dibble is a part-time hospice medical director and works in an opioid abuse treatment clinic. As a zoning board member in historic Rye, New Hampshire, Burt is helping protect and restore the “beautiful Town Hall, having just saved it from the developers who wanted to tear it down and replace it with something ‘modern and efficient,’” he explains.

1966

Lowell S. Gaspar, San Diego, wonders if his current retirement will end up taking him “impolitely near” his daughter Elizabeth in Texas. In the meantime he will pursue his quest for fulfillment “just as soon as I get done walking the dog, working out, grocery shopping, playing with my Tesla3 and seeing the doctor instead of being one.”

1966

Ken S. Honbo and his wife, Nancy, celebrated their 50th with their two sons and families on the Big Island of Hawaii. “Although we have been going there on a regular basis since 1980,” Ken adds, “this 50th was pretty special — and this old goat even tried zip-lining.”

1966

Robert P. Moyer judged the annual contest of the British Haiku Society and was featured at a reading at Haiku London. “I was privileged to spend a month in Los Angeles in Viola Spolin’s house,” he reports. Bob enjoyed his visit with William E. Campbell (described above by Bill). He also spent a month in Germany playing the sport petanque and won fourth place in the Mid-America Regional Petanque Tournament.

1966

Charles F. Peace IV moved from Baltimore to a retirement community in Towson, Maryland, called Edenwald. Last Easter, he reports, Charlie also became a Roman Catholic at an Ordinariate established by Pope Benedict XVI to help Anglicans become Roman Catholic while retaining their traditions. “It was like coming home.”

1966

William P. Rice closed on the transaction to take his company private on April 1, which meant relinquishing the president and CEO titles to become executive chair. Bill and Lynn moved into a new house they built in Duxbury, Massachusetts. His spine surgery was scheduled for the fall.

1966

Victor H. Sparrow III wrapped up 10 years of teaching in Hangzhou, China, and in full retirement now counsels Chinese students and studies Chinese culture and language at home in Baltimore.

1966

Gordon L. Todd, Omaha, Nebraska, enjoys being retired from teaching anatomy to medical students.

1966

Peter A. White, Gambier, Ohio, updates: “Last August saw the birth of granddaughters on the 19th and 20th, and a bulldog puppy on the 2nd. I am grateful to be responsible for the puppy only. It seems amazing to me: No matter how distressed we may be about the state of the world, the desire to multiply and to love continues unabated.”

1967

Edward J. Forrest Jr., Marietta, Georgia, confesses, “It’s not possible for me to explain how a religion major ended up in fiber-optic inspection and cleaning,” but he has been granted another patent and finished a textbook on the topic. He enjoyed a visit to Atlanta with Bill S. Schnall to hear accounts of his Antarctica trip.

1967

John F. Landis joined the Marines after graduation before working for Whirlpool/Maytag, but he has now retired to “the life of Riley in Sacramento.”

1967

Lewis D. Rich has been happily living in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, for eight years and has more interesting friends there than anyplace else he’s lived, he reports. “Saw that Charles Schwarzbeck III is living here also.”

1967

Arthur H. Stroyd Jr. practices law at his firm in Pittsburgh and hosted many alums at his September wedding: R. Barry Tatgenhorst, Douglas Heuck ’84, Elizabeth Stroyd Windsor ’98, Victoria H. Kirby ’98, Virginia (Secor) Shaw ’98 and Alexandra J. (Mustonen) Whelehan ’98.

1968

Michael J. Brown, Claremont, California, had shoulder replacement surgery in late June. “Still working hard,” he reports. “Blood cancer in remission. Actually feel good. Gary L. Nave and I should be a tag team — the Replacees!”

1968

Timothy R. Holder moved from northern Virginia to Wilmington, North Carolina, and “bought a house just in time to watch the eye of Hurricane Florence pass over the house (literally),” he informs. “Tornado passed 10 feet from our backyard. My wife, Sue, our Afghani daughter Holly, now 21, and I are otherwise enjoying the warm climate and warm folks.”

1968

Richard H. Levey, Detroit, was pleased to join his ’68 brothers in Gambier before returning home to participate in direct actions in the 2018 Poor People’s Campaign: “three misdemeanor trespass, one resisting and obstruction felony.”

1968

Gary L. Nave celebrated the Sept. 15 wedding of son Gregory L. Nave ’04 in the Berkshires. Gary’s roommate Robert L. Nevin Jr. ’69 and daughter Kate (Nave) Thoms ’97 and her husband R. Justin Thoms ’98 also attended. Bob and his wife escaped Hurricane Florence to Gary and Linda’s home in Bedford, New York.

1968

William M. Northway, Frankfort, Michigan, wonders: “How do you quit something that you love? I love doing orthodontics.” Bill receives hugs from long-ago patients and is still learning how to improve care. “Why would you retire from that? Maybe the best thing, though, is keeping in touch with Paul Rigali — a phenomenal leader in our field.” Bill’s niece Allison J. Mauk ’08 married James Reid ’08 in September.

1968

Pierce E. Scranton Jr., Ketchum, Idaho, informs: “Fifty-four years after taking a year of French from Professor Harvey, I got to speak it in Paris with my wife on a wonderful trip.”

1969

Kenneth R. Abraham reports recent success in getting two men from a homeless shelter in Dover, Delaware, off probation: “They are very happy campers, and for me it’s a blessing to be a blessing. I guess I learned something in chapel! I do it for free and have helped hundreds, only two denied.”

1969

John D. Baird retired from his law practice in Norwalk, Ohio, to Punta Gorda, Florida. “Life in God’s Waiting Room has resolved itself to the occasional nap, happy hours and waiting for monthly visits from Uncle Sugar and the pension man bearing checks,” he shares.

1969

William E. Blank, Sacramento, California, has retired from careers as a rabbi, fundraiser, hypnotherapist and technical writer “with varying degrees of success.” Married 48 years to Wendy, with three daughters and three grandchildren, he hits the gym, makes homemade jam and serves as president of Home of Peace, the Jewish Cemetery of Sacramento.

1969

Stephen R. Crocker, Flat Rock, North Carolina, continues to battle Parkinson’s: “I’m able to do most things with the help of a walker and power wheelchair,” he reports. “Still, I count my blessings every day. One is my soul mate Judy.” After 22 years together, they married in June. He remains in touch with co-workers at the news radio station in Chicago where he was a reporter and anchor for 30 years.

1970s

1970

Charles E. Acton, Lake Forest, California, is “trying to get used to semi-retirement” after selling his veterinary hospital business last year. “I maintain ownership of the land/building,” he adds, “so I guess my encore career is property management. Can’t complain.”

1970

Richard J. Brean, Pittsburgh, retired in April as general counsel of the United Steelworkers Union, whose legal department he joined in 1978 right out of Harvard Law School. “I’ll be keeping very busy,” Rich updates, “as chair of the Peggy Browning Fund, a charity that sponsors a paid summer internship program that encourages law students to consider careers in public and private settings that advance justice in the workplace.”

1970

Byard Q. Clemmons, Hot Springs, Arkansas, visited Michael S. Hill and his wife, Sue, in San Francisco and, with Jim Nininger and James S. Hecox, made their annual trek to the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York City.

1970

Jeffrey A. Goldberg, Chevy Chase, Maryland, reconnected after many decades with Robert M. “Glade” Gladstone ’69, and informs: “Glade has been residing for two years at Oceana Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, a long-term facility in Cape May, New Jersey. Glade would welcome hearing from friends and classmates.”

1970

Jerry F. Gurkoff, Corsicana, Texas, started an orthopedic surgical practice in Saipan on a 10-week trip there. “It was a challenge and a joy,” he sums up, “though still a work in progress.”

1970

William F. Paraska, Alpharetta, Georgia, tried out pack burro racing in Leadville, Colorado, this year: “Great little animals, but they do have their own ideas of when and how fast they want to move.” He also attended a reunion for those who served at U-Tapao Royal Thai Naval Station from 1965 to ’75. A road trip to Bar Harbor, Maine, allowed visits with Thomas G. Bentson Jr. and Peter A. Fluchere.

1970

Robert A. Strong, Lexington, Virginia, writes political commentary and “occasional attempts at humor,” but no longer on his Huffpo blog. A parody of the old song “Stormy Weather” and a version of the Gettysburg Address delivered by Donald Trump in seven tweets are available at strong.academic.wlu.edu.

1971

“Still enjoying the fruits of early retirement 16 years ago. I’m active on my blog, agoodmantoknow.com, and recently published an op-ed in the Madison, Wisconsin, Capital Times.”

Bruce M. Dunlavy, Bowling Green, Ohio

1971

Thomas H. Hollinger, Washington Depot, Connecticut, is still selling the occasional painting, gardening and chairing the Washington Historic District Commission.

1971

Martin R. Kurcias, Annapolis, Maryland, stopped by the Hill on his way home from Minneapolis for the first time since 1973. “I was pleasantly surprised that the campus and Gambier had not changed all that much in my estimation,” he reports. “Samuel Barone ’72 welcomed me into his home in Mount Vernon for the night, and we had a good time catching up.”

1971

Stanley J. Litz still practices law in Cincinnati, “tilting lances at sesquipedalian ERISA laws and regulations,” he updates. “Also teaching art to wayward youth and seniors. I have exhibited works in galleries and museums in the U.S. and Europe. New hips, right knee and shoulder.”

1971

Robert C. Patrick retired from teaching and administration in American independent schools in 2011 and, after stints in Egypt and Taiwan, has moved to the southwest Aegean coast of Turkey. “We help develop Turkey’s first academy of the third age,” Bob explains, “that organizes and runs diverse activities, cultural programs and travel opportunities for a group of almost 500 people, most of whom are Turkish. Special thanks to Professor Robert Bennett for Classical civiliza-tion courses that introduced me to the history and cultures of this incredible region!”

1971

Michael W. Rosenberg, Fort Myers, Florida, sends news of the arrival of a fourth grandchild. “I was hoping he would be born before the submissions deadline.”

1971

Norman E. Schmidt, Cleveland, made it to a couple of Indians games with James F. Loomis ’73 this summer, and has lunch with Susan Paley Weaver ’73 and John H. Emack ’72 occasionally. He also attended the Kenyon swimmers get-together at the home of Dennis P. Mulvihill ’88.

1971

Thomas D. Southworth was “mostly retired” in Cranston, Rhode Island, when he was called to take up a one-year interim position as dean of enrollment management at the Lawrenceville School. “So here I am once again in the boarding-school world,” Tom writes. “I’m having a grand time!”

1972

William S. Cline, North Canton, Ohio, took “of counsel” status with his law firm — “which means I am essentially retired but still hanging around,” he explains. “I still serve as a member of the board of elections, which ties me to Stark County. I have accumulated three motorcycles and spend as much time on two wheels as I can.”

1972

David M. Jaffe appeared in a new play titled “The Pattern at Pendarvis” in New York City. Very well-received,” he shares, “and very gratifying to have the inimitable David B. Erickson show up for a performance and dinner after.”

1972

Preston Lentz, Honolulu, and his wife are thrilled to have their daughter living with them after her move from Mississippi. On June 9, Preston’s bishop ordained him as a transitional deacon in the Episcopal Diocese of Hawaii. He expects ordination to the priesthood in the coming year “if the people are willing — I just hope no one contacts Charles T. Capute between now and then!” he jokes.

1972

Diane Markham Lane, Mequon, Wisconsin, has a new home on a beautiful lake after “mostly” retiring from her graphic design business. In addition to a “charming 1-year-old grandson” living nearby, she has a newly minted license as a bartender at her local art museum.

1972

Richard A. Rothermel retired a few years back as Otsego County public defender after 33 years there. Now Otto will split time between St. Thomas and Arnold Lake, New York. “Must be something about water,” he muses. “Life has been good and will be even better with more time for grandkids. Kenyon education made the difference.”

1973

Thomas E. Allen, Takoma Park, Maryland, finds it “thrilling to be living in D.C. these days, so close to the seat of power!” Tom’s academic cycle at Gallaudet University began again for the 39th time this fall — “so difficult for me to take that leap into retirement from this spinning top.”

1973

Julie F. Johnson, Urbana, Ohio, serves on the national board of the Garden Club of America. “Did you know Kenyon is an increasingly ‘rare species,’” she adds, “as botany is no longer taught in many colleges?”

1973

Melanie M. (Jackson) McLane, Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, was named Pennsylvania Realtor of the Year. She teaches real estate and runs a residential brokerage. Widowed, she has “four fabulous grandchildren,” she notes.

1973

Susanne Mize, Gallipolis, Ohio, retired in March after 36 years as a non-invasive cardiologist. She writes she is “beginning to read about things that have been put on hold while I was working.”

1973

Mark E. Rakoczy and his wife, Marianne, celebrated their 42nd in November with all five children and seven grandchildren present. Living in Glenview, Illinois, Marianne has retired from teaching, and Mark continues to practice law on a part-time basis as a trial lawyer/litigator.

1973

Lavinia A. Wright retired in May after 26 years in state water protection programs.

1974

Jamie J. Barth and Richard E. Yorde Jr. ’76 are loving their “Chicago loft life.” They recently had dinner with Linda K. (Cliffel) Brongel ’73 and enjoyed “a surprise birthday adventure” to Mineral Point, Wisconsin, with its colorful House on the Rock, along with Frank Lloyd Wright’s “enchanting” nearby studio home, Taliesin.

1974

Bruce E. Betz, Seattle, is communications director for the University of Washington School of Social Work.

1974

Jeffrey C. Brown, Bozeman, Montana, spent his summer “hosting guests, splitting firewood and building a garage.” Son Dash graduated from Cornell and moved to Baltimore to work as a computer scientist at Booz Allen Hamilton. Jeff freelances investment stories to the Wall Street Journal and other outlets.

1974

Richard J. Clarke celebrated his 25th year as director of music and liturgy at St. Bartholomew Catholic Church in Wayzata, Minnesota. That makes 50 years of unbroken service as a church musician. He and Janet celebrated their 14th wedding anniversary in December.

1974

Geraldine Coleman Tucker sold her house in the suburbs to move to a condo in Alexandria, Virginia. “Michael and I are enjoying urban living,” she informs. They celebrated their 38th anniversary and, in October, traveled to Palestine and Israel.

1974

Alva G. Greenberg writes that she can “ignore her age when with her four grandchildren and more than feel it once they depart.” Her last independently curated art exhibit, titled “On Another Note: The Intersection of Art and Music” at the Lyman Allyn Museum, was a hit. Her philanthropy and volunteering have won her the Governor’s Award for Patron of the Arts in Connecticut.

1974

William Nininger, Woodbury, Connecticut, is still singing, songwriting and playing guitar with various groups of musicians, including Peter Moffitt ’72.

1974

Frank K. O’Donnell now lives in Arlington, Tennessee, outside Memphis. “Having retired following 23 years as a criminal investigator for the Navy, I now do volunteer work. And I serve as the adjutant for our local American Legion post.”

1974

Diane L. Goforth Ohning, Greenville, South Carolina, has sent two of her four children, both swimmers, to Kenyon: Collin R. Ohning ’11 and Aidan V. Ohning ’20. “I have enjoyed so much sitting at the VI listening to my guys and their buddies talk about their Kenyon lives,” she updates. “Every time I spend some time alone strolling Middle Path, looking up at Old Kenyon, Ascension, Rosse, peeking in the chapel, the place never fails to work its magic on me.”

1974

David J. Utlak, Canton, Ohio, and his wife, Barb, had dinner with Coach Bill Heiser and his wife at the Kenyon Inn in August. Kim Stapleton Smith joined them, and all shared fond memories. David prac-tices cardiology and hopes to continue doing so for 10 more years.

1974

James W. Vick recently retired after over 35 years as a family doctor in Haddonfield, New Jersey. Jim and Julia Miller Vick ’73 are enjoying traveling, visiting family and friends, and spending time with their three grandchildren.

1974

Robert G. Wetzel, Arroyo Grande, California, ended what he calls a “long and checkered career in the mineral exploration business” and now works on an exciting lithium salar project. “Just trying to do my part to save the planet — and my retirement account,” he explains. “The chance to go kayak fishing and see the grandkids whenever I want makes up for the high price of everything and Kenyonesque air of political correctness here in California.”

1974

Ty Wilburn “failed” his “third retirement,” he informs. “I’ve started yet another company in the hospital business (own and manage). Most of my last company’s team has joined me. Still splitting time between Naples, Florida, and Louisville, Kentucky. All of my family is healthy and happy. Cheers!”

1975

Dean N. Chantiles retired from United Airlines in June after 33 years, concluding with captainship of a Boeing 777. “My first retirement task,” he writes, “was to finish ‘Infinite Jest’ — the only book I had ever started and not finished. (Yes, I finished ‘Ulysses’).” Dean splits time between Palm Springs and Palos Verdes, California, busy with swimming, cycling, running, guitar and astronomy.

1975

Richard L. Dachman and his husband celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary (together for 25). After 36 years in Los Angeles and now having retired as an architect, he’s moved to Palm Springs: “After growing up in Ohio and surviving the winters,” Richard writes, “the summer heat in Palm Springs is great but can be challenging at times.” He’s riding his Harley, hiking the local hills and mountains, cooking and “just enjoying the time we have.”

1975

Richard E. Gordon was “promoted to retiree” from the University of Delaware after 35 years there and moved to Pittsburgh. Now operating “Grandpa’s Play Service” for his son’s two kids, he also has a folk music radio show on WRCT and other stations called “Whiskey Before Breakfast,” named for an American fiddle tune.

1975

Michael R. Halleran will step down as provost at William & Mary to “return to being a full-time classicist,” he updates, “my zeal for which was inspired by Professor Emeritus Bill McCulloh many years ago.”

1975

Connie A. Howes was elected in April to the board of directors of Washington Trust Bancorp, a publicly owned community bank based in Rhode Island.

1975

Arthur M. Marx and classmate Kevin J. Martin have been working for Thomas A. Lucas on his new enterprise, MagellanTV, “a subscription service offering a wide variety of video documentaries to discerning viewers,” he informs. Kevin is lead writer of the website’s blog; Arthur is a writer/editor; and Tom still calls Arthur “Artie,” but Arthur has learned to call Tom “Boss.” Living in Sarasota, Florida, Arthur “looks after his 101-year-old mother and asks random strangers if they know where the time goes,” he adds.

1975

Fran M. (Lugbauer) Mueller and Carl G. Mueller ’73, married 44 years, are retired and reside in Kennebunk, Maine. Two grown children are — “thank goodness,” she writes — gainfully employed in Virginia and New York City.

1975

Philip B. Olmstead, New Hartford, New York, is a live-in caretaker at an Episcopal ecumenical center called “Transfiguration House” on the parklike grounds of a former convent. Phil has been busy painting historical properties, including the house, an 1814 church in which Philander Chase preached before departing for Ohio.

1975

Donna Bertolet Poseidon of Atlanta celebrated her milestone birthday — “the one we all shared this year,” she adds — by running her first marathon. “Since it’ll be a ‘one and done,’ we decided to aim big and go for the Athens race. I won’t approach Pheidippides’ time, but finishing in the Olympic Stadium sure will be something.”

1975

Pam (Cole) Schneider lives north of Orlando, Florida, and recently completed construction of a dressage training facility with 16 stalls. “My horses and I are thrilled to have our own farm,” she updates. “Travels in the past year have taken me to Portugal and Spain, and South Africa, Botswana and Zambia.”

1975

Alice Cornwell Straus plans to spend a third of her years happily retired from Kenyon traveling — so far to Quebec, Wales, the Lake District of England, London and Wisconsin. On Oct. 25 she received a Middle Path Medal at the Founders’ Day ceremony in recognition of her service to Kenyon and the Gambier community.

1976

David E. Griffith, New Hope, Pennsylvania, still works in Philadelphia with Episcopal Community Services on intergenerational poverty issues. He spoke at several conferences this year on the issues of race, poverty and privilege (read his remarks at wearmuddyboots.com). He and Jacqueline McEwen Griffith ’77 had a wonderful visit with Leslie Hollenbaugh Ross and Peter Ross, and he recommends their cooking.

1976

James W. Kraft, Carmel, Indiana, still writes for a couple of well-known comic strips, he informs, “but my real job is joining my wife, Jean, in babysitting a little ball of sunshine named Evie. Being her grandpa is the best.”

1976

Warren C. Osgood, Stockton, California, was closing his law practice in December after 29 years in the legal profession.

1976

Robin E. Osler’s firm EOA/Elmslie Osler Architect designed the now-completed gift shop at the new Portland Japanese Garden complex in Portland, Oregon. Another project, the community space for the YM/YWHA of Washington Heights and Inwood in New York City, was an honoree in Interior Design magazine’s Best of the Year awards. Still teaching at City College of New York, Robin recently traveled with two of her students to present a project they designed for an assembly space in a village in the Maasai Mara in Kenya.

1976

Leslie Hollenbaugh Ross and Peter Ross both retired and celebrated 40 years of marriage in August. In addition to hosting the Griffiths, they saw classmates James A. Frank and his wife, Belle, and Christopher J. Myers and Elizabeth Murdock Myers.

1976

Eugene R. Thomas and Michele M. Moisio ’77 live in Spring, Texas, where they are thoroughly enjoying their four children and three grandchildren. They celebrated their 40th in May by hiking the Rob Roy Trail in Scotland and multiple mountains in Japan.

1977

Judy (Rosemon) Parnes, Columbus, Ohio, finds her counseling practice presents her with “ever more challenge, particularly in these divisive, often painful and triggering times.” She finds meaningfulness in yoga, reading, hiking with husband Marc, and recent travel to visit her daughter in Oregon and other family on Cape Cod. She recently hosted Edwin S. “Win” Sheffield Jr., Linda I. Angst, Frederick G. Tiffany, and Stanley J. Varnhagen and Constance (Kendall) Varnhagen.

1977

Greta N. Scharnweber left her job after 10 years at NYU’s Middle Eastern Studies Center to join the Institute of International Education as director of its Fulbright Visiting Scholars program. “It’s been a challenging and fascinating ride so far,” she reports. “Luckily, I didn’t have to move away from my beloved New York!” With daughter Minu (4) “graduated” from day care and joining the school of big brother Leo (7), Greta and her husband will have only one dropoff and pickup for four years.

1977

Sarah S. Allan started a new job at the Defense Health Agency near her home in Arlington, Virginia. In October, as of day three, she updated, “so far it’s great!”

1977

Jayne S. Danska, Toronto, sends word that her daughter Fiona Danska Guidos ’22 is a first-year housed in Norton, which is “unchanged from our day.” Jayne reports: “A wonderful experience to see Kenyon through her generation’s eyes.”

1978

Rosemary Brandenburg, Beverly Hills, California, is working on her second film in the U.K.

1978

William M. Carlson wrote from Arecibo, Puerto Rico, during a moment of limited connectivity — Bill was wrapping up a house-rebuilding mission for homes damaged by Hurricane Maria. Earlier, he worked on a water-purification project in Haiti.

1978

Carol L. Dietrich and James S. Franchek headed out to cruise Picture Rocks in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula during their cross-country journey in their Airstream. Ten thousand miles so far, she reported in October. David H. Feldman, Williamsburg, Virginia, returned to Kenyon to help kick off the Our Path Forward campaign at the invitation of President Sean Decatur. “I got to see all the new construction that will bring the academic campus up to date,” he informs. “I also got to reconnect with my very first editor, Matthew A. Winkler ’77.”

1978

Katharine R. Golden still teaches at Seattle Waldorf School. Kate explains that she teaches one set of students for eight years; her current class is in sixth grade. This fall she spent a week camping, hiking and studying geology at Mount Saint Helens.

1978

Robert M. Liegner, Randolph, New Jersey, entered the Kenyon Athletic Hall of Fame for lacrosse goaltending when he returned for homecoming in September.

1978

The Rev. James H. Logan, Huntersville, North Carolina, married on Oct. 14. Also, Jim was consecrated as presiding bishop over Kingdom Fellowship of Churches International. Coleman S. Moore, Milwaukee, is six years into an enterprise he founded called Custom Cottage: a for-profit furniture maker that hires and trains ex-cons, the homeless, addicts and PTSD vets. An Indianapolis location, its third, opened last year. “We’re building lives through building furniture,” he explains.

1978

“Hard to fathom that it has been 40 years since graduation. Still representing children with disabilities pro bono. Participation in the Legal Aid Society of Columbus’ naturalization clinic really gives you perspective.”

Susan G. Tobin, Columbus, Ohio

1979

Randy Bank, New Albany, Ohio, wanted to share that he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. After much treatment, his most recent scans show him cancer-free. “Needless to say, I feel lucky every day,” he writes. He has practiced education law since 1984.

1979

Mike Cummiskey and his wife traveled from their home in Paradise Valley, Arizona, to Switzerland this summer. They stayed overnight in Sils-Maria at the Nietzsche-Haus, he reports, “where Nietzsche spent several summers and wrote the majority of ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra.’ The curator showed us where he routinely walked this incredibly majestic and inspiring setting.”

1979

Jeffrey S. Day, Kensington, Maryland, updates: “After 38 years of reporting on federal and state government policy and law, the news industry and the country have changed so much it no longer appeals. I got a good buyout from downsizing Bloomberg BNA.” He’s been to Yosemite with his two boys who live on the West Coast, and almost every winter finds time for skiing with George M. Layburn, Robert B. O’Connor, Peter A. Hoagland, Philip F. Abraham, Gregory Jacoby and Robert B. Slattery III.

1979

Elizabeth Mueller Gross and Thomas S. Gross share their happiness as Erik N. Gross ’18 accepted his Kenyon degree.

1979

Kristin Olsen Kiser sends greetings from her 240-acre farm in southeastern Ohio: “Since retiring in May after 35 years with the National Institutes of Health, I am dividing my time between D.C. and Athens, Ohio. My farm goals are to earn income to cover expenses, restore my century barn, learn to operate my tractor safely over the rolling hills, and give back to this impoverished Appalachian community.”

1979

John C. Porter II relocated to Belgium after 20 years in Australia. “If you wonder why,” he notes, “you wouldn’t be the first. My daughter has only started to be cordial to me again at 18.” John is leading a company and polishing his Dutch, enjoying life in Antwerp. “To my absolute delight,” he adds, “Gary Yacoubian is a routine visitor!”

1979

“Still taking pictures after all those years at The Collegian! I have had my own corporate photography business in Connecticut for close to 30 years, and in the meantime raising three boys, all out of school and working.”

Spencer A. Sloan, Connecticut

1979

Tracy Teweles, Evanston, Illinois, is now a licensed Reiki practitioner, jewelry designer and pet portrait (collage) artist. “Love being retired! Wanted something spiritual and visual in this life phase.”

1980s

1980

Valerie J. (Merkel) Bodell, Johnson City, Tennessee, describes her life as “a lot of ordinary punctuated by bits of personal excitement,” which included a master’s from East Tennessee State, where she now teaches as an adjunct. “I find my life very fulfilling and enjoy the community outreach that is a large part of what we do here,” she adds.

1980

Mary A. Boutselis, Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, and her husband retired in December from their practice as clinical psychologists. They’ll split their time between their home and a new bit of property in Montana outside Yellowstone. “I’m in touch with David W. Knowlton and Maryanna D. Klatt ’82 but would love to hear from other Kenyon friends.”

1980

Timothy Herron married his partner, Ercole Spadaro, in a small ceremony in the living room of friends in Shaker Heights, Ohio. After 20 years together, he writes, “Being married does not change who we are for each other. But we are so honored, happy and grateful to have the privilege of getting married, a right that was not available for us until three years ago.”

1980

Elizabeth E. Hutchins, New York City, had this to say about her twins applying to colleges: “Aaaaaack! I am anticipating their departure with equal parts terror and excitement. Yikes. We are being ably helped by an admissions professional from Kenyon who has joined our high school college admissions staff. He is amazing!”

1980

Heather Thomas Lazare, Houston, lost her home in Hurricane Harvey. She and her husband moved to an apartment within walking distance of her job as events coordinator at the Center for Languages and Intercultural Communication at Rice University. Her daughters are grad students in California and Massachusetts.

1981

Robin L. Bennett, Bellevue, Washington, begins a three-year term on the board of directors of the American Society of Human Genetics.

1981

Wendy (Webb) Cook, Hinsdale, Illinois retired after 25 years at McDonald’s Corp. “I’m lovin’ it,” she informs. “I kicked off my retirement by hiking 300 miles of the Camino de Santiago in Spain.” Wendy’s oldest daughter, Sarah B. Cook ’11 married William L. Kessenich ’11 and is an ER doc.

1981

Steven R. Counsell sends warm regards from Indianapolis: A professor of medicine at Indiana University, Steve stepped down after nearly 20 years as founding director of the IU geriatrics program and currently serves as medical director for the Division of Aging in the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration.

1981

Martha (Roberts) Haddon, Alpharetta, Georgia, reports her corrugated packaging business is still going strong at year 35. “Have been able to see Suzanne (Kellermeyer) Regan when she travels to Atlanta and am still waiting for a mini-reunion (you know who you are) at Daufuskie Island!”

1981

Catherine Hazlett reports that out on the golf course Deirdre (Kelly) Moore does a beautiful job getting out of the traps, “unlike moi.” Cathy started a new position with Family Centers Health Care in Greenwich, Connecticut, as the health and substance misuse educator.

1981

Ronald J. Link reports that the Bronx high school where he’s been principal for six years has embarked on the only Latin/Afro-Caribbean jazz program in the country sponsored by Jazz at Lincoln Center.

1982

Robin Agnew, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and her husband, James F. Agnew ’80, closed their mystery bookstore, Aunt Agatha’s, in August after a 26-year run. “Jamie is putting our extensive collection online,” she reports, “and I am working part time and writing the cozy mystery column for Mystery Scene magazine.”

1982

James F. Ginley, Littleton, Colorado, and his wife celebrated their 31st in July, with a daughter’s wedding 10 days later. Jim’s management consulting company works with water and wastewater utilities in the U.S. on organizational assessments, strategic planning, performance improvement and benchmarking.

1982

Frederick D. Goodman teaches biology and coaches cross country and track in West Hartford, Connecticut. “In what may come as a surprise to my Delta Phi brothers,” he writes, “I have served as chair of the science department at the Kingswood Oxford School for the past eight years. One of my notable students was Myles H. Alderman III ’14, son of our fellow graduate.”

1982

Thomas A. Grimes, Pennington, New Jersey, dropped off son Jackson F. Grimes ’22 for his freshman year in September. “We’re very excited and looking forward to getting back out to campus!”

1982

Frances H. “Corky” Hebert explained how she runs a flower-arranging business from the comfort of her Maryland garage: “The opportunity just kind of presented itself, so here I am, five years later.” She’s still in real estate and singing in a few groups.

1982

Catherine (Kemmerer) Karp has been involved in a research project at Boston College for three years that explores the Studio Habits of Mind approach to elementary art classrooms. She collaborates with the researchers, focusing on qualitative assessment and motivation. “I have been teaching art for almost 20 years and love every minute of it!” she adds.

1982

Diane Gross Leifer kept busy during election season “working to turn Arizona into a purple state,” she informs. “Got my real estate license and would gladly help anyone interested in exploring the Phoenix/Scottsdale area for investment opportunities or for those golden years.”

1982

Rory D. Mach is “cheerfully watching his skin turn leathery in the southern California sun,” he updates. This year marks 30 years of “blissful” marriage to Margaret C. Chapin ’81. Son Ryan Chapin Mach ’14 relocated from Brooklyn to Los Angeles, while daughter Katherine M. Mach ’17 lives in Philadelphia, which “in no way precludes her parents from annoying her from afar,” he notes.

1982

Paul F. Mathews, Hoffman Estates, Illinois, met up with Anthony C. Wood ’76 in early March to help harvest maple syrup. Attendance with Tony and Laurie at Cincinnati’s annual Bock Fest will be repeated next year, he promises.

1982

Daniel M. Mechem is executive vice president at Positron VR, which provides premium cinematic VR in conjunction with major movie studios in Los Angeles. “I recently had the pleasure of meeting and working with Steven Spielberg,” he writes. Daniel also collaborated on electronic dance music with singer Lana Del Rey and a remix for KISS.

1982

Elise A. Rafuse returned to Ottawa from a “professionally and personally rewarding posting” at the Canadian Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. She was deputy head for global affairs. Now she’s intensively studying Portuguese in preparation for her forthcoming three-year posting with Global Affairs Canada to Maputo, Mozambique.

1982

Peter S. Resnik, Louisville, Kentucky, and his wife, Lisa Betson Resnik ’89 caught up with freshman year Mather hallmates Clifford L. Birnbaum and Stephen F. Hale for tastings at Schlafly Beer in St. Louis, where Stephen is founding brewer.

1983

Douglas B. Dowd, in his 26th academic year at Washington University in St. Louis, recently published “Stick Figures: Drawing as a Human Practice.” In addition to his studio art and draw-ing, he has helped develop an extensive collection in the history of illustration.

1983

Audrey L. Kinter, Bethesda, Maryland, informs that her husband and mother both died in 2013. “Tough, sad and got me thinking about how short life is,” she writes. She retired from the National Institutes of Health in 2017 and splits time between the D.C. area and her off-grid Vermont cabin in summer with her three rescue dogs.

1983

Amy McCloskey and her husband run Madame X, a bar on Houston Street in New York City. Her husband’s Foundation for Investigative Reporters is bringing in grant money and in 2019 will produce “excellent examples of long-form journalism.” Amy spent time with Gwen A. Kreager in North Carolina for the fourth year at her Log Cabin on the Hill and its “views to die for,” she reports. Staying in her Brooklyn guest room this year were Christine A. Parini ’86, Jocelyn B. Hardman ’87 and Ellen Leerburger ’86. “The purple is strong out here in Brooklyn!” she cheers.

1984

Gail (Cleveland) Hamel uses her Kenyon degree every day in her business educating audiences about Colonial history along Boston’s Freedom Trail, in Lexington and Concord, and on van tours of historic sites.

1984

Jeanne Maine Top and Franklin H. Top III, Lincolnshire, Illinois, celebrated their 30th anniversary in May. “We have become an all-Kenyon family,” she writes, with their children Justin M. Top ’14 and Emily K. Top ’17 now graduated.

1984

Craig J. Richardson looks forward to bringing Cathy, his wife, to Kenyon for the first time, along with sisters Jan M. Richardson ’85 and Pamela (Richardson) Rivers ’89. In addition to teaching economics at Winston-Salem State University, Craig is founding director of its Center for the Study of Economic Mobility. “Recent travels to Zimbabwe, Vietnam and Portland, Oregon, have been great fun,” he updates. “I saw Reid W. Click ’83 recently in D.C.”

1984

Jonathan E. Tazewell is directing an original feature film during his sabbatical leave. He’s collaborating on “Gotta Get Down To It” with Kenyon students, several alumni and his department colleagues.

1985

“Two heart attacks in two years. Back to cardiac rehab. My position as liturgical officer for the United Methodist Church was eliminated, along with all benefits. So I’m on my wife’s Episcopal Church medical plan now, and have become part of the Ask The UMC team at United Methodist Communications. Quite an upheaval since spring.”

The Rev. Taylor W. Burton-Edwards, Columbus, Georgia

1985

Richmond H. Curtiss was inducted into the sports Hall of Fame at his high school, the Kiski School in western Pennsylvania, for his role as one of seven core members of a history-making cross-country team. “After 40 years it was great to be back, to be recognized and to see my teammates,” he writes. Back home in Palm Springs, California, he is training to be an off-road Jeep guide for a company that runs tours of the desert and the San Andreas fault. “Unfortunately,” Rick explains, “the job will put me in almost daily contact with wild rattlesnakes, a definite downside. I’m still together with my boyfriend Mark after 12 years, and we are very happy.”

1985

Anne P. Downey described her first year as an empty-nester: “While some parents relish the extra time, space and freedom, I do not. I prefer a full, messy, noisy house, and the years of raising my kids have been my best so far.” So she’s founded a startup, Luminta, a “hybrid tech-service business that uses real persons — trusted and talented designers — to cull and correct digital photos and create individualized hardcover photo books.”

1985

Joel F. Holmes Jr. and his wife love living in London: “We just finished walking the length of the Thames River,” he updates, a 184-mile journey that took two years to complete. Joel went fishing with James S. Ennis and Scott C. Alpers in May off Great Abaco in the Bahamas with his and Jim’s sons.

1985

Alfred G. Naddaff leads the sales team at Audi’s new Westwood location in suburban Boston, the No. 1 franchise in the region. His son, a senior at Davidson College, had his crisis reporting published in the Washington Post. “Had a great visit to Berkeley recently courtesy of Samuel L. Taylor, Mark T. Mashaw and Filippo P. Freccia.”

1985

Jan M. Richardson met up this summer in Massachusetts with Colleen Murphy Bell, Suzanne M. Powell, Tracey L. (Nash) Salinas, Karen A. Mombello and Emily M. Resnik Conn for some college touring: “I think we agreed our alma mater is still the best choice.”

1985

Stephen T. Webster, Grand Haven, Michigan, hiked the Canadian Rockies with his children this summer but misses having them around now that all three are in college. They skied Steamboat this winter. “They still enjoy taking trips with us … probably because we are paying,” he offers. “Met up with Joseph J. “Jay” Cobau. Always great to catch up and reminisce over a beer.”

1986

Simon G. Burrell welcomed to London Charles D. “Cully” Stimson, who traveled to see his son’s choir perform in various cathedrals around the country. Robert S. Bridges, Jr. popped over, too, as Rob was singing at St. Paul’s Cathedral at evensong with his choir from Christ Church Greenwich.

1986

Virginia L. Fitzgerald, Natick, Massachusetts, had her sculpture “dear jeff…” accepted into the collection of the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York City. “This piece is part of a body of a work I call my ‘dressproject,’” she explains. Commissioned by Jeff Gonski, who lost his fiancée in the events of 9/11, it was created with all the letters and memories he had been saving around the time of the 10th anniversary of the attack.

1986

Paulo E. Franco Jr. recently released new songs with his band, the Freightliners.

1986

Bradley D. Hazelrigg left Facebook and now helps “save the world from ‘clean coal’ at my new position with SunPower, the country’s largest solar energy company. Looking forward to having Elizabeth S. Leik come out for a San Francisco visit.”

1986

Meghan E. Regan-Loomis reports she had “so much fun returning to Gambier last spring to teach a class on Book IX of ‘Paradise Lost’ in Roy Rhodes’ and Miriam Dean-Otting’s classroom. That opportunity and having a legacy (Katherine H. Regan-Loomis ’21) have brought my Kenyon experience full circle so movingly.”

1986

Ruth Jane Staveley and Jan Edward Klamar ’84 celebrated their wedding over alumni weekend with numerous Kenyon family and friends, including Jan Lanier Mead, Beth Harkins Miller, Randall W. Mikes and Elizabeth Lukens Mikes, John Douglas Miller ’87, Andrew A. Folkerth ’84, Don W. DeVere II ’84 and Paul W. McCartney ’84.

1986

Robert J. Zaiser, Glen Gardner, New Jersey, enjoys returning to the Hill when visiting his oldest son Andrew W. Zaiser ’20.

1987

Stephanie L. Abbajay, St. Louis, has ghostwritten a memoir that was optioned to become a movie (details later!) and is now devoting more time to running David Stine Furniture, now in its 20th year. Her company won Best in Show in Sustainable Design at the 2018 Architectural Digest Design Show in New York. Recent travels included visits with Joseph E. Lipscomb, Ed Wood, Robin Zapler Goodstein, Ann C. Davies, Mary E. Abbajay ’86, E.W. “Gentry” Sayad ’86, Michael A. Mazzocone ’86, E. Elizabeth Walker and others.

1987

Christopher J. Eigeman lives in a Brooklyn apartment “that Linda (Djerejian Eigeman) calls a ‘jewel box,’ but she says it through gritted teeth,” he updates. “I was in Toronto a lot of the year making a film for Netflix called ‘Seven in Heaven.’ It’s on Netflix now.”

1987

Jocelyn B. (Kenton) Hardeman, Yellow Springs, Ohio, updates: “I have been volunteering for the Refugee Resettlement Program in Dayton through Catholic Social Services as an ESL tutor, but the number of refugees the U.S. is accepting has been drastically cut, despite the record numbers of people forcibly displaced from their homes globally.” This fall she went back to school as a student of documentary filmmaking in Barcelona, which “doesn’t suck,” she added.

1987

“After 15 years in Chicago and helping build a high school, I have accepted a call as the head of school for North Valley Christian Academy in Phoenix. It’s thrilling to return to the warm weather and desert lifestyle.”

E. Christian Schoenleb, Chicago, Illinois

1987

James K. Sokol, San Francisco, still loves working at a community nonprofit and growing a cultural arts trips program. “In 2019,” he writes, “I’ll lead trips to Broadway, Santa Fe, Morocco, Berlin, Eastern Europe, a Danube cruise and more! What’s not to love about sharing the world with people?”

1988

Lawrence J. Apke, Burlingame, California, spent last year creating a nonprofit called the Job Hackers that trains the unemployed on Agile and Scrum at no charge and helps place them in meaningful work. “Our last Agile M.B.A. class had 107 people enroll,” Larry notes.

1988

Margaret White Bellefuil, Seattle, enjoyed a mini-reunion with five of her Mather and Caples roommates: Diana Olinger, Shelly Rankin, Jean Bayless Albrecht, Noel Chappelear Rodgers and Jodi Campbell. “Some of us had not seen each other in 28 years,” Margaret writes. “Hurricane Florence prevented Jodi from making it to Ohio but she joined us via Skype.”

1988

cdavid cottrill, Portland, Oregon, did a music video for John Carter Cash set post-Civil War, “complete with cowboys and a hanging,” he writes. He also ran the props department on a new Hulu series called “Shrill” starring Aidy Bryant of “Saturday Night Live”: “The half-hour comedy has a storyline based loosely on the memoir by Lindy West, who wrote for years on a Seattle alt-weekly.”

1988

J. Mark Eberman, Silver Spring, Maryland, received a kidney transplant in May. “Everything is going better than we could have hoped,” he reports, “and I feel amazing. I also met up this spring with housemates Daniel Tobin and Daniel G. Rudmann, who appear not to have changed a bit in the nearly 30 years since I last saw them.”

1988

Bruce A. Gerber, Worthington, Ohio, returned to Gambier for Homecoming with Kent Wellington and Edward W. “Ted” Stewart and enjoyed seeing Nathanael J. Henry ’20, son of Mark D. Henry, force a fumble on a quarterback sack for the Lords. That evening at the Hall of Fame banquet, Kent received the Donald May Award honoring accomplished athletes who have performed creditably and honorably in their careers. “Well-deserved,” Bruce writes.

1988

Melissa J. (Henderson) Koenig is now director of instructional technology at DePaul University. She is head coach of the speedskating team in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, and competes in the masters division. “While I did not defend my national short-track title this past March, I enjoyed skating with some amazing folks, including a four-time Olympian.”

1988

Janet E. Lord, Baltimore, welcomes the spring graduation of daughter Lynne A. Cullen ’19. “I was so sorry to have missed the reunion, especially as I missed the surprising but very delightful award from the Kenyon College Alumni Association for my humanitarian work. I continue to work in some fascinating places and look forward to serving as Amnesty International USA’s vice chair in the coming year.”

1988

Paul B. Singer, Boston, became investigations editor for WGBH News and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting. So far, Paul has appeared precisely once on the front page of the Boston Globe, “in a photo of people holding up K’s to track strikeouts at Fenway.”

1988

Kristi (McCauley) Sink misses North Carolina but is enjoying seeing Kenyon T-shirts now that she lives in Cleveland. “I have the wonderful opportunity of serving as the president of University Hospitals Elyria Medical Center. Our family continues to recover from the loss of our son Logan. Our sincere thanks to those who have reached out with prayers and support.”

1988

Beth (Miyashiro) Vivio, St. Petersburg, Florida, updates that son Carter M. Vivio ’21 has declared a modern languages and literature major. She and her husband bought Corporate Fitness Works, a fitness center management company serving a broad range of industries, including Fortune 100 companies, government entities, hospitals and residential facilities.

1988

Virginia E. Warner, Livingston, Montana, was promoted to a position in the office of the superintendent of Yellowstone National Park. “I can’t believe it’s been 28 years since my first National Park Service job and 27 years since my first summer in Yellowstone.”

1989

Margaret Alexander has been “reinventing her life,” she updates: “Met a wonderful man, bought a new house, and moved in with him and his two children” in addition to her newly teenage daughter. She is still with the Eugene (Oregon) Public Library after 15 years.

1989

Joan O’Hanlon Curry is almost one year into a new job at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as the administrative director for pediatric clinical services in Houston. Because she still flies back to New York for weekends with her family, she is enjoying frequent upgrades.

1989

Abbe Jacobson was elected to the Kenyon Alumni Council and is excited to reconnect with ’89ers in that role. An empty-nester, she’s finding it fun, meanwhile continuing fulfilling work as a life and health coach.

1989

Ann E. Minner is a managing librarian for the Austin Public Library and teaches children’s literature at UT Austin. As their son navigates his senior year of high school, she and her husband “observe with teary-eyed wonder and advise when we can.”

1989

Heidi Lodish Steinert and Eric C. Steinert, Belmont, Massachusetts, are enjoying campus visits to daughter Emma R. Steinert ’21, who happens to be a third-generation Kenyonite, taking after Heidi’s father, Harvey F. Lodish ’62.

1990s

1990

Dirk A. Beamer and Jessica Becker Beamer ’92, Farmington, Michigan, are officially empty-nesters, with children at Loyola Chicago, Calvin College and now Grinnell. “Who remembered that the house could be so clean?”

1990

Julia Griner has had “an intense year here in Rome.” With the cooking school up and running, she is making fresh pasta by hand, pizza and pastries but needs a vacation.

1990

Julia Muggia Ochs was recently elected to a five-year term on the Board of Education of the City School District of New Rochelle, New York. She recently spent “quality time” with Sarah (Watts) Beneke, Jessica (Hart) Selden and Melissa (Uhlig) Wright.

1990

John L. Thurber, East Lansing, Michigan, made his first pilgrimage to the Baseball Hall of Fame with William J. O’Hearn.

1991

Tracey A. Fatzinger, Glen Allen, Virginia, sent her eldest off to Georgia Tech. “Our weekly video calls,” she reports, “are a far cry from Kenyon and finding a note on your whiteboard that your parents called. I was tickled, however, that he has a P.O. box that looks remarkably similar to the ones at Kenyon!”

1991

Holly Hatch-Surisook loved the gathering hosted by Angelique Tober last spring in Colorado with dear friends Sarah E. Phemister, Ann P. Russell and Michelle Van Etten Lee. The group missed Chelsea M. Guillen and Melanie Carlos that weekend. Holly’s Thai restaurant in Minneapolis celebrated its first decade, and she has opened a second: Dipped and Debris, classic American sandwiches and frozen custard.

1991

Christopher Kaufman Ilstrup began work as the executive director of the Vermont Humanities Council, which runs programs like Vermont Reads.

1991

Megan Lewis-Schurter earned tenure at UMass Amherst and spent her sabbatical circumnavigating the globe with Semester at Sea. She traveled 26,000 miles, visited 15 countries and took in theater and other performances in every port.

1991

Christopher A. Mitchell and his fiancée moved from Ann Arbor to Grand Rapids, Michigan, before the pair were married in June by kilted classmate M. Douglas Campbell. Kenyon attendees included bow tie-wearing Rob Broeren.

1992

Alise Shuart Barrett was married on Aug. 7 in Gaylord, Michigan. Attending were Margaret Stevenson Vines, Joyce Y. Tecson Chapman, Elizabeth W. Owen Walker, Carolyn Shepard Fox, Elizabeth Jennings Lockwood ’90 and William B. Lockwood ’91, and her youngest sister Kate-Robin Shuart ’04. Alise adds, “I of course chose purple as my color.”

1992

Kathryn D. Blanchard was “feeling a little stale after 12 years of full-time teaching at Alma College” in Michigan, she reports, so she went back to school. Having recently passed her first managerial accounting midterm in Central Michigan University’s online M.B.A. program, she writes: “Who knows — I might be done before leaving age 50!”

1992

Michael S. Dow splits his week between his home in western Massachusetts and his mother’s house in Andover. “On Fridays, I host ‘Civil Politics’ on Valley Free Radio. As the name suggests, we attempt to discuss politics with civility, but that gets more difficult when one party rejects the very idea of letting the other side take a turn.”

1992

Heather S. (Ahlburn) Emerick had a “harrowing” summer, she reports: “At the end of April, my kids and I were unexpectedly evacuated from our home in Managua, Nicaragua, due to the deteriorating political situation. My husband, considered essential embassy personnel, stayed behind.” When that separation extended to five months, “We sadly made the decision to curtail the assignment. A post opened in Argentina, and here we are in Buenos Aires. Happy to be here, but constantly thinking about our friends in Nicaragua and the challenges they face.”

1992

Kristin Holzer Fischer, Albany, California, is doing HR/leadership development work at an international nonprofit and, with Matthew A. Fischer ’91, keeping their daughters, 13 and 17, moving in the right direction.

1992

Rachel (Schwartz) Louis sent greetings from Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. Rachel was finishing a three-week tour of Central Asia to promote the academic program she works for, which trains public-sector economists from developing countries. “I was pleasantly surprised that tucked somewhere deep in my brain was that college Russian I learned so many years ago.”

1992

Douglas D. Mott moved to the coast of Maine about a decade ago, bought some sheep and started an organic wild blueberry business. He keeps up with Robert F. Voth, Carolyn Peticolas ’93, Karl Slatoff, Elizabeth S. Shreve, Thomas D. Creech ’89 and Hodding Carter III ’84, “to name a few,” he adds.

1992

Margaret Neff-Nicklas shares that a time-capsule letter she wrote predicting she would be teaching by 2017 has come true: She’s now an adjunct professor at Long Island University teaching luxury branding for the College of Management.

1992

Joseph L. Rife directs Vanderbilt University’s Program in Classical and Mediterranean Studies. He teaches, researches, runs excavations in Greece and Israel and, back home in Nashville, enjoys the good life with his family, including at their new cabin in the Smoky Mountains.

1992

Elizabeth S. Shreve, Washington, D.C., honored Carrie M. Nealon by delivering her citation when she was inducted into Kenyon’s Athletic Hall of Fame for her swimming achievements. “Carrie and her wonderful family and our close friend Karl Slatoff had a fabulous weekend,” she notes.

1992

Lainie Thomas, Manila, Philippines, changed jobs at the Asian Development Bank and now works on a team supporting civil society engagement across Asia and the Pacific.

1993

Melissa Wood Brewster and her family are living in Spain this year, “immersing ourselves in a different culture and learning a new language,” she informs. “Lots to adjust to and learn!” Read her travel blog at brewcrewabroad.com.

1993

Jennifer A. Carter, Newtown, Connecticut, reports she “had a blast” visiting Gwyndolyn E. Harrison ’94 in Bridgewater, Virginia, on a camping trip with the college swim team Gwynn coaches.

1993

Matt Ferrari was recently honored to serve as chapter chair of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the Young Presidents’ Organization after serving as education chair. He is also a reader in the Greek Orthodox Church, a cohort of Leadership Pittsburgh, a Vistage member and a newly avid pickleball player.

1993

Kristin Iversen lives in Westchester County, New York, and updates that she is kept busy “at supersonic speed” by her daughter (10) and son (7). She has worked in oncology research and clinical trials for 23 years, the last 10 from home as a clinical quality lead for a large pharmaceutical company. In the bin are a marathon, half Ironman and endless half-marathons — a ToughMudder is next.

1993

Christopher H. Parsons lives in western North Carolina, where, after two decades in academic medicine he has started an infectious-diseases program with the UNC system in an underserved community. Chris’ oldest is a college junior; a son works with Chef Ripert at Le Bernadin in Manhattan; and their youngest — “fortunately” — is still at home.

1993

“Some strange spell. Pulling up to McBride and Rebecca C. Reimbold and I moving our son Logan Thomas ’22 into the same room I shared with John D. Clark and David C. Allen a few years back. And within 10 days he’s a Chamber Singer, Koke and playing Ultimate Frisbee. Can you say deja vu? Now he just needs to play volleyball, edit Worldly Wisdom and campaign for world peace!”

Bryon W. Thomas

1994

Julian L. Boxenbaum, South Orange, New Jersey, and his wife celebrated the birth of daughters Stella and Matilda on July 10, 2017. “Read ‘old dad,’” he adds. “Because that wasn’t enough change, I simultaneously took a new job leading the New York office for the strategic-design firm that designed the original Apple retail program and stores. After a year of three hours of sleep a night, I am now recovering nicely.”

1994

Marshall W. Chapin reports that “Bailey, 12, danced on Broadway this summer, and Campbell is 10 and loving soccer.” He’s working on a project for a large private equity firm, “helping them figure out the electric utility/distributed energy resources space — electric vehicles, wind/solar, batteries. Fun stuff.” It’s his last year as a Kenyon trustee.

1994

Laura L. Copeland lives in Toronto, Canada, with her boys, 12 and 8. “I’m retired from emergency medicine and Humber River Hospital. I am now the chief medical information officer for Healthtech and a practicing medical psychotherapist specializing in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.”

1994

L. Bradford Hughes still practices law in Columbus, Ohio, chairing Porter Wright’s appellate practice. Brad recently enjoyed a return to the Hill for 25th reunion planning and to see roommate Scott C. Sherman inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame.

1994

Katharine G. (Weiser) Macdonnell lives outside Raleigh, North Carolina, with her husband, two daughters (17 and 14) and an 11-year-old son. Kate is an admission director at Sylvan Learning Center. She keeps in touch with Stephen C. Collins and Fiona (Wallace) Collins, Catherine V. Haight and Mischi Carter. “I wish I had known how cool and interesting everyone was back when we were in college,” she adds.

1994

Scott C. Sherman, Chicago, started his 20th year in the emergency department at the county hospital, and is assistant baseball coach for his boys, 11 and 8.

1995

Edward B. Bierhaus, Golden, Colorado, is on the team of NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission (asteroidmission.org), which approached asteroid Bennu in November and began surveying it up close “after many years of development during proposal, design and build phases and launch in 2016,” he informs. “We built the spacecraft, and I’m the lead scientist for the sampling system, which I helped design and test,” Beau wrote in late September. He’s also involved in NASA’s Lucy mission to explore multiple Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which should happen in 2033 — the year his first-grader Helen graduates from college. “Oh, my thudding head,” he adds.

1995

Elizabeth E. (Worrell) Newsom, Parker, Colorado, reports that she walked a mile without stopping! “While this may seem small,” she explains, “there was a time when I could only walk 30 feet and mostly used a wheelchair. Against all odds, my wheelchair mostly stays in the car these days. I walk with my walker most places I go. I feel very thankful that a medication has helped me to walk, write and in general live again.”

1995

Adam F. Tucker became city attorney of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. During eight years there, he has represented the city in litigation defense and policy guidance.

1996

Matthew J. Friedman, Millbury, Massachusetts, celebrated as son Elijah D. Friedman ’22 arrived on campus. “It was a surreal feeling unloading the car and moving him into his McBride dorm for orientation,” Matt notes.

1996

Joseph F. Herban marked his 13th year as a Columbus Realtor. He was recently inducted into Berkshire Hathaway’s Leadership Society (the top 7 percent of the company nationwide) and is one of only six certified luxury sales agents in central Ohio. Joe hangs out with Michael H. “Mihi” Schuermeyer and Joshua H. Cornehlsen a few times a year; they are partners in a real estate investment company.

1996

Gerald Kelly has been managing construction of the new English Cottage and Keithley House at the Kenyon English Quad. Jerry is again teaching a class in solar electric systems with Professor Eric Holdener and Ryan Hottle, manager of the Kenyon Farm, site of the first campus solar installation. He is currently completing book projects with Peter Rutkoff, Susan Rothenberg, Fred Andrle and Steven Schaefer — “with valued assistance from Kaitlin R. Tebeau ’12,” he adds.

1996

Kathryn A. Knudson and her sister were honored this summer by designation of their family farm as a Minnesota Sesquicentennial Farm. “It’s been in our family since 1868,” she informs. In September, she had a flash fiction piece published in Blink-Ink, the same publication that nominated her writing for a Pushcart Prize a few years ago.

1996

Lauren Star Coplan MacKay and her family moved from Newtown, Massachusetts, to Los Angeles this summer after husband Tyler A. Studds ’98 got a job in offshore wind energy. Lauren is now at Loyola Marymount working on a master’s in yoga studies, “the only academic degree offered in yoga in the country,” she notes. “A deep dive into the essence of yoga — namaste!”

1996

Jane L. Roth still teaches Latin and English at a boarding school in St. Louis in what she calls “the bookends of 7th and 12th grades.” She adds: “Going back to school for a master’s in gifted education has both renewed my empathy for my students and confirmed my annoyance with ‘group work.’ It takes me back to my Psych 101 days at Kenyon!”

1996

Douglas A. Trafelet, London, U.K., and his wife have become “deeply involved in a sword-fighting club,” he reports. “It’s not just crude street fighting as you perhaps assumed! The land is rife with medieval history, and our workshops demand mental acuteness as we re-enact famous sieges from the mid-16th to late 17th centuries. I prefer the Bolognese sword and buckler while Libby carries a rapier and rotella. Comfortable shoes are a must!”

1997

Elizabeth Boon Carrico and her husband are on the faculty at Stony Brook University, in Long Island, New York. She was recently promoted to full professor and made director of the school’s NIH-funded chemical biology training program. Her children are ages 8, 4 and 2.

1997

Elizabeth Fletcher was elected to Congress. Lizzie won in Texas’ 7th Congressional District, comprising an area west of Houston, by beating 18-year incumbent John Culberson. President Sean Decatur told The Collegian that Fletcher is “a great example of an accomplished Kenyon alum who is making an interesting choice of how she can have an impact on her country, her community, so we are proud and excited and ready to cheer her on as she heads to Washington.”

1997

Aaron B. Webber, Norwich, U.K., started a genealogy company called Lamppost Lineage. “Always happy to see classmates,” he adds.

1998

Bret Andrews Berman, Lafayette, Colorado, was promoted to senior manager, integrated production, at Sterling-Rice Group in Boulder after seven years at the agency. Firstborn son Jack joined the family on Sept. 2.

1998

Maureen K. Foley is in her second year as an elected member of the school board of Carpinteria, California. She began closing her jam and marmalade business, Red Hen Cannery, and took a job with the Unitarian Universalist Society of Santa Barbara. “I needed a change of life,” she explains, “after enduring six evacuations from the Thomas Fire and the terrible Jan. 9 mudslide.

1998

Gregory W. Foster moved to San Diego and finds that “Everything is good in the hot sauce world. I’ve successfully defended my Guinness World Record for eating the most Carolina Reaper peppers in one minute,” he reports. In April, he will try to break it at the NYC Hot Sauce Expo. He was cheered on in a Chicago competition by Lindsey (Yurgine) Hoffman ’00. “Stay spicy!”

1998

Mark H. Goodrich earned tenure at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, where he is associate professor of computer science. His first sabbatical has involved “diving deep into game design research projects and professional development,” he updates, “and spending more time with my wife, 3-year-old son, two cats and three chickens.”

1998

Rachel L. Grossman, Washington, D.C., is involved in several projects: co-producing the JUBILEE, a nationwide theater festival in 2020, as well as the Deaf Theatre Action Planning Session with HowlRound in March 2019. She is also “mentoring arts leaders in the U.S. and U.K. as they embark on journeys of organizational change, grounded in diversity and inclusion.”

1998

R. Joy (Wright) Hammond married Robert Wright on Sept. 1, with Dartesia A. “Dotty” Pitts ’00 serving as a bridesmaid.

1998

Elizabeth M. Lonky, Hawthorne, California, has a dual career as a longtime photographer and brand-new speech therapist covering the entire caseload at Bud Carson Middle School in the LA area. “I work with amazing kiddos,” she explains, “who have moderate to severe autism, language delays and other learning challenges.” Busy also with her kids, now 10 and 5, “I am just fine with having no spare time.”

1998

J. Brooks Martin and Maggie J. (Fielding) Martin ’00 moved to LA from Maryland four years ago. Global digital creative director for Marriott International, Brooks is “recovering” from the merger of Marriott and Starwood hotels. He made it to the reunion “with special thanks and a ride from Brian C. Eiler, as well as the much-needed nudging of Ian H. Schwab, Clark R. Nelson and Jonathan E. Keeling.”

1998

Meredith C. Moore became a board member of the Philander Chase Conservancy a year ago. “Many of you may remember fondly Lisa D. (Jeanne) Schott ’80, who worked in admissions,” she writes. “She is the head of this amazing organization that is working to preserve the beauty, family farms and natural habitats of the area surrounding the College.”

1998

Hebron I. Simckes-Joffe, Pasadena, California, won grand prize for best dramatic script at the Arthouse Urban Film Fest as well as at iHolly Fest. He was an official selection at the Sacramento International Film Fest and more than 10 other festivals since last year. His first feature film recently premiered at the Horror Hotel Film Fest, where it won third prize for Best Thriller/Horror feature before it screened at the Chicago Horror Film Festival.

1998

Cameron P. Sterling, Greenwich, Connecticut, works with businesses and photographers to help them with visual branding and strategy. His two boys, 5 and 1, keep him and his wife busy.

1998

Amy (Todd) Thomas is in private practice as an OB-GYN in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Daughters Leah (10) and Lauren (7) visited Kenyon last year and have decided they want to attend! Amy writes that she “is nearing the end of a four-year-long divorce and looking forward to regaining her freedom.” In November, she competed in Dancing with the Fort Wayne Stars, a fundraiser. She is excited to be dancing again: “The last time was senior year at Kenyon.”

1998

Neil D. Turner is newly married and living in New Orleans. “Great conference destination,” he writes, so frequent get-togethers with alums have been a pleasure.

1999

Michael F. Armey was promoted to associate professor (research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He was named associate director of the newly formed Consortium for Research Innovation in Suicide Prevention.

1999

Lee D. Fuoco, a licensed clinical social worker since 2010, is moving from community mental health work to her own private practice, with a clinical interest in people on the LGBTQIA spectrum and specializing in gender transition. She lives north of Boston with her two children (7 and 5).

1999

Kamille A. (Johnson) Harless, Smyrna, Georgia, completed a year on Kenyon’s Alumni Council and now will serve as its vice president.

1999

Christopher A. Junkin, a busy architect, just broke ground on a new athletic center for the Spence School. “Life in Brooklyn with wife Doro and son Anders is lots of fun.”

1999

Erica L.V. (Vogelei) Kendall, San Carlos, California, had a third child in May: Nicholas joins his two sisters and “is as sweet as can be,” she informs.

1999

Andrew D. Lebkuecher sends greetings from Beijing, where he and Alys L. Spensley ’01 serve in the U.S. Embassy. He works on U.S.-China economic issues, and Alys serves as deputy spokesperson. “Our kids — Catherine and Louise (both 6) and AJ (3) — are having a great time, growing up fast and learning Chinese at an amazing speed.”

1999

“We are brokenhearted to announce the death of our 5-year-old son, Bennett Charles McClurken-Gibney, who died suddenly Feb. 28. Bennett was an amazing ray of light who made the world a better place. He loved to play, but in his wheelchair playgrounds were often inaccessible. To honor his memory and the way in which he brought communities together, we have started Bennett’s Village, dedicated to bringing an all-abilities playground to Charlottesville, Virginia, and to advocate for inclusivity through play. If you would like to help or learn more, please see bennettsvillage.org.”

Kara M. McClurken and Brian P. Gibney, Charlottesville, Virginia

1999

Zachary B. Nowak earned his Harvard Ph.D. in American studies in May. He’s a college fellow in Harvard’s History Department, teaching environmental and food history.

1999

Emily L. (Minshew) Reese has been a licensed acupuncturist for a decade and recently completed her functional medicine training before opening a new office for integrative functional and Chinese medicine in Oakland, California. Busy with two boys, 8 and 5, Emily met up this year with Alison A. Garrison ’00 and “got to talk about kids and babies,” she writes.

1999

Katherine V. (Vorda) Schwab, Seattle, enjoyed time back on the Hill in September with Marisha Stawiski Holter, Karen J. Schell, John R. Scherck and Sally Ann Elliott Boyle.

1999

Bruno D. Trindade is “loving life in western Massachusetts with my wife and two kids, 8 and 4,” he writes. He is now VP of engineering for Qeepsake, a text-messaging baby journal featured on “Shark Tank” last year. “On the side I have been teaching martial-arts classes and fixing up old motorbikes,” he adds.

2000s

2000

Sarah Scott Brett welcomed a daughter, Miriam, in January 2018. Big brothers James (6) and William (3) are “in love.” Sarah separated from the Air Force and started a fellowship in hospice and palliative medicine just south of Pittsburgh.

2000

Scott G. Carney and his wife released “Wild Thing,” a podcast about Sasquatch, science and society. They also built a guesthouse behind their home, which finally means they have some space to put friends up when they come through Denver.

2000

Kurt M. Cross and his wife welcomed second daughter Nadiya Parvathi Cross to the family in May. First-grader Kareena plays lots of tennis. Kurt works in investment banking at Morgan Stanley in the Los Angeles office, covering consumer retail companies.

2000

Kelly P. Dillon is meeting success researching media effects and cyberbullying at Wittenberg University. Her latest work, “Effects of exposure to gun violence in movies on children’s interest in real guns,” published in JAMA Pediatrics, “reached a major milestone in news coverage, citations and downloads,” she reports. She and her family (sons 11 and 9) are enjoying a new home in Grove City, Ohio.

2000

“Overjoyed to report that my husband and I gave birth to our ‘miracle’ baby, Nickolas Anthony, on Sept. 14. We had been waiting to adopt for a year and a half and unable to get pregnant since marrying nearly four years ago.”

Kathleen S. Florea, Kingman, Arizona

2000

Geoffrey A. Long completed his Ph.D. in media arts and practice at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. “Since my research is on developing transmedia storyworlds,” Geoff explains, “my final project was over 1,200 illustrated pages of screenplay, graphic novel script, novella chapters, design docs, and a how-to manuscript that will be my first academic book.” He also serves as a visiting assistant professor at Whittier College.

2000

Kevin S. McFadden, Buffalo, New York, had a big year musically: In January he released his eighth full-length album, “Bethlehem is Burning,” by the Hathaway Family Plot, a story “based around the massive fire that erupted in a former steel factory near Buffalo the morning after Trump’s election.” Next, he collaborated with the French musician Monplaisir on “A Tape Full of Mistakes”; May saw an album release under that moniker.

2000

Meredith J. Methlie, Philadelphia, is “happy to report that the ladies of Bexley 109 are in the same town again! Gwendolyn A. Beetham moved here last summer, joining Selamawit Gilagaber and me.” Meredith and Gwendolyn work two blocks apart, both for the School of Arts and Sciences at Penn.

2000

Jennifer Kozak Rawlings celebrated a set of 40th birthdays in Austin with Julia L. Beynon Pettus, Caryn C. Cuthbert Winkler and Anne M. Smetak. “We left behind 10 children, ranging from ages 3 to 10, and enjoyed hiking, cooking together, a spa day and listening to hits of the ’90s,” she describes. “It was all very sophisticated, much like the days at 100 Duff Street.”

2000

Michael J. Tabacco practices healthcare law in D.C. and Maryland. He founded a Blockchain-based company to streamline health insurance payments to physicians, and his team received its first large-sum investment this summer.

2000

Caleb H. Wheeler and his wife live in London, U.K., after completing their doctorates in international law and taking positions as lecturers at Middlesex University. Caleb’s first book, “The Right to Be Present at Trial in International Criminal Law,” was just published.

2000

John A. Zahl accepted a call to become the 13th rector of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Bedford, New York. “We made the move up from Charleston, South Carolina, in August,” he notes.

2001

Emily A. (Guy) Birken, Milwaukee, was named best freelance writer of the year by the Plutus Awards, which celebrate excellence in personal finance media.

2001

Christopher W. Filson teaches science in suburban Denver and participated in the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Teachers last summer at the Colorado School of Mines, researching the tension between water and energy in the West.

2001

Jada R. Twedt Strabbing welcomed a third child, son Declan, to the family on Nov. 15, 2017. Jada is a tenured philosophy professor at Wayne State University and, having bought a Detroit-area house, is close to extended family.

2002

Eleanna M. Anagnos is the Grant Wood Painting Fellow at the University of Iowa this year. Her debut solo exhibition opens in New York in April. In June she will be a Rauschenberg Foundation Fellow at the Rauschenberg estate in Captiva, Florida.

2002

Michael D. Bonomo and his wife live in Streetsboro, Ohio, and work at the Western Reserve Academy. This summer in Boulder he caught up with Conor J. Sheehy, Christian D. Brose, Jonathan L. Philipsborn ’03 and Flurry J. Stone ’04.

2002

Alexander S. “Sandy” Bryant is director of the annual fund at Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, New Hampshire, “thrilled to be back in New England” after four years in Tennessee.

2002

Russell A. Carleton published his first book in April, titled “The Shift: The Next Evolution in Baseball Thinking,” in which he “takes a deep look at how the human element of baseball can show itself through a close look at the numbers.”

2002

Lauren E. Coil-Sherck became science department chair at the Hawken School in Cleveland. She and John R. Sherck ’99 are thrilled for their girls, ages 8, 6, and 2, to be nearer to their Ohio grandparents.

2002

Brooke S. (Weizmann) Gast updates that after spending 15 years managing sustainability programs and partnerships for BASF and various industry associations, she has “finally got up the courage to strike out on my own” and start a consultancy.

2002

James J. Greenwood is in his second year of a doctoral program at Boston College and his third year working at Shady Hill School in Cambridge, Massachusetts — not to mention starting a term as Alumni Council president.

2002

Hilary L. Hodge and her husband, Antoine, moved to Paris, where they are “enjoying lots of delicious wine and cheese and trips to the countryside,” she reports.

2002

Stephanie S. (Spaulding) Hoffman entered the Pan American Masters Championship in Orlando, Florida, with her aunt, mother and sister — her first swim meet since high school, she writes. “With an average age of just under 55, we did better than expected and were in the top ten teams in our age range.”

2002

Marsely von Lengerke Kehoe directs the Mellon Scholars Program at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, working with arts and humanities students to develop research and digital humanities skills. “It’s been nice to step into administrative work while still teaching,” she explains. “I was able to visit Kenyon this summer for a workshop since Hope and Kenyon are both in the GLCA.”

2002

Emily E. (Duke) Long and her husband are enjoying life with 9-year-old twins, who have discovered a passion for swimming and hoverboards but “a serious dislike for everything math,” she reports. “My Detroit law practice is focused on trial work and criminal litigation.”

2002

Emily H. “Amy” Peterson left the sports world to become full-time CEO of a social enterprise she started five years ago called Rebel Nell (rebelnell.com). “I am up for the challenge and excited to impact the lives of more women in Detroit,” she writes.

2002

John C. Pitts reports that after almost seven years and “a fairly big leadership transition,” he has left the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to join Plaid as its policy lead. “Joining the world of fintech brings all sorts of changes,” he explains, “mostly fewer suits and more Patagonia vests. I’ll now be in San Francisco about a week out of every month. So hit me up if you are around. I’d love to have someone explain to me why Philz Coffee is a thing.”

2002

Robert W. “Winston” Sale reports his mind is blown every time his older daughter boards the bus for kindergarten: “Still working for the federal government, lately helping to wind down the savings and loan bailout financing corporation. Also involved in an app startup called FrameShot, so please download the app, and with luck I will eventually underwrite a Murray Residence Hall complete with Bunn Memorial Waterslide on the Hill.” A move this winter into his wife’s lovely childhood home in D.C. means a “legit guest room to host Kenyon friends.”

2002

Rebecca D. “Danielle” Strickland continues to teach and research at the National Pedagogical University and a maximum-security prison in Guadalajara, Mexico. “In August I co-facilitated the first certification course of the Inside-Out International Prison Exchange Program for professors in Latin America,” she writes. Daughters Dakota (4) and Savannah (2) are “growing up too fast,” she adds.

2003

“My son, Leo, was born May 17. He joins two-legged big sister Louisa and four-legged big sister Beans.”

Meghan E. Burnett, Philadelphia

2003

Mary E. Hanna-Weir updates: “After eight years at the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, the reality of presidential transition and five years of living in California, it was finally time to find a local job.” She’s now deputy counsel for Santa Clara County.

2003

Justin J. Marsico and Hannah C. Williams ’04 welcomed second child Claire to the family in D.C. “We look forward to when we can put that cute little purple Kenyon hat on her head.”

2003

Danielle N. Tandet married in April, with friends on the small guest list: Christopher A. Lentz ’04, Rachel J. (Ebner) Schwartz ’04 and Joanna (Jacobsen) Lloyd ’04. She became associate director of admissions and placement at the Gateway School in Manhattan, where “children with language-based learning disabilities and attention deficits thrive,” she writes.

2003

Sara (Markt) Whitmore and Russell H. Whitmore and their son, Ansel, welcomed daughter Lucinda to the family. “We still live in Brooklyn,” she writes. “Can’t believe it has been 15 years.” She works as a nurse practitioner; Russell runs his jewelry/antiques shop, Erie Basin.

2004

Mara D. Bernstein began working in development and fundraising at Indiana University this year. “My wife, Jada, and I visited Ireland and England for our honeymoon,” she shares. “Sarah Olivia-Fisher Wild, Ruth E. Crowell Wild ’02 and Karen E. (Hansen) Orr ’02 were amazing hosts!”

2004

Dawn C. (Sokolowski) Gardiner, Mentor, Ohio, describes new daughter Emily Anne as “a delight who currently enjoys rolling, cooing and sucking her thumb. Her brothers adore her.” Dawn home-schools the two boys and takes them on field trips. “The boys most enjoyed visiting a lab to see how Stone Age people made spear and arrowheads,” she reports.

2004

Leeman T. Kessler joined the Gambier Village Council after being elected in 2017. “A real honor,” he writes, “after returning to the Hill in 2015. Despite my new municipal duties, I continue to spend most of my time chasing around my children, who turn 1 and 5 this year, as well as working on my web series ‘Ask Lovecraft.’”

2004

Adam S. Lavitt married Alex Weissman on June 24, with Keith Nelson in attendance. “Alex and I enjoy living in Providence, Rhode Island,” he writes, “and I am loving serving as rabbi and chaplain at Hebrew Senior Life, and as a curricular consultant for a national Jewish educational organization, Moving Traditions.”

2004

Eric T. Lehrman updates that son Miles arrived in May and is doing great. “Theo is a terrific big brother.” Eric works at Wattpad, running its entertainment division in Los Angeles, where he often runs into junior-year roommate John “J.C.” Cangilla ’03, Michael P. McMahan, Brian A. Speiser ’05, Molly H. Mandel and Samie Kim Falvey ’96.

2004

Camille J. (McCaul) Matlack and Alexander D. Matlack ’05 celebrated the birth of son William Arthur on June 12. “He is everything our hearts imagined and more,” they write. “Robin C. McCarthy married Elias Heyns in July in their kitchen in Bucksport, Maine, without guests — “a decision that had nothing to do with how much they love their friends,” she assures. “Afterward, they ate dinner.”

2004

Caroline M. (Meyer) Omolesky and Matthew J. Omolesky live in Columbus, Ohio, with 4-year-old Vera and a dachshund, Magnus. Caroline has spent 10 years in the Office of International Affairs at Ohio State, working with international students, while Matt is in private law practice.

2004

Thomas C. Susman moved to Seattle in March after 12 years at the CIA in Washington, D.C., to become deputy director for global security at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He was married on Sept. 2. “A big year of change, but we are loving every minute,” Tom adds.

2004

Jessica L. Taylor, Cincinnati, is a clinical social worker practicing in northern Kentucky. Seeing both adults and adolescents, she treats mood and anxiety disorders, OCD and trauma, and greatly enjoys her practice. Son Augustus is 3; daughter Alessandra is 1.

2004

Grace Van Cleave writes that Des Moines, Iowa, will be home for years to come: She bought a house in August. “A beautifully renovated 1912 Craftsman, it is now home to me, my boyfriend, John, and our two rescue dachshunds.” Grace is senior director with Stella & Dot, working out of an upstairs finished attic office, “helping many of our former classmates look and feel like their stylish, confident, gorgeous selves.”

2004

Sarah (Meadow) Walsh is librarian for an independent pre-K-8 school northwest of D.C., working hard to learn student names. “But one of them is really easy,” she writes, “because it’s Ziva! Our little character just turned 5 and is loving her pre-K class and teacher.”

2005

Erin A. Carr married Suzanne Shrekgast in June in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Next was a January honeymoon in Vietnam. She took a “highly stressful but also extremely fun” job as assistant controller of the F&B side of the NoMad hotel in New York last summer, she reports.

2005

Meredith A. Farmer is an assistant teaching professor at Wake Forest but will be a fellow at the Smithsonian this spring.

2005

Becky L. Grajeda is now a wedding coordinator in Los Angeles (threadeventsco.com), continues to make art and caught up with Clair M.A. John ’03, Joshua H. Carrigan ’06, and Brian P. Long. With her boyfriend, job and two kittens, she reports, “I finally feel settled and happy.” On Oct. 6 she participated in a walk with her family for the Los Angeles National Alliance on Mental Illness: “Super-excited to support an organization that supported me when I needed it.”

2005

Samantha L. Hudgins moved to Rockville, Maryland, about a year ago and bought a veterinary practice with a longtime friend. “We are still working the kinks out but are enjoying the challenge of owning a business,” Sam updates. She is married, and her daughter is 2 1/2.

2005

Bethany R. Johns, Silver Spring, Maryland, reports two major life events: “I now work in science policy for the American Institute of Physics. Also, I had a son back in June 2016.”

2005

Emily E. King, San Francisco, writes that waiting 35 years to welcome a baby into this world — daughter Vivian, born in July — allowed her to have a lot of fun, but she is definitely adjusting to parental life. “The caffeine helps,” she adds. “I joined Blue Bottle in February 2018, where I lead our digital and people teams. And my husband works in the cannabis industry. A good mix!”

2005

Alexander D. Matlack and Camille J. (McCaul) Matlack ’04 celebrated the birth of son William Arthur on June 12.

2005

Nancy (Cass) Moss, Fairfax, Virginia, writes that son Emerson, born in late July, is “pretty great.” Even before he left the hospital, he was meeting with alums: Alexander M.B. “Sasha” Whitaker, Margaret B. Hill Noojin, Kathryn Salter Gudenberg and uncle Matthew A. Cass ’03.

2005

Jessica M. (Dvorak) Moyer, calls son Samuel, born in April, a “happy little goofball who laughs at everything. Gabby, 6, loves reading, ballet and soccer.” Jessica teaches Chinese language and literature at Smith College.

2005

Phoebe L. Plagens welcomed son James Leo into the world on April 6. “He arrived unexpectedly early and on my birthday,” she notes. Phoebe does communications and advocacy work with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, while husband Nate heads the research department at MLB Network.

2005

Rebecca J. (Couch) Steffy is a writing specialist in the Writing Center at Cabrini University after finishing grad school in English at UW-Madison. She lives in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia with husband Aaron, 3-year-old daughter Seguin and “fluffy cat Moxie.”

2005

Andrea S. (Scott) Turnipseed, Austin, Texas, and her husband are the only providers in the state trained in Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy, a “unique treatment for treatment-resistant depression and other mood disorders,” she writes. “Our clinic, Behavioral Health, is growing quickly and we will be expanding to other locations soon.” Most days she finds parenting Nicholas, 1, and Eve, 3 1/2, even more challenging than running a business.

2005

Lanier F. Basenberg writes: “I have accidentally become Professor Shutt. After all those sociology degrees, I have become a professor of humanities at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, where I teach their interdisciplinary core program.” She caught up with Julie C. Devine, Melanie C. Lawrence and Emily V. Roth for a fall weekend getaway.

2005

Erin A. Carr married Suzanne Shrekgast in June in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Next was a January honeymoon in Vietnam. She took a “highly stressful but also extremely fun” job as assistant controller of the F&B side of the NoMad hotel in New York last summer, she reports.

2006

Mari R. (Franks) Greenberger welcomed a daughter, Tali, in May. “We are settling into life as a family of four,” she writes, “and big sister Noa has assumed the role as CEO of our household!”

2006

Emilee K. (Kaser) Harvey updates from Malaysia that her son was born March 18. “Being a parent is even harder than walking down Middle Path in an ice storm,” she admits, “but we love him to bits and can’t wait to introduce him to the Hill.”

2006

Anne E. Harwood and Matthew D. Marcinczyk update that baby Luke, born February 2017, is “the most fun little munchkin we could have imagined!” The family relocated from Cleveland to Jacksonville, Florida, where Anne began her second residency in dermatology.

2006

Lindsay C. Madaras married her best friend, Heather A. Preston ’05 in Columbus in May. “Kenyon was well-represented on the guest list,” she notes. The couple honeymooned in France and spent most Saturdays in the fall at the Shoe.

2006

Brendan C. McNamara is a staff attorney in the litigation, antitrust and government contracts practice at Fried Frank LLP in Washington, D.C. He and wife Brooke A. Rockwern ’08 celebrated the first birthday of a “future Kenyon alum,” son Sam.

2006

Allison E. O’Flinn and Andrew B. Kingsley “broke a sacred, torrid blood oath” this summer: They got married. Allison “avenged herself by boosting Buster, Andrew’s bloated Maltese, from the reception in her purse,” she adds.

2006

Matthew J. Reynolds spent the spring and summer directing a show for A&E called “Employable Me” and capped the summer by marrying Kristin Lindbeck.

2006

Margaret M. (McNamara) Schmid, Charlestown, Massachusetts, is still practicing data-privacy law (which she calls “an oxymoron”) and leaning heavily into a “bureaucratic personal aesthetic. Mother of two rascals: Quin, 1, and Hinckley Figment, 3 1/2.”

2006

Sarah E. Spiegler started a new position with NC Sea Grant, coordinating a program focused on coastal resiliency and the impacts of sea level rise in North Carolina.

2006

Allyson M. Whipple graduated from the University of Texas, El Paso, with an M.F.A. in creative writing in May. In June she assumed directorship of “Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review.” In July she launched a yoga teaching business, Luna Nidra. She also celebrated five years of teaching at Austin Community College.

2007

Emily A. Cowles and Jason “Cory” Cowles ’06 welcomed a daughter, Arden Allen Cowles, on Jan. 6, 2018.

2007

Erin M. Ellingwood and her husband are buying a house in the Somerville-Cambridge area of Boston. She works for Mass Audubon as web and e-communications manager, helping to protect 38,000 acres of wild land in the state.

2007

Terrell Fuller will graduate from Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia this May. She has launched a marketing consulting business in Washington, D.C.

2007

Christopher B. Laco now teaches both Latin and Greek at St. Ignatius High School in Cleveland and welcomed a second child, a son, to the family last year.

2007

Adam S. Lucas relocated to Kansas City, Missouri, after five years as a graphic designer in New York. Now assistant professor of graphic design at Kansas City Art Institute, Adam lives with his fiancée, Rachel, and “their many plant friends.”

2007

Hannah M. (Garfinkle) Margolis had another daughter, Aviva — “as close to perfect as I’m going to get, so I think I’ll stop now,” she writes. “All the best fairy tales begin with three daughters, and it’s always the youngest who goes off and has all the adventure.”

2007

Charlotte E. Nugent married in May in Taos, New Mexico, and lives in Washington, D.C. She works at Deloitte and serves as an elected official on the local Advisory Neighborhood Commission. She and husband Ben were to honeymoon in New Zealand in December and January.

2007

Patrick F. Shaw started what he thinks may be his dream job: teaching, playwriting and directing full-time at the University of Texas, Austin. “It’s kind of the anti-Kenyon,” he writes. “I think the theater and dance majors alone number 200+? I’m not sure — I’m new.” For the last four summers he has also run an experimental theater camp for teens.

2007

Kyle L. Swenson has bounced among journalism jobs in Nashville, Cleveland and Miami but landed in 2017 at the Washington Post. “Since then,” he explains, “I’ve been a reporter on a breaking news team, covering a little bit of everything, from the daily upheaval inside the White House to school shootings to border violence. It’s definitely an incredible time to be at the Post.”

2008

Andrew J. Berger finished his postdoc in Boulder, Colorado, and took a job as an R&D engineer with a scientific equipment maker in Sunnyvale, California. In April Andy married Maggie Mills in Chagrin Falls, Ohio, with a wedding party that included James M. Berger ’06, Rachel R. Berger ’11, Marc E. Christian, Joshua M. Mitchell, Lauren E. (Goettsch) Walters and Caitlin D. Blake ’07, with many other Kenyon friends in attendance.

2008

Michael J. Chase married Melanie S. Holden ’10 in her hometown of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, this summer. Many Kenyon friends joined them, including her brother Christopher D. Holden and best man John J. Gilsenan.

2008

Paige (MacDonald) Clarke completed her Ph.D. in applied social psychology and lives in Seattle with husband Garrett G. Clarke ’05 and sons Stone and Grey.

2008

Thomas Dickson writes that along with many other alumni he attended the wedding of Robert Z. Sussman and Taylor L. Verderame ’10; Brian H. Dow performed as lead wedding singer. Moreover, T.D. adds, Brian piloted the plane out of which he and Kayla E. Cushner ’10 recently skydived.

2008

Ian F. Gaunt joined the Ohio attorney general’s office, Environmental Enforcement section, in October.

2008

Francis V. Gourrier defended his dissertation, “Civil Rights Husbands: A New History of Manhood in the Black Freedom Movement.” After two years in a visiting position at Kenyon, he is now on a tenure track as assistant professor of American studies and history. Last spring, he and his wife, Laurel Stokes Gourrier ’10, welcomed their second child, Omari.

2008

Karen E.(Singerman) Martin and Stewart H. Martin ’06 live in Cincinnati, where she is executive director of Rockdale Temple. Their son, 3, is “enjoying thoroughly testing boundaries,” she adds.

2008

Isaac M. Miller is in his third year of full-time teaching at Western Heights High School in Oklahoma City. “My classes,” he describes, “are English II and III and mythology, a class I’m particularly excited to teach due to my lifelong interest in myths and legends.”

2008

Andrew M. Schad currently plays Raskolnikov in “Crime and Punishment” at Shattered Globe Theatre in Chicago, where he recently became business manager. Living in the Wicker Park neighborhood with his girlfriend, Drew often meets Matthew M. Peck ’09 to “drink a pint or three and yell at Chicago’s infuriating sports teams.”

2008

Mike Zabek completed his University of Michigan doctorate and moved to Washington, D.C., with his fiancée to work as an economist at the Federal Reserve Board. His section produces research about consumers and community affairs. “I will miss the Midwest,” he adds, “though I sometimes feel that I am moving to a place that is more connected to Kenyon than the state to its north.”

2009

Cari D. Ficken and Richard E. Marinos ’07 moved with baby Lilly to Waterloo, Ontario, for postdoctoral positions last spring. “We are happily settling in,” she reports, “despite Ontario law forbidding the sale of rare hamburgers.”

2009

Cooper C.A. Fleishman and Ellen C. “Ellie” Jabbour ’11 were married at Fort Tryon Park in New York City in September before traveling to Spain and Portugal. Jordan R. Pedersen officiated. In Brooklyn, Cooper is the New York bureau chief for MEL, Dollar Shave Club’s men’s magazine, and Ellie is a creative director at SYPartners.

2009

Andrew C. Hoagland and Zachary J. Shapiro ’08 co-founded a technology startup in Philadelphia called Vetd (vetd.com), which “gives companies a stress-free way to buy from vendors,” he informs.

2009

Michael L. Machala married Jonas Crimm at a summer camp in central Oregon while surrounded by family and Kenyon friends. They live in San Francisco and “aim to get away from the high rent soon,” he updates. Michael writes from India, where he continues to work on post-harvest challenges with smallholder farmers.

2009

Matthew M. Peck relocated to the Logan Square area of Chicago after four years and a World Series in Wrigleyville, he writes. His daily “Locked on Bulls” podcast is the No. 1 podcast about the Chicago Bulls. Matt also just landed a TV gig with NBC Sports, a Bulls postgame show called “Bulls Outsiders” airing after all 82 games this season.

2009

Lucia G. Pizzo and James L. Flaherty welcomed their second baby, born at home. “We definitely have Kenyon to thank for introducing us to home births, and we are so grateful to have been able to welcome these little lives into the world in such a gentle way.”

2009

Alexandra J. White is a principal investigator at the NIH studying how the environment influences breast cancer risk. Meanwhile, she and Michael Greenberg ’10, who started an anesthesiology residency at UNC Chapel Hill, bought a home in Carrboro, North Carolina, which they share with “a pretty wonderful 1 1/2-year-old named Zeke,” Lexi reports.

2010s

2010

Geoffrey P. Anderson celebrated his “most exciting thing” of 2018: the Eagles’ Super Bowl win back in February. “A close second was that Katherine Z. Lin and I had a son, Tatum Lin Anderson, on June 23,” he jokes.

2010

Kegan R. Boland married Cecelia Timmis, whom he met in 2014 in business school at Carnegie Mellon University. The September ceremony was in Michigan, where they reside. Among many Kenyon friends in attendance, Blair N. Withington served as a groomsman.

2010

Alexander C. Carroll graduated from Boston University with a master’s in speech-language pathology and currently works with elementary students in Boston Public Schools. “Although some days feel like working in a battlefield,” Alex reports, “it’s still better than grad school!”

2010

Kayla E. Cushner and Thomas “T.D.” Dickson ’08 welcomed a baby boy, Rivers, in November 2017. “I’m still working as a midwife in Santa Cruz, California,” she writes.

2010

Elyssa M.L. Davis took a job in D.C. with the Headfirst Cos. as manager of residential life and program development. “I ran our inaugural year of overnight summer camp at Episcopal High School,” she writes, “and it was awesome.”

2010

Elisabeth B. Hoffman was sworn in as an assistant state’s attorney for Baltimore City in May. She finds her drama degree particularly useful in the courtroom.

2010

Wilson E. Peters updates from the wilderness: “After two years of planning, I left my job in March, put everything I own into storage, and set out to through-hike the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine.” On Sept. 28 — 2,190.9 miles and 176 days later — Will summited Mt. Katahdin, “finally achieving a goal I realized existed freshman year, thanks in no small part to the Outdoors Club and October reading days excursions.”

2010

Alexandra C. Shaeffer finished her doctorate at the University of Iowa in June and became an assistant professor at Nazarbayev University in Astana, Kazakhstan. “I’m teaching applied linguistics and advanced French, plus doing research and supervising students,” she describes. “I hope I’ve made (the late) Professor Olshanskaya proud, because I use my Russian every day.”

2010

Andrew J. Statler quit his health care job a few years back and took up music full time. “I am gigging all over the D.C. area with the quartet I started called the Blue Dot Jazz Troupe. Fingers crossed that it works out,” he writes.

2010

Claire Z. Steines thanks Laura K. Goehrke for officiating her August wedding. Her Kenyon “loves” on hand included Rachel L. Heydlauff, Shanna Keown Calcei and Jacob G. Calcei, Stefanie R. Couchman, Nora Erickson, Jamie H. White, Megan E. Lahr and Brian J. D’Orazio ’08, Laurel Stokes Gourrier, and Tracey E. (Farris) Wiesenfeld and Justin M. Wiesenfeld; Rachel Goheen was there in spirit. Claire is now an inpatient medicine social worker at a Brooklyn hospital, training to be a Gestalt psychotherapist.

2010

Pengyu “Alex” Zhao completed his M.B.A. from the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business in the spring and is now an associate international equity analyst at a Chicago investment management firm. Married to Wanwan Hao, an interior architect, they have two daughters, Claudia and Rebecca.

2011

Jillian M. Arenz began her second year of a clinical psychology program at Columbia. “Working on several projects,” she updates, “for populations that face stigma surrounding mental health, for example, veterans and mothers with postpartum depression.”

2011

Richard F. Benes is a physical therapist in the Cleveland area. On a get-together in Pittsburgh with Rohit Sudarshan and Marco Saavedra, the trio visited the Warhol museum and “a hot dog restaurant that offers tarantula as a topping,” he writes.

2011

Danielle E. Bishop left a community-engagement event-planning position at the University of Arizona and moved to Barcelona, Spain. “For the next two years I’ll be studying for a master’s degree in cultural management, exploring the city and its many arts and cultural offerings, and enjoying countless plates of patatas bravas and glasses of verdejo,” she shares.

2011

Lauren M. Brady was married to Dan Crook on Sept. 8 in Stowe, Vermont, and then “danced the night away” with Nathaniel J. Carruthers ’10, Erin E. Brady-Carruthers ’14, Kaitlyn W. Meirs and Andrew J. Butler. Lauren started a nursing job in the medical-surgical ICU at Boston Children’s Hospital on Oct. 1 and joined Naomi Blaushild ’10 and Dan McLennon ’09 in running the Chicago Marathon the following week.

2011

Liza W. Chabot, Durham, North Carolina, is executive assistant to the CEO at TransLoc, which “creates technology that makes transit an easy choice for commuters while empowering transit agencies with the data and tools they need to better serve their communities,” she explains. A play directed by Knud Adams for which Liza designed and built the set was featured in the New York Times, alongside a photo of the pieces she created.

2011

Camille I. Farey runs her own web design and digital strategy studio in New York City. She recently teamed up with Taylor Lenci on a fun brand photo shoot.

2011

Avril W. Ho works in planning and management at a public hospital in Singapore, building the capabilities of primary and community care partners so they can better receive hospital patients.

2011

Ryan J. Poh finished a University of Florida M.B.A. in May and works at Keurig Dr Pepper as an associate brand manager on the Snapple and Straight Up tea brands in Dallas.

2011

Matthew G. Siewny defended his doctoral dissertation on protein folding in April and married long-term girlfriend Kelsey in August. He starts a new job in Portland, Oregon, this winter and looks forward to reconnecting with alumni there.

2011

Marta E. Stewart-Bates married Curtis S. Ramsey ’13 in Gambier last June. Professor Timothy Shutt officiated in the Church of the Holy Spirit, followed by a reception in the Great Hall. The bride and groom enjoyed several celebratory market dogs and the obligatory meal at Fiesta.

2011

Kayleigh E. Truman is “thriving as a full-time IATSE Local 1 stagehand in midtown Manhattan.” A proposal she wrote was accepted, so her union’s mental health care coverage will be expanded to increase the number of in-network psychiatrists available to members. “Couldn’t be prouder!”

2011

Hilary L. Wallis married Stephen J. Mack. “Evan A. Weiss officiated the ceremony in Vermont,” Hilary reports, and alumni in attendance sang a rousing rendition of Philander Chase backed up by a brass band. In Brooklyn, she does communications for a Montessori school while Stephen finishes his Ph.D. on 15th-century Italian sculpture and is a research associate for a catalogue raisonne.

2011

Richard Wylde married Mia J. (Addiego) Wylde ’12 on May 5 in Tiburon, California. Jacob W. Bodager ’12 and Benjamin E. McMillan ’12 gave readings, and Rachel N. Oscar gave a “heartfelt and hilarious toast,” Richard writes. “My entire family has now successfully found and married a Lord/Lady — my parents Alan S. Wylde ’79 and Sally D. Wylde ’79, and my sister Meredith (Wylde) Lacaillade ’06 and Justin N. Lacaillade ’06. I am hoping a building will be named after us at some point.”

2012

Ellen D. Blanchard, Ann Arbor, Michigan, traveled north to the third annual Harvest Festival of the Book, sponsored by the Between the Covers bookstore owned by Katherine A. “Katie” (Boeckl) Capaldi ’06. “An amazing weekend of author panels, discussion and a keynote,” she describes. “Save the date for 2019 — Sept. 27–29! Let me know if you want to come celebrate books in a beautiful part of the world.”

2012

L. Michelle Dunavant switched Gambier offices, from Annual Giving to Admissions. “My fall is filled with lots of travel looking for the Class of 2023!” she reports.

2012

Sean E. Edelman, Boston, will forevermore mark Sept. 8 — “almost nine years to the day from our first date at the VI” — as his wedding anniversary alongside Haley K. Abing ’13. “An amazing wedding day with plenty of Kenyon friends in attendance,” he summarizes. They skied in Japan on their honeymoon.

2012

Elizabeth A. Himeles and Jeffrey M. Taylor also married on campus with many friends in attendance on July 21. Jeff received his master’s in philosophy from the New School for Social Research, while Elizabeth received her SHRM-CP certification (in HR). In New York City, she works as a talent acquisition specialist at JDC, a global Jewish humanitarian organization.

2012

John T. “Thomas” Huelskoetter left Washington, D.C. — ”for now!” — for grad school after five years working on health policy with the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank. He’s studying for his master’s in public affairs at Princeton.

2012

Lucas T. Ivey married Ellie Feely on Oct. 6 in Libertyville, Illinois, witnessed by alums from across the country. Groomsmen included Andrew Jurado ’11, Brett D. Williams ’13 and Scott E. Forsythe. Family members of the bride included uncles R. John Feely III ’80, Luke J. Feely ’81 and Joseph C. Wilson ’81, and aunt Alice E. (Feely) Wilson ’85. Luke and his bride live in Charlotte, North Carolina.

2012

Elizabeth R. Jacobs works in advertising in New York City, building campaigns for M&M’s. Ariel Kemp, Portland, Oregon, describes the Himeles-Taylor wedding at Kenyon as “the most beautiful wedding of all time.”

2012

Sonam Lhaki updates: “It’s been a little over a year since I moved back to Bhutan, and it is nice to be with my family.”

2012

Helen T. Liutongco calls it a “shocking twist” that she “is now teaching people how to code at a coding boot camp in Brooklyn.” So far, she’s pretty content with her decision to switch her career/city/general life goals, she writes. “Currently of the belief that life is wonderfully unpredictable, if only you allow it to be.”

2012

Graham H. Sorenson and his wife live outside Vancouver, British Columbia, and have been exploring nearby mountains and the ocean. “I work for Bird Studies Canada,” he explains, “coordinating multiple citizen science bird monitoring projects, conducting outreach about birds and conservation, and teaching bird identification.”

2012

Melody C. Travers moved to Austin, Texas. In November she released her first LP, “Comets and Other Drifting Bodies.” Desiree S. Vodounon started an M.B.A. at Oxford in September. “Samantha L. Rojas was my first visitor!”

2013

James F. Dennin, New York City, took a job at Inverse, a site that covers science and technology, where he runs its innovation and technology coverage and is developing a new section devoted to service journalism and personal finance.

2013

Andrew B. Gipson, Ithaca, New York, is “still waist-deep” in his biochemistry doctoral project but also investing much energy into his teaching. “For fun,” he adds, “I’ve been running Dungeons & Dragons for some friends. It’s a great creative release for someone who mixes tiny tubes of clear liquid all day.”

2013

Madeline A. Jobrack was married in July with many Kenyon friends attending. She spends most of her time “educating the youth of Columbus, Ohio,” she updates.

2013

John T. Krzeminski has been GM of Wilderness Poets: Homestead Staples and Superfoods, for three years as of September. He also entered the M.B.A. program at Southern Oregon University.

2013

Sarah E. Lass completed her M.F.A. in dance at Smith College in May and then went on tour to Colombia and Peru with the Bebe Miller Company. “I’m back in Massachusetts now,” she updates, “working as an adjunct professor (Marlboro College, Keene State and Smith) and taking full advantage of a recently appointed research fellowship with the Five Colleges.”

2013

Melissa K. Nigro attended the Lambda Literary Writer’s Retreat, “where I got to meet a lot of queer writers and work on some short stories. I’m also the art and design manager for Bay Area Children’s Theatre.”

2013

Meaghan E. Pachay returned to the Midwest to start a Ph.D. in English literature at Ohio State and recently hung out with Sarah A. Schiller ’14.

2013

William J. Platschke teaches high school English in the Olathe School District outside Kansas City, Kansas. Willie writes that he knows his students surreptitiously record his mid-class dance moves, so he hopes one day to go utterly viral.

2013

Julie A. Weiner and Jennings T. “Tate” Deskins live in Cleveland, where in September Tate successfully defended his dissertation, earning a physics Ph.D. from Case Western. Julie manages youth choir programs for the Cleveland Orchestra. The couple spent Thanksgiving with Ann M. Colomer and Hillary L. Child, a tradition since graduation.

2014

Jordi Alonso is taking intermediate Greek classes at the University of Missouri as he studies for his Ph.D. comps, which “are somehow less stressful than the ones at Kenyon,” he reports. He’s revising a manuscript of erasure poems taken from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Marble Faun.” It will be illustrated by Mara Vulgamore.

2014

Brandylyn L. Arredondo sends a hello from a cabin in the Bighorn Mountain Range, where she lived for a few months while serving as an interpretation ranger for a sacred Native American site. She now works for Americorps ACCESS in Charlotte, North Carolina, as an employment case aide for refugees while applying to grad school for next fall.

2014

Gregory T. Culley lives in Chicago but works in Nashville, commuting seven hours each Monday and Friday to work as assistant art director on the daytime talk show “Pickler & Ben,” co-hosted by Kellie Pickler and Ben Aaron, and executive-produced by Faith Hill.

2014

Katharina Devitofranceschi is in the second year of her master’s in evolutionary anthropology at the University of Vienna. “After a long seven-year break, I have also returned to the ice. I am skating for the Austrian national synchronized skating team.”

2014

Jameyanne I. Fuller spent a summer as an intern at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Analytical Space. Now she’s back to being buried in casebooks in her final year at Harvard Law. “Counting down the days until graduation and the bar exam and praying there won’t be 400 pages of reading a week anymore after it’s over,” she explains.

2014

Gabrielle A. Giomini is in her fourth year of a clinical psychology doctoral program in Louisville, Kentucky. She works as a therapist with at-risk girls in a residential treatment center and will soon be a group therapist for teenagers in the LGBTQ+ community.

2014

Jonathan I. Green is making his way through the political science doctoral program at Ohio State. Jon recently co-founded Data for Progress, “a small think tank that aims to inform public debates over politics and policymaking with quantitative social science.”

2014

Ana Maricic informs that after living at home for four years and working as a tutor, she is moving to Japan as an assistant language teacher for the JET program. “Equal parts excitement and nervousness,” she notes, “but I’m going to make the most of it.”

2014

Andrea M. Odegaard completed her M.T.S. at Notre Dame and entered Princeton Theological Seminary. “I am now in the full swing of my first semester as a doctoral student in the History and Ecumenics Department,” she updates, “studying church history in the Reformation Period.”

2015

Laura E. Boniface was palling around in D.C. for three years with other alums — “special shout-outs to Margaret R. Tucker, Colin D. Finnegan and Caroline H. Shipman,” she notes — but decided it was time to hit the books again. Now in her first year of law school at the University of Michigan, Laura says, “The similarly Hogwartsian look of the law quad has her wistfully reminiscing about the more idyllic, bygone days of Kenyon.”

2015

Jaime S. Cohen and Andrew P. Pearlman were married in September. Jaime received her master’s in vocal coaching and accompanying from the University of Illinois in May, and in November was music director for Purdue University’s production of “Next to Normal.”

2015

Katherine M. Finnigan moved to New York City and works as a junior data analyst for the Nederlander Organization, a Broadway theater owner and producer. After losing an apartment in Crown Heights to a small fire, she ended up in Bushwick. She “has become a Kimmy Gibbler of sorts to the various Kenyon peeps who live on her street,” she notes.

2015

Elizabeth M. Gardner recently moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Libby works on CBS’ “Murphy Brown.”

2015

Jacob R. Genachowski married Karen J. Sheys ’16 on Aug. 4 in Charlottesville, Virginia. “Kenyon was represented strongly on both sides,” Jake reports.

2015

Drew A. Hogan informs that “after a tour-de-force in Missouri politics,” he is starting a master’s degree program in law and diplomacy at the Fletcher School in Boston.

2015

Adriana Olivares moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, with Aleks “Sasha” Rosnev ’13 and started a new job at Bain & Co. She loves Boston and is excited to see Kenyon people in the city.

2015

Rosemary M. Ouellet and Peter W. Birren were married in the backyard of Rosie’s childhood home, with Emily M. Sussman, Edward G.H. Baxter, Michael A. “Andy” Bazany and Megan H. Shaw helping them dance and celebrate.

2015

Lucas C. Pastorfield-Li, Austin, Texas, writes, “Graduate school is going great. Recently one of my writing teachers told me one of my metaphors reminded him of a suppository. While I’m not exactly sure what that means, given the term’s length and fancy ring, I imagine it entails something quite glorious.”

2015

Josephine I.A. “Aisha” Simon is back in New England teaching French and coaching soccer at Tilton School in New Hampshire. She and her dog, Bella, are on a quest to summit all 48 four-thousand-foot mountains in the state.

2015

Kevin Phillips was promoted to director of ticket operations for the Texas Legends, while remaining senior director of group sales. “We now work even closer with the Dallas Mavericks since Mark Cuban purchased us,” he explains. “Hit me up for tickets while in Dallas.” Kevin is in the final full semester of his M.B.A. classes with only a capstone left in spring.

2016

Manjul Bhusal Sharma, Chicago, passed the Level II CFA exam and was accepted to the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. To “treat himself,” he informs, he traveled to the Philippines, Singapore and India, rediscovering a love of hiking and nature. “I rode a horse to the top of Taal Lake, an active volcano near Manila.”

2016

Henry L. Burbank accepted a job in New York City after completing his two-year service with Teach for America in South Dakota. When not “validating millennial stereotypes (read: staying in his parents’ spare room),” he enjoys exploring the city.

2016

Jonathan B. “Blake” Calcei received his white coat in July and entered Wright State University’s Boonshoft School of Medicine. “I am so lucky to be the third brother of my family to graduate from Kenyon and go on to study medicine in some form.” Jacob G. Calcei ’09 is an orthopedic surgeon, and Beau R. Calcei ’11 is a partner in his own dental practice. Now Lukas C. Calcei ’18, the youngest Kenyon grad, is on the interview trail for dental school.

2016

Emma A. Estes, Falls Church, Virginia, works as a land use planner for Fairfax County, where she “evaluates applications for everything from pet pigs, breweries, cat cafes and churches, to name a few. In my free time I continue to learn guitar, bake things and piggyback on my friends’ JSTOR accounts — true to my Kenyon roots.”

2016

Kelsey A. Ewing roams the Wild West, playing outside: “I spend my summers working as a whitewater raft guide on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River in Montana. My fall is spent fabricating the cabins of snow cats for Great Northern Powder guides in Whitefish, Montana. This winter I will be guiding for the same company as a backcountry cat skiing guide.”

2016

Nicholas S. LaPoint works for ProMedica Health System in his hometown, Toledo, Ohio. In a new position as an Epic analyst with the OpTime and anesthesia team, he builds, maintains and supports Epic for nine hospitals and a couple of surgical centers, working mostly within the surgical world. He’s also moved in with his girlfriend of almost four years, Christine C. Appleby ’17.

2016

Eamon H. Levesque resides in Shelburne, Vermont, with his husband, Milad Momeni. “We are currently crowdfunding startup money for our jointly owned and designed colonial bed and breakfast,” he informs.

2016

Phoebe K. Lewis has been working the national film festival circuit with stints at Tribeca, Mill Valley and Sundance. “I’ll be out in Utah this winter for the 2019 Sundance Film Fest as a coordinator in the press office,” she notes.

2016

Eric S. Niehans started the second year of his master’s in public health. He works at the Minnesota Department of Health’s STD, HIV and TB section helping connect out-of-treatment HIV patients with care and resources.

2016

Elizabeth E. Norman was selected to perform on this year’s Bentzen Ball, an annual comedy festival in D.C. curated by Tig Notaro and Brightest Young Things. She performed standup this summer at Artscape, the largest free arts festival in the country, at the Chicago Women’s Funny Festival and in the second annual Baltimore Comedy Fest.

2016

Madeline R. Thompson is doing research on people with nerve injuries in a neuroscience rehabilitation lab; after hours, Madi skates in the St. Louis Arch Rival Roller Derby league under the name “Oliver Smacks.”

2016

Amy K. Young moved back to her hometown of Cleveland after two years in D.C. working at the Kennedy Center. She has joined Venture for America, a fellowship in entrepreneurship, to work for an incubator for physical product entrepreneurs.

2017

Emily T. Balber started a master’s in art therapy. She also has an internship with Broadway House, a facility that rehabilitates and cares for people with HIV/AIDS in Newark, New Jersey. “Just chugging along,” she adds, “with my cat and the rats I acquired during my time at Kenyon studying psychology.”

2017

Jackson K. Celestin returned to Los Angeles and took a job where he works as a mutual fund analyst and data coordinator. He has taken up Crossfit.

2017

Eric T. Chu started an M.F.A. in creative writing and a teaching assistantship at the University of Washington last fall.

2017

Joia P. Felton, Annapolis, Maryland, teaches at an elementary school and started grad school at Johns Hopkins.

2017

Daniel Garcia-Archundia is pursuing a master’s in educational studies at the University of Michigan.

2017

Benjamin F. Grannis plans trips for Overland Summers in Williamstown, Massachusetts. “I live a humble life in the Berkshires,” Ben muses, “filling my free time with bike rides and visits to the Williams Bookstore.”

2017

Liam C. Horsman moved to Somerville, Massachusetts, where he works for a small research nonprofit and writes for the literary magazine Ploughshares. Last fall he canvassed for Sen. Elizabeth Warren and organized for the Yes on 3 campaign, a state initiative to protect transgender people from discrimination, which won at the polls in November.

2017

Benjamin E. Koses was promoted to a full-time position reviewing new and used vehicles for U.S. News & World Report.

2017

Kayleigh P. Loveland updates from southern China, where she is an ESL teacher: “Despite arriving with no previous knowledge of Mandarin or the culture, I think I’m adjusting pretty well!”

2017

Trevor J. Manz started an MPhil in computational biology in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge.

2017

Nathaniel E. Shahan works as a banking and project finance paralegal for the NYC offices of Latham & Watkins LLP. When he’s not at work, “which is rarely,” he writes, find him “cycling up and down the lower Hudson Valley — look for the Kenyon cycling jersey!”

2017

Deirdre R. Sheridan is pursuing a master’s in contemporary art theory at Goldsmiths, the University of London, in the U.K.

2017

Elana S. Spivack works in editorial and social media for a top-shelf tequila label in New York City.

2017

Winnie Thaw moved to London to pursue her master of science in international politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies.

2018

Eliza M. Abendroth moved to Washington, D.C., to work on education and criminal justice research at Mathematica Policy Research. She joined the D.C. Congressional Chorus.

2018

Matthew F. Carney, a first-year Ph.D. student in physics at Northwestern, published his first paper in the journal “Physical Review D.”

2018

Evan C. Gee works for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a nonprofit defending students’ rights on campuses. “It turns out that all the time I spent speaking out against the actions of Kenyon’s Student Affairs Division sparked an interest!” he offers. Evan lives with Colin S. Cowperthwaite and Paul R. Murphy in a little house in South Philly.

2018

Olivia A. DePalo has a job in a biotech lab that works for the Department of Defense and specializes in wound healing.

2018

Jules A. Desroches submits: “Turns out I figured out a way to use that AmStud degree — by teaching American studies, coaching JV football and working in a dorm in Charlottesville, Virginia, in a UPenn independent school teaching residency.”

2018

Allison C. Dumas serves with AmeriCorps VISTA in Nashville, working at a nonprofit called the Cumberland River Compact.

2018

Stephanie A. Holstein is an editorial assistant at Princeton Architectural Press, which specializes in books on architecture, design, photography, landscape and visual culture.

2018

Natalie S. Kane served as the assistant to the director for a main stage production of “Charley’s Aunt,” which ran October through November at the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey.

2018

Brooke H. Kohn is at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience working on two projects: the Autism Biomarkers Consortium for Clinical Trials, where she runs electrophysiological measures with autistic kids; and a study called CRUSH, which gathers research to build a sex-ed program for adults with autism.

2018

Cecina Babich Morrow began a research and education fellowship at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, where she develops and tests software to model species distributions. She also teaches high school girls to code.

2018

Dana L. Oakes has been in Beijing since July, working as an education and business consultant on telehealth in China for Ivy Gate Education, a Chinese company. She has been attending classes in the Chinese tea ceremony and traveling the region with new Chinese friends and roommates.

2018

Heather M. Pacheco finished a few months studying vegetation in rural Pennsylvania and headed to Washington state to work as a research associate with the Pacific Northwest National Lab, studying trees’ responses to climate change.

2018

Rachel E. Schafer settled into Columbus, Ohio, and a research position with the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Ohio State.

2018

Max A. Smith saw his Kenyon independent studies thesis on mobile telephony in Cameroon and Guinea published as a book last fall. He is on a research Fulbright in Togo studying mobile phones and the rural-urban divide.

2018

Rebecca M. Waters relocated to New England for a job at McLean Hospital, applying dialectical behavior therapy in a residential program for adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

2018

Clara M. Yetter is an au pair in Vienna for a family with two children. “During the day I take German class,” she explains, “and go about this beautiful city. In the evenings I help take care of dinner for the children. I love getting to be back in this city, taking advantage of its culture and improving my German for a possible future career here.”

Also In This Edition