1940s

1948

Ira Eliasoph, White Plains, New York, writes, “I am glad to report that I am in good health, even playing some tennis. Kenyon memories come to mind very often. I taught fencing and choreographed the fencing scene for “Hamlet” and acted in “The Taming of the Shrew” with Paul Newman ’49. V-J Day meant a trip home for the weekend, thankful that I was well-prepared for medical school. My voice was the first to broadcast from WKCG, Gambier, Ohio, “the voice of Kenyon College.” WKCG first broadcast in October 1946 from the basement of the Hill Theater, via equipment con-structed by returning war veterans.

1950s

1950

Philippe A. Plouvier, Germigny, France, turns 93 in October. “Nothing new in Burgundy,” he notes.

1958

Dale A. Neuman, Blue Hill, Maine, keeps busy editing and doing layout for his retirement writing essays in a writing group, writing and reading poetry with the poetry group, participating in skits with the players group, or creating music and travel programs for residents. “I always have something to do.” He exhibited some of his digital designs, created from photos via several soft-ware systems.

1958

Robert S. Price, Philadelphia, attended the dedication of the new Chalmers Library last Oct. 29 and arranged with the Alpha Delta Phi undergraduates and the East Wing Association “what we hoped would be a special treat to honor President Sean Decatur,” he reports. “We knew that Sean had successfully completed the Capital Fund Drive, had gotten the new library completed, and had skillfully navigated the College through the pandemic. We honored him with a personal tour of the AD lodge and the Ganter Price Hall, led by ADs Graham Gund ’63, architect of the new library, and Board of Trustees Chair Brackett Denniston ’69. We believe the tour was a rousing success.” “The 162-year-old lodge is the oldest Greek letter fraternity structure in America,” Bob notes. “Starkly plain outside, it is elegantly furnished with a plethora of Kenyon and fraternity memorabilia. It is extremely rare — almost unprecedented — that anyone other than an initiated member of Alpha Delta Phi is admitted to the Lodge. In contrast, Ganter Price Hall next door to the Lodge has become a premier undergraduate party venue. However, a third of the building, the Squiers Room, is off limits to parties. It is an exact replica of the East Wing Bullseye Room as it existed before the 1949 Old Kenyon fire. It, too, has become a repository of both AD and Kenyon memorabilia. The Ganter is generally open to returning alumni, and we urge you to visit it when you return to Gambier.”

1960s

1960

David J. Gury, Cleveland, Ohio, writes, “We returned from nine months in Cleveland Heights with my daughter Jeannine Gury ’89 P’20 and grandchildren, taking care of a few health issues at the Cleveland Clinic. In late February, one of Elia’s granddaughters in Cuba had a wonderful-looking baby boy."

1962

George Brownstone, Vienna, Austria, shares, “Having spent more than half my life here, I’m much happier than I think I’d be in the States, which has turned into a very disappointing place. Retired from practice (psychiatry and psychoanalysis), still teach and supervise (easier with Zoom), play OK golf when and wherever the weather permits, cook a lot for my busy wife, a gastroenterologist, and am gratified by our daughter’s career progress with Mastercard. Covid’s put a damper on every-body’s lives, but we’ve been four times jabbed, uninfected so far, and it hasn’t been as bad for us personally as it has for many others around the globe.”

1962

Robert K. “Kim” Stevens, San Pedro, California, updates, “To say good-bye to Latin America, where we spent a good part of our lives posted to various embassies, we signed up for a long cruise circumnavigating the continent. We left before the pandemic started, but as we were approaching Fort Lauderdale for disembarkation, the first wave had started. We were on the last cruise ship to be permitted to unload passengers in the U.S., and we took what turned out to be the last train to Washington, D.C., and our small pied-à-terre downtown, where we had planned to see old friends for a few days before returning home to California. It turned into five months together, 24 hours a day, in a 500-square-foot space. (No, we did not divorce afterward.) “It was also an interesting time for Washington, as the Black Lives Matter movement took place. Stores and restaurants were closed, their windows boarded up with plywood. In my 80 years of living in Washington, I had never seen that before. Our 12th-story window looked out on Pennsylvania Avenue, so we had a ringside seat as demonstrators moved toward Lafayette Square and were pushed by the D.C. police, reinforced by about every armed and sworn officer for miles around. Black helicopters were buzzing overhead, putting prop wash on the demonstrators’ heads. And up and down the streets to which the demonstrators were being funneled, a solid line of people in blue lined the sidewalks as far as we could see. This went on for days, so long that I was able to become the on-the-scene correspondent for my hometown newspaper. When we were finally able to book a transcontinental train, we took a room and sealed ourselves inside for the duration, as Delta swirled around us. Looking out the window, it was as if America had been evacuated. Home never looked as good, even with waist-high weeds surrounding it. Especially because I once again had access to my wine cellar.”

1964

Edwin L. McCampbell, Surfside Beach, South Carolina, and his wife, Vicki, are enjoying retirement from medicine and were looking forward to the arrival of their new grandson.

1965

John K. Stamer, Lawrence, Kansas, reports, “Shari and I enjoy spending time with our two granddaughters, who live very near us.”

1966

Richard T. Nolan, Red Lodge, Montana, updates, “My health issues last year prompted Gretchen and me to sell our home in the country and move closer to town. With the sale, 20 years of living a country lifestyle come to an end. Back in 2001, while still living in Virginia and able to commute from anywhere, we decided we wanted less traffic and mountains for recreation. A friend had found Red Lodge and, after a couple visits, we bought 20 acres 11 miles out of town, designed a house and built it on a country road with spectacular views of the Beartooth Mountains. Afternoons we could sit on the porch, view the mountains and hear no human noise. Every year, the first big snow would magically blanket everything in a way that only the emerald green hills of spring grass rivaled. At our height, we had six goats, two dogs, three cats and a parrot. All are gone now except for PT (Prince of Turmoil), our 15-year-old cat.”

1967

Edward J. Forrest Jr., Marietta, Georgia, shares, “Changing with the evolution of fiber optics ... as well as the sociology proposals. The former, as complex and delightful as it may be, is easier than the latter, with so many perceptions and intransigent thought. The loss of discourse will haunt us.”

1967

Nathan N. Parker, New York City, sends greetings: “Hello, class-mates. We are aging like a fine wine, although there are fewer of us. Fortunately, my wife and I have avoided the ‘little c’; however, I now know more people with Covid than at any time during the pandemic. We celebrated our 50th anniversary with our children and grands on Amelia Island. I am still trying to create an Ed Tech — ‘From Dreams to Reality’ — unlocking the potential of children from low-income families.”

1970s

1970

Robert C. Boruchowitz, Seattle, writes, “I recently submitted an expert witness report in a lawsuit in New York concluding that the $75 per hour and $60 per hour compensation rates for assigned counsel in New York City, unchanged since 2004, result in a severe, unreasonable and unacceptably high risk that clients will
be denied effective assistance of counsel. I continue to work as an expert witness in a case in Louisiana about the public defense system. I am still affiliated with the faculty of the Seattle University School of Law, and I participate in state and national bar association committees on public defense. I have been fortunate to spend much of the pandemic with my family in Hawaii.”

1971

Scott Lord, Dover, New Hampshire, updates, “Last October, Marian and I moved across the street ... literally. Might as well have been Timbuktu. My advice is continue to have a lame excuse ready when a friend asks you to help with a move. Meanwhile, my offspring have provided us with five grandchildren, spread from Maui to Massachusetts, aged 1-14. I remain in regular contact with my good friend Jeff Oppenheim. We participate in a monthly Zoom gathering of ten to twelve Pomfret School ’67 classmates to discuss our personal experiences and opinions, as well as books that we select and read on the topics of diversity and racism — a truly enlightening experience for all of us.”

1971

Richard E. Yorde Jr. notes, “After being settled in Chicago for four years, I have finally located a place to resume working on my art furniture and to teach woodworking in the historic Bronzeville neighborhood. With the coronavirus winding down, my partner Jamie J. Barth ’74 and I are preparing to take up the planned travel that has been postponed. Alaska is first on our list.”

1973

Jayne Holmes Arnold, Eaton, Ohio, updates, “Life is good in south-west Ohio. My husband, Bob, and I have done some traveling again. We are fortunate that our daughters and their families (four grandkids) live close enough to visit and that they enjoy hanging out at our lake home.”

1973

Jeffrey L. Bennett, Midland, Michigan, hails, “Greetings! Things are going great up here in Michigan! Susie and I enjoy hanging out with the families of our son Chris and daughter Katie. Susie is working on many art projects, and I’m volunteering at the Sloan Museum of Discovery in Flint. I never would’ve imagined when I started buying used cars at the Flint Auto Auction in 1975 that I would be working at a museum in that town. Of course, back then I never thought I would make a career as a college professor, either! I am also working on three car-show charity fund-raisers — one for the Sloan Museum; one for the American Cancer Society, held in Bay City, Michigan, which has raised $329,000 for that charity since 1995; and one we just started last year for Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Midland. I am beginning to adjust to retirement, although I miss my classes and students. I will always remember my years at Kenyon, my classmates, and professors. Kenyon changed my life.”

1973

Christopher A. Bloom, Chicago, writes, “For the past two years, my wife, JoAnne, and I have been staying at home in quarantine. To combat ennui, at the urging of my daughter, Anna V. Bloom ’04, I started making a cocktail of the day, which I shared on Instagram with family and friends. Our lives were also buoyed by regular gatherings via Facebook Portal with daughter Mary O. Bloom ’09; her husband, Sean Friedland; and their children, our delightful grandsons Cyril (3) and Grover, aka ‘GoGo’ (1).” Chris continues working full time as a partner at K&L Gates.

1973

Patricia M. Eanet, Bethesda, Maryland, completed her certification to teach Jazzercise late in 2021 and now loves teaching it a few times a week. “It’s really a challenge to remember the routines, the cues, and that right is now left and vice versa,” Patti explains. “It’s great to be employed doing something I love to do … and it is very helpful as I cope with endless grief. I continue to volunteer three days a week at the Children’s Inn at NIH, where I have worked for over two decades. We headed to Florida to see my dad, doing amazingly well at 98. We all should age like him. Still active, still sharp. Short-term memory isn’t great, but other-wise, talking to him is little different than it was when I was 20.”

1973

Maria C. “Mia” Halton, Baltimore, concluded eight years of caregiving when she lost her mother in May 2021. “It was hard work to pick up the pieces,” she shares, “but I sold her house and said good-bye. I then found myself in the business of creating this next phase of my life. Two wonderful friends had invited me to join them on a trip to the Galapagos over the holidays, mostly on a small boat. I love to travel, and this trip proved to be the catalyst and jump-start that I needed. I hadn’t been able to make art since quarantine hit, but back at it now. I’m also still teaching — ceramics to special-needs populations, and a class designed to encourage participants to identify what it is they want to ‘say.’ And I’m looking at starting a new kind of retirement com-munity. I see a group of like-minded people coming together into, for example, a one-story industrial building. Each separate space would be open and contain a kitchenette. There would a common kitchen and dining area, also wood and ceramics shops. If this idea strikes your fancy…”

1973

Edward J. “Mel” Otten, Cincinnati, notes, “The public health pundits tell me that the light is at the end of the Covid tunnel, but I am skeptical: The ‘bugs’ will always win, even though we fight the good fight in the emergency room each day. I would retire, but I haven’t found anything else I can do. I see Steven C. Carleton ’78, every day, since his office is 20 feet from mine. I also spent a week with Kevin A. Conry ’71. I’ve made good friends at Kenyon and remember the ones I have lost.”

1974

David S. Barrie, Fernandina Beach, Florida, writes, “I continue my slow descent into retirement. After ten years, I decided to step down as chair of the board at PermaPipe International Holdings. It has been a wonderful experience working with excellent people during a great transformation of the company. I still, however, chair the board of Advanced Battery Concepts, where we are trans-forming the energy storage world.”

1974

James G. Carson, Cincinnati, reports, “Getting back into piano duet playing after a decade-plus hiatus; my new duo partner and I gave a pair of recitals in Cincinnati last spring.”

1974

Edward A. Cohen, Minneapolis, writes, “In 2021, I worked on two long-form film projects: “Law and Order/Organized Crime” and “Armageddon Time,” a forthcoming film from writer/director James Gray. This year I’ve been contacted by Carver Diserens, the creative son of Karla Hay Diserens, about a TV pilot! Meanwhile, I’ve been fortunate to share some good glasses of wine with Jane (Hershcopf) Schreck, Janet Noakes McGannon, Kathleen Hume Britz, J. Christopher Fahlman ’72, Bruce V. Mavec ’72, Frederick H. “Rick” Alles ’72 and Douglas G. Holbrook ’72. I even was able to visit Deborah E. (Boone) Tepper ’77 on Cape Cod, where she and her family now reside. What could really make it a happy turnaround is the opportunity to see my cherished friend, Wilder Gutterson III, this year in London.”

1974

Steven T. Johnson, Brentwood, Tennessee, shares, “Missing my friends and fraternity brothers. Retired and relaxing in the greater Nashville area.”

1974

Dennis R. Pannullo, Venice, Florida, reports, “I have joined the ranks of Chalk Artists Internationale. The Venice Chalk Festival is the oldest in the U.S. and one of the most competitive. I chalked a segment of Gericault’s “The Raft of the Medusa” on the infamous Venice Airport tarmac among a cadre of artists from around the world — sadly, one of our number was trapped in a war zone in the Ukraine — who were working on their own tribute to ‘Resilience.’ My joints were not
so resilient, however. After eight hours on my hands, knees and right hip, my body was enraged with my flight of fancy and remained so for a week. Adding insult to injury, an over-night rainstorm washed away my chalk drawing. Undaunted, we went up to Sarasota to paint the sidewalks with more durable acrylic paint. Altogether, this was the best of times.”

1974

Jane (Hershcopf) Schreck and her husband, Don, joyously celebrated the wedding of their son, Sam Schreck, to Georgia Horn Weinberg on Jan. 22, 2022. “The day was beautiful, and it was a wonderful wedding. It was a bit smaller than we had originally planned — thanks, Covid! — but it went off without a hitch, and everyone stayed healthy. Janet Noakes McGannon traveled up from Sarasota, which definitely made it even better!”

1975

Elizabeth B. Friedberg, Melrose, Massachusetts, updates, “After 37 years, I retired from the Massachusetts Historical Commission, the state historic preservation agency, where I was director of the National Register program. I loved my job and the work we did, but it was the right time to move on. So far I’ve been keeping busy with home projects and enjoying quilting and pottery and my vegetable garden, and I hope to do some traveling. My husband, Drew McCoy, continues to teach American history at Clark University. And the apples don’t fall far from the tree. Our daughter, Laura, recently got her Ph.D. in history; she and Tim married last summer, and she is working at the greater Chicago YWCA as coordinator for a program on diversity, equity and inclusion. Our fourth family history major, our son, Ethan, is communications manager for Grassroot Soccer, a nonprofit that uses soccer to engage adolescents in developing countries in health-related issues.”

1975

Matthew S. Mees, Braintree, Massachusetts, reports, “Dividing my time between casting concrete counter-tops, maintaining a small greenhouse and charting the quotidian of 18th century Boston and Newport. Current enthusiasms are levering heavy slabs; lunar planting; French/First Nation captive narratives. I find that I pay much closer attention to the weather and stars than I used to.”

1975

John A. Mitchell, Lakewood, Colorado, writes, “Amazing to realize I’ve already been retired for six years and my 50-year high school reunion passed by unnoticed last year, due to the pandemic. Tempus fugit! Retirement is the best job I ever had. My wife, Russetta, and I keep busy visiting our seven grandkids (and of course their moms and dads). Our oldest granddaughter just became a teenager and has embraced it fully. And, bragging a bit, our oldest daughter started her own architecture firm in 2021, while our middle daughter was promoted to full colonel in the USAF. Russetta and I volunteer through our local lodge of the Elks, who do great work with schools, drug abuse prevention and homeless military veterans. In the past two years our lodge has helped 40 formerly homeless veterans furnish their city-sponsored apartments and provided free books to two local elementary schools.”

1975

John M. Walbridge Jr., Basking Ridge, New Jersey, notes, “I am five years into retirement, enjoying a return to a life not dissimilar to college days — limited responsibilities and lots of time for self-indulgence. I still ride my bicycle obsessively, if a bit more slowly and cautiously. I spent 40 years in the insurance business working with companies on their employee benefit plans. Jane, my wife of 40 years, also retired, serves our com-munity by volunteering. Our daughter and her husband, who live in the D.C. area, both work for the federal government. She gave us our second grandchild in January (the first is now 4). Jane and I spend a lot of time with them. Our son married — twice, thanks to Covid logistics — a girl from Ohio whom he met during a college year abroad in Dublin. They now live outside Columbus, near a bicycle trail that runs past Gambier. Someday, I will ride my bike on this trail back to Kenyon.”

1976

Robert W. Baldwin, Niantic, Connecticut, shares, “After changing my major from English to art history, I transferred to NYU after two great years at Kenyon and a good start from Professor Eugene J. “Gene” Dwyer. (Best course ever: Bill Frame’s intro to poli sci.) After getting a Ph.D. in art history at Harvard (1983), I’ve taught at Connecticut College since 1985 and have started phased retirement. I have a digital archive of 175,000 images of Western art, 3,500 slide shows of art by subject, another 3,500-slide show of art by artist — for a free copy, on a hard drive you send me, email me at rwbal@conncoll.edu. In 1992, I married Amy Bogert. Our brilliant but socially anxious son, Mason Bogert, died at age 23 in February 2021 after struggling for five years with a severe brain injury caused by an accidental opioid overdose in May 2016. He was left blind, paralyzed, mute, and unable to eat or drink. Over the next two years, none of these problems disappeared, but his consciousness, long-term memory and identity returned. His legacy is the free Android weather radar app he designed as a self-taught computer whiz at 17: Weather Radar Widget.”

1976

J.C.B. “Jan” Kinch updates, “Not much happening in the sleepy town of Edinboro, Pennsylvania, the place I’ve called home since 1988.” Since completing her master’s and Ph.D. at BGSU in 1986, Jan has been a professor of English and honors director at Edinboro University. “Would love to hear from any of the old gang; I would love to reconnect with those dear friends from the good ol’ days. I have been wanting to visit Kenyon, but fear I might not recognize the place because of all of the new construction and other updates.”

1976

Tana L. Moore, Minneapolis, writes, “Retirement and two hip surgeries later, I am back whole again. Spent part of the winter on Wadmalaw Island, South Carolina, enjoying digging into the history of the Charleston area and beautiful landscape of the barrier islands. I’m still in that ‘messy middle' of transition from full-time work to the life of a modern elder, but I must say, I love living in the moment."

1976

Rabbi Charles P. Rabinowitz, Larchmont, New York, updates, “Neshama: Association of Jewish Chaplains decided to restart its journal, so as a former editor, I’ve been appointed co-chair of the Publications and Research Committee. As a hospice chaplain, I still see Covid affecting our patients and families; we continue to have Covid deaths as the mandates change. We still need to follow PPE protocols.”

1977

Timothy G. Barber and Madia R. Barber, Cashiers, North Carolina, are in their second year of living full time in the western mountains of North Carolina. “We are equidistant from our three sons, two of whom are in Atlanta, one in Charlotte. Since the birth of our grandson March 3, the grand-children are evenly divided as well — we have a granddaughter and grandson in each city. I retired from King & Spalding, and Madia retired from her work with a local nonprofit. We hope to travel more widely and apologize for missing all the class calls — something always seemed to come up. Don’t give up on us!”

1977

Rosemary P. Begley, Louisburg, Kansas, a Disney artist participant in the Festival of the Arts at Disney World, signed prints for four original paintings — two Dumbo scenes, a Beauty and the Beast Castle, and a Space Mountain scene. She has begun a manuscript of her art-work that she hopes to publish.

1977

Peter F. Meyer, Napier, New Zealand, updates, “Happily retired and living in New Zealand, where I’ve been since 1991. My kids (30 and 26) are settled and working on this side of the equator for now. I’m singing in two choirs, sailing a bit, reading a lot and enjoying a very full life with my wife, Mirabel. Class of ’77 visitors always welcome!”

1978

Jay L. Dworkin, Milford, Connecticut, writes, “I’m delighted to be practicing dentistry with my daughter in our new dental practice, Dworkin Dental Group, and sailing, skiing and enjoying life with my wife, Heidi.”

1978

Robert K. Lundin, Glen Ellyn, Illinois, reports that the Awakenings Review, a literary journal Rob established in 2000 at the University of Chicago, was selected for the Gutenberg Award by the Great Lakes Graphics Association for excellence in design and graphics. The journal publishes writers and poets who have a relationship to mental ill-ness — either self, fam-ily member or friend.

1978

Robert H. Mitchell and Elizabeth L. Mitchell ’80, Richmond, Virginia, are enjoying life as grandparents. “Although Betsy and I are much too young for that,” Rob explains, “it’s been fun watching and occasionally helping our daughter, Tyler, with her 5-month-old identical twin boys. She also has a 2-year old boy, just to make things exciting.” Betsy continues to work in a store full of designer jewelry, and Rob continues to consult with banks. Fifty banks and Google now use software created by his company. Rob has enjoyed recent Zoom calls with fellow Dekes and friends, although, he adds, “none of us are happy about the reason — which is cheering on Jeff Spear as he fights through health issues.”

1978

James R. Pierce Jr., Houston, reports, “Still working! Second grandchild on the way. Have published a historical fiction book on President Lincoln called ‘Treachery: A Story of Deception behind the Union Lines,’ dedicated to the late history professor, Roy Wortman.” Find his book online at Barnes & Noble or Amazon.

1978

Bruce V. Thomas and Julia H. Thomas ’80 split time between Richmond, Virginia, and Guiting Power, a village in England’s Cotswolds. Bruce is in his ninth year working with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in infectious disease — mostly TB, dengue and now Covid. In seven years, he’s “averaged more than 400,000 flight miles per year, and then two years of zero flight miles,” he updates. “Headed back to India, then Indonesia, and then South America and Tanzania. Gliding toward retirement in 2023–24. Feel like these last 10 years with BMGF have sanitized the rest of my professional career.”

1979

Sandra Lane Joseph, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, reports she is enjoying the Florida sunshine, teaching at Florida Atlantic University Medical College and loving downtown Fort Lauderdale. "Crazy place at spring break, but my daughter, Jessica (Denison '23), loved meeting her friends on the strip. Our son Joshua attends Ohio State. Summer finds me at our cabin in the Hocking Hills of Ohio. Come visit in either place!” In May, Sandra attended the men’s lacrosse NCAC tournament matchup with Denison, wondering whom to root for!

1980s

1980

Leslie Marting, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, reports, “Our family is grateful to have weathered the pandemic with-out any major issues. I continue to enjoy my work as an interior decorator with my own business, Marlboro Antiques & Interiors Ltd. My husband, Michael, is retired from Jones, Day but continues to consult and stay active. My primary volunteer activity is the Garden Club of America, and I find my work on the scholar-ship committee very rewarding. Son Michael G. ‘Geo’ Marting Jr. ’14 is a VP at Piper, Sandler in NYC, and daughter Pauline is a marketing project manager for the Cleveland Clinic.”

1980

Clayton H. Paterson, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, shares, “I love reading about my classmates’ exploits as we embrace retirement. I retired six years ago as a lawyer with Johnson & Johnson, the baby shampoo company. I haven’t looked back. And now, a bit of modeling. A little less cerebral, for sure. Enjoying being a grandparent (twice). I said I’d never live in Florida; now, I don’t want to leave.”

1981

Jay N. Anania, Chevy Chase, Maryland, rejoined the Organization of American States as the senior official for administration and finance in early 2021. “As the world rightly turns its attention to Russia’s attempted military conquest in Ukraine,” Jay writes, “it seems inevitable that the U.S. will devote even less attention to the many urgent social, political and security challenges in our own hemisphere. Without strong U.S. leadership, the OAS’s goals to advance human rights, democracy, development and security are sure to lag. On a brighter note, as a fully vaccinated and boosted family, we resumed travel and went to New England, particularly enjoying a visit with Fred B. Grubb ’81 at his beautiful Vermont home and hiking up a mountain or two.”

1981

Suzanne W. Crable, Cincinnati, shares, “Many changes for me in the past few years! I am the lactation consultant for the Good Samaritan OB Center in Cincinnati, working with families to promote and support breast-feeding. We downsized and moved to Madisonville, an eastern Cincinnati neighborhood, requiring lots of trips to donate away many things! I qualified for and ran the 2022 Boston Marathon in April, 40 years after my first marathon. Two kind sons all grown up with loving partners. Four cats to amuse us. When training eases, I knit, sew, watch birds and write.”

1981

Brett M. Pierce, Freeport, Maine, has been working in the world of global media for social change, as well as digital storytelling in education. “Excited about my book for teachers that came out in May from Heinemann Publishing, called ‘Expanding Literacy: Bringing Digital Storytelling into Your Classroom.’ Two beautiful young adult kids and my wife, Kerry, of 25 years. Kenyon buddies are still my best buddies. My commitment to fun remains steadfast.”

1982

Peter S. Austin, Cockeysville, Maryland, celebrated a 10-year anniversary working for T. Rowe Price. “I run a global investment business and am very tired of Zoom calls at all hours,” Peter shares. “Looking forward to the world reopening.” In May, Peter enjoyed his first visit back to the Hill in 40 years.

1982

Sylvia S. Duggan, Philadelphia, works part time as a preschool assistant and helps her husband and grown kids navigate the changes COVID has brought.

1984

Edward W. Caulkins, Highlands Ranch, Colorado, updates, “Winding down a scattered array of business careers and companies. Blessed to be living outside Denver with my great wife and two boys about to graduate from CU — couldn’t get into Kenyon! Ha! Wishing we could do it all over again!”

1985

The Rev. Taylor W. Burton-Edwards, Columbus, Georgia, continues to live “La Vida Ecumenica,” he writes — as director of Ask the UMC (United Methodist Communications); a rostered pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, serving a congregation in Warner Robins, Georgia; and leading worship-related workshops for the Flint River Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church USA. Taylor still chairs the Consultation on Common Texts, serving in his third and final term as secretary of the North American Academy of Liturgy, as well as treasurer for the Liturgical Conference — all while married (for over 31 years) to an Episcopal priest.

1985

Jim Cravens, Orlando, Florida, reports that he and his wife, Alexandria, recently sold their home and moved into a downtown apartment. “We wanted to be in an area where we could walk to restaurants, bars and music. The average age of our new neighborhood is also about 30 years younger than our previous one, so it’s quite a change of pace.”

1985

Jennifer M. Mizenko, Oxford, Mississippi, updates, “Mostly figuring out life after full-time academia. Before the surge of Delta and Omicron, I was able to visit my brother Michael R. Mizenko ’81 in Denver, and my other two brothers in California. I continue to teach a gentle movement and meditation class online. Hit me up at thedancelady@gmail.com if you’re interested in joining!”

1986

Theodore K. Manley, Columbus, Ohio, writes, “Carol and I are enjoying our experience as parents of a current Kenyon student, Evan D. Manley ’25, who settled into an enlightening, if unorthodox, year on the Hill. I’m still in touch with my Hansons (Lars J. Hanson ’86 and David F. Hanson ’87) and Gail C. Hersh Jr. ’87. Manley Deas Kochalski, our law firm, is working with Kenyon’s Career Development Office to offer students and graduates work experiences helpful in preparing for a legal career.”

1986

Charles R. Needle, Longmont, Colorado, won an honorable mention in the landscapes and wildlife category of the 11th annual International Mobile Photography Awards Contest. “My winning image,” he shares, “titled ‘Aspen in Fog,’ placed among thousands of entries worldwide. This is the third year I’ve received awards in this prestigious photo contest, which recognizes and celebrates the talent and imagery of mobile phone photo and art communities worldwide.”

1986

Sarah Kading Frankum, Redmond, Washington, writes that her empty-nester status changed briefly when COVID brought the kids home. But now, Sarah has been able to go back to school herself. “Graduated with a master’s in sustainability leadership from Arizona State University’s online program,” she writes. “Hoping to use my degree to make waste-to-energy solutions a reality.”

1987

Peter B. Luther updates, “Living the semi-retired life between Princeton, New Jersey, and Kiawah Island, South Carolina. Retired from full-time work three years ago, now serving on three boards, one of them the U.S. Soccer Foundation, along with Charles D. “Cully” Stimson ’86. It’s been a nice mix of more personal time and staying engaged at a less intensive level with business. Looking forward to my former roommate and Delt brother Timothy G. Ehrhart moving down to S.C. For anybody visiting the Charleston area, ping me to play some golf!”

1987

Craig A. Phares writes, “After 30 years of living in downtown Manhattan, I have moved out — to Brooklyn. Perhaps it is a sign of age. Not sure. But I do enjoy my new outdoor space — and the laid-back feel of my Boerum Hill neighborhood. Perhaps most important, my three young kids love it. I am still slaving away in finance, but my new commute dulls the pain.”

1987

Edwin Christian Schoenleb Jr. updates, “My family and I escaped the cold Midwest and returned to my hometown of Phoenix in 2018, where I work at North Valley Christian Academy as the head of school. It’s great to finally be done with Covid and see explosive growth. Our daughter Megan graduated from Templeton Honors College at Eastern University and completed student teaching in December with plans to teach English at a Lutheran school.”

1988

Robin J. Caiola updates, “I have been living in New York City since 2001, when my twins were born. They are now freshmen in college — my daughter at Duke, my son at Brown. I got a bonus year with them when they both took a gap year. In addition to raising them, I have been splitting my time between professional photography and nonprofit management. Currently, I chair the board of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, which works to improve health and nutrition, and I am on the advisory board of Beyond Plastics. I get together with Aileen C. Hefferren often and keep in touch with several other Kenyon friends. My son participated in Kenyon Review’s Young Writers summer program a couple of years ago and loved it.”

1988

Tara L. Jones, Eugene, Oregon, writes, “What I am loving these days is resuming activities that were restricted during the first two years of the pandemic: going to movies and concerts, eating dinner with friends, in-person practices with the other member of my music duo. I have also returned to composing piano sketches and started a blog.” Join Tara’s mailing list for her latest compositions or subscribe to her blog at taral@efn.org.

1989

Lisa M. Parker Ernst, Gahanna, Ohio, updates, “As you may notice from my last name, I got married! His name is Kevin Ernst, and he loves Gambier and Kenyon as much as I do. In fact, his favorite hat is the Kenyon 43022. I have also started a new position as a reading specialist. I work with second- through fourth-graders and love it! It has reinvigorated me, and I took an intensive Orton-Gillingham course this summer. My last child, James P. Loveland ’22, graduated in May. I am so lucky to have watched all my kids graduate from Kenyon.”

1989

Michelle Graves, Orlando, Florida, writes, “In busy 2021, I downsized to a condo (still in Orlando) and enjoy the easier lifestyle. One of my sons, Stephen, married his high school sweetheart. Son Tom graduated from USF with a degree in biology, and son Matt started college. I’m enjoying my work on the human resource information system team at Travel + Leisure, and, like many others during COVID, became somewhat addicted to my peloton.”

1989

Jennifer L. Nix has spent 28 years on California’s Monterey Peninsula, 27 of them “in the beautiful little beach town of Pacific Grove,” she shares. “Still teaching kindergarten and staying ‘young’ via my truly young student teachers. My daughter (14) and I are very involved in our local theater scene, and we emerged from the lockdown last summer to perform in ‘Shrek: The Musical’ at the historic Outdoor Forest Theater in Carmel. We had so much fun, and it got us out of the house so my husband, Kelly, could play guitar in peace. He feels so blessed to live with two drama queens!”

1989

Scott Walters, Wayland, Massachusetts, updates, “After 20 years selling loyalty and order-ahead SAS software for Paytronix — which I helped start back in 2001 — I’ve joined what feels and looks very much like a tech startup, running their sales team and building apps for convenience stores with a company called Rovertown. Not only have they switched me to be a Mac user for the first time in 30 years, I’m 23 years older than their president, who started the company 11 years ago in his college dorm. I’m thrilled to be starting this new adventure! Family and kids are great as well!”

1990s

1990

Squire Derek Bennett, New Canaan, Connecticut, a technologist, software architect and team lead for fintech company ION Group, updates, “I am living in my hometown with my wife, Shekaiba, and our sons Strider (18) and Phoenix (12). Strider is a freshman at Union College. During his admissions process, I was grateful for the opportunity to reconnect with Sonya D. Dudgeon, who worked in admissions there, before she passed. I regularly visit Matthew J. Perry in the city and no longer see Erika Richards ’89 nearly enough since my kids stopped attending her German school. I truly enjoy staying in touch with the wider Kenyon diaspora via Facebook and Instagram, especially the K80s group.”

1990

Joseph C. Bline, Dublin, Ohio, reports that last February he attended his oldest son Steven’s high school basketball tournament game at No. 4 Pickerington North with Jon D. Wilkin ’89 and Stephen M. Baldwin. “Steven had eight points, 13 rebounds and five blocks. Lost by 15, but we have everyone coming back next year. We had a great time catching up after the game with pizza and refreshments.”

1990

Una I. (Slevin) Fogarty, who works in real estate development, sends greetings from New York City. Her eldest daughter is at Cornell, and her younger daughter started at Colby this fall. “I had always hoped one would land in Gambier,” Una writes, “but they had other ideas, sadly. With a little more time on my hands I have been involved with leading the newly formed Kenyon Women Giving Back (forward.kenyon.edu), an effort to encourage philanthropy and highlight the many ways Kenyon women contribute to both the college and community. We are running panels featuring women alumnae several times a year — I hope you will join, or suggest Kenyon women for us to feature.” An event last March, titled “Kenyon Women Giving Back: In Knox County” — which opens with Una leading the discussion — is available on YouTube.

1990

Julia Muggia Ochs, New Rochelle, New York, shared a few of her many family highs and lows over the past few years: “I lost my father suddenly in September 2021 and am getting used to the new normal. My boys are now teenagers, and time seems to be accelerating. I am expanding into professional mediation, having completed the coursework through Cornell University in February 2022. This shift is inspired by my volunteer work as an elected school board member in New Rochelle. I am currently serving as board president, which is both challenging and rewarding, given the current climate. I continue to hang out with my Kenyon roomies Sarah (Watts) Beneke and Jessica (Hart) Selden, and we are trying to get together at least once a season.”

1991

Meryl H. Brott, Allston, Massachusetts, updates, “Still living in Boston with my partner Kevin Shanahan and continuing to work for the city of Cambridge DPW Recycling Division. Getting more and more freaked out about the climate and ecological emergency — and still volunteering with Extinction Rebellion. Encourage everyone to join — it’s an international movement (rebellion.global), and we are running out of time. We have a moral obligation to act.”

1991

Thomas S. Dilsheimer, Philadelphia, reports, “Enjoying being an empty-nester with wife, Susan, in the Fairmount neighborhood of Philadelphia, with the Museum of Art a stone’s throw away, which makes me happy. Continued expansion of our real estate team The How Group, a Compass Real Estate affiliate, also makes me happy.”

1991

John G. Douglass notes, “Life is good in Tucson for Jill and me, although the pandemic has certainly put a strain on everyday life. Connections and collaborations with fellow Kenyon ’91 alums continue. I recently started a book series, focused on global colonialism, with the University Press of Colorado and its director, Darrin A. Pratt. Jill and I continue to work with Xela AID Partnerships for Self Reliance, a nonprofit in Guatemala.

1991

Before the pandemic, Phillip E. Wilson Jr. and one of his daughters went on a service trip with Xela AID to Guatemala and, based on that experience, he was invited to join its board. So terrific to be working alongside Phil, rolling up our sleeves for others.” John and Phil were looking forward to their service trip together this summer

1992

Lainie Thomas, Manila, Philippines, wrote in on “a sunny February morning” that she was celebrating her 13th year in the Philippines. “It’s hard to believe I thought I was moving here for a three-year assignment in 2009. The pandemic has left us empty-nesters. Our younger two moved to the U.S. for boarding school in Delaware, and our older two are at Boston College and Purdue. The oldest spent her junior year at LSE in London, so we went to see her at Christmas — right in the middle of the Omicron wave. I changed jobs and now lead my organization’s work on fragile and conflict-affected situations. It’s full of new challenges, not least because of the political changes in Afghanistan and Myanmar in 2021, but it’s also a nice change and creates opportunities to work with new colleagues inside and outside my organization. One of the highlights of 2021 was the opportunity to be a guest speaker at a Kenyon class — my, those students were young! I enjoyed it immensely and hope to have another chance.”

1993

Melissa Wood Brewster updates, “My family and I are back in Seattle after living in Spain for a couple years. Since returning, I have been busy parenting three kids in high school, managing a busy psychotherapy practice and trying to stay healthy into my 50s. Fun having my niece playing lacrosse for Denison University.

1994

Jennifer U. Anderson, Seattle, started a new role last year at T-Mobile in digital marketing, leading a team “to define the holy grail of connecting traditional brand marketing to e-commerce impact,” she explains. “No easy task for any industry, so please reach out if you’ve done it! Our daughter started high school; despite a few COVID-related closures she enjoys classes and sports (finally) in real life! We spend a lot of time with Katie Usher Snyder and Alfred C. Snyder enjoying family, skiing, cooking, running and sharing our latest and favorite audiobook downloads (I am somewhat obsessed on this).”

1994

Colleen H. Grazioso updates, “Now that my husband and I can work from home forever, after 18 years we have moved from Millburn, New Jersey, to Manchester Center, Vermont! Reach out if you are in the area!” Michael P. Rutter sent in an update that’s almost not an update: “Same town (Arlington, Massachusetts). Same job (MIT). Same spouse (Amy). Same kids (Abby, Sammy, both 10). New dog (a Cavapoo named Luna, most often called Tuna).”

1995

Emily Carifa, Far Hills, New Jersey, works in executive search as a freelance researcher specializing in the consumer products and technology industries. She updates, “I have three girls — a junior at Villanova; a first-year at Wake Forest and a junior at Bernards High School. I also have a home full of rescue animals — three dogs, one indoor/outdoor cat and three outdoor barn cats.” Emily’s family played and watched a lot of hockey last winter (all five family members play) and cheered on the Villanova men’s basketball team, which made it to the Final Four.

1995

J. David Hicks, Bristol, Tennessee, writes, “For those with kids who think you’re dumb, I have good news. Now that eldest son Alex is a college grad, married and a homeowner, he now thinks I’m smart and calls me for advice frequently. So while your kids may question your intelligence now, the day is coming when you’ll once again be that smart, intelligent person you were in 1995 when you graduated from our esteemed alma mater.” Because David still has a college student, high schooler and middle schooler, “patience is still required in regaining this stature in your offspring’s eyes.”

1995

Seth W. Peter, Minneapolis, wrote last spring, “My sons Eli (17) and Oscar (15) are busy with high school, swimming and baseball. We’re deep into college visits and made it out to Kenyon last fall.” Seth works with tech startups and sculpts incredibly gorgeous “tufted wood” products that must be seen to be believed (sethpeter.com).

1996

Yuri Bredle, Cincinnati, writes, “Now that I’m going on college visits with my oldest, the thoughts do turn fondly to Kenyon. I’m in Cincinnati, working out of the home office. I don’t get up to Gambier as much as I’d like. With three teens, life is all about trying to coordinate schedules and anticipate what’s around the bend. My wife, Erica, and I are trying to give them a good launch into the world. I have less free time and more power tools than I did when we were in school.”

1996

Stephanie M. Hill, Westerville, Ohio, reports, “Still own my own business, Light Bulb Moment Consulting, while working full-time as a senior process analyst for Berry Appleman & Leiden, an immigration law firm out of Dallas. I may have spent my last winter in Iowa! I have written 16 chapters of my first book and am looking to be published. Reach out to me with advice. I’m all ears!”

1996

Sarah E. (Slater) Lang, Macedonia, Ohio, is a family-practice physician in Streetsboro, Ohio, in her 18th year of practice, now shifting to half clinical and half administrative, she reports. “I am the Eastside medical director for the University Hospitals of Cleveland Primary Care Institute, which basically means I help oversee about half of our outpatient primary care offices. It’s a little bit clinical, a little bit recruiting, a lot of finance and human resources, and I have been putting my Kenyon liberal arts education to good use! My other full-time job is chauffeur and event coordinator for my five kids: William (16), Bennett (14), Sam (12), Eliza (11) and Norah (9). As you can guess, never a dull moment in the Lang household!

1997

Anne (Roberts) Moore, Greenville, South Carolina, is the constituent relations coordinator in Limestone University’s Office of Institutional Advancement. She returned to work at the university after an 18-year absence to raise her three children, Archie, 18, and Kit and Walter, both 16. Anne and her husband, John, are guiding the twins — who graduate from high school this year — through the college search process. “Archie, who has Down syndrome, often impresses strangers with his extensive knowledge of countries and languages, states and capitals,” she shares. “His command of the global landscape doesn’t surprise his family, though, because Archie has taught all four of us never to judge a book by its cover.

1998

Amanda Wagoner Meade, Jeffersonville, Indiana, became the senior pastor of First Christian Church of Louisville, Kentucky, in January 2022.

1999

Sarah H. Booth, Dobbs Ferry, New York, and her husband, Armando Inarritu, welcomed a son, Sebastian Inarritu Booth, born on March 22, 2022, in New York City.

2000s

2000

Molly (Willow) Vogel, Westerville, Ohio writes: “Last winter we helped my folks find a place down the road from us to split time between here and my hometown of Portland, Oregon. My kids (9 and 7) enjoy having Grammy and Pop Pop nearby and cheering at soccer games (so many soccer games). I’m in my fourth year as advancement communications director at Kenyon and recently had the immense pleasure of working with Murray Horwitz ’70 and Chris Toft ’89 as emergency emcees at Reunion Weekend. Sorry I missed nearly all the rest of you! Next year? I’m also mostly excited to have been asked to serve as one of the chairs of Kenyon’s Bicentennial in 2024. I’d love to hear your ideas for how we should celebrate this milestone!”

2001

Emily W. Andersen, Hingham, Massachusetts, updates, “After serving as a law clerk for nearly three years in the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts in Boston, I’m planning to re-enter law-firm life this fall. I’ve been lucky enough to clerk for three amazing federal judges and love working ‘behind the scenes’ at the courthouse. Aside from work, I’ve been keeping busy writing a series set in a London bookshop. I recently found representation with a literary agent, and the next step is to find a publisher. I’m very excited to finally push my longtime passion for writing back into reality and am keeping fingers crossed to see my books in print someday soon.”

2001

Scheroi D. Taylor writes, “I am still living in Nashville. I now work in Gallatin, which has increased my commute time, but I get to be around chemicals again. In my personal life I am now a bit of a gym junkie, lifting weights and boxing.”

2003

Natalie Philpot, Manchester Center, Vermont, is “still living her best single-mom life in southern Vermont with her two beautiful daughters and portly cats,” she reports. Working in substance misuse prevention, she spoke at Vermont’s Recovery Day as a featured voice of recovery. “Unable to make it to Reunion — bummer! Performed in a musical that weekend. Once a theater geek, always a theater geek.”

2003

Carlos M. Vega, South Windsor, Connecticut, updates, “After 14 years coaching, with the last eight as the head swimming and diving coach at Trinity College, I’ve decided to hang up my stopwatch to pursue other professional opportunities.” In April, Carlos joined Consigli Construction in Hartford in its business development department, “focusing on higher education/athletics/life science/health care and other private projects. Alyssa is doing great working at a children’s boutique store. Lucy (6) and Penelope (8) are two peas in a pod and bring us so much joy and love!”

2004

Alexander J. Franz and Erin N. Franz ’06 report that they have loved living in San Diego for the past six years, “but it is time to move on!” In April, AJ started the training pipeline to take command of the fast attack submarine USS Jefferson City SSN 759, “based at the tropical paradise of Guam,” he writes. “Come visit Guam after January 2023!”

2004

Jillian Levine-Sisson and her husband, Scott, just bought their first house — “or, as my father calls it, a hole in the ground that you throw money into, never to be seen again” — in Silver Spring, Maryland. “We look forward to the completion of our Victorian oddities-themed study, a steampunk dining room and a powder room dedicated to Prince.” Jillian and Scott celebrated their 10th anniversary last year.

2004

Grace Van Cleave, Des Moines, Iowa, ran for a seat in the Iowa Senate this year “focusing on reproductive, social and economic justice,” she reports. “I had no idea how much I would like running for office.” She spent the spring working, listening, fundraising and door-knocking before the June 7 primary, in which she garnered 1,336 votes but did not win. “The best part of running for office has been reconnecting with so many of my Kenyon classmates,” she shared last spring. “I am humbled by the overwhelming support I have received from the Class of 2004 and other alums. In a health-care question during an endorsement interview (which I did earn), I used information I picked up from talking to John R. Tisdale and Erin E. Hayward! Lauren Bierman Waller knit me an Iowa beanie and mittens in Paul Wellstone green.”

2005

Aaron W. Brewington, Bloomington, Indiana, is director of corporate communication at an Indiana-based technology company. He was elected president of the Lawrence County Economic Development Council and is active in his local Rotary Club, volunteering as club treasurer. In his spare time, he writes for Bloom Magazine. His partner, Rachel DiGregorio, runs a pet rescue that takes in the animals of older people transitioning to senior living.

2005

Thomas M. Coiner, Marlborough, Massachusetts, appeared off-Broadway in D.H. Lawrence’s “The Daughter-in-Law” for the Mint Theater Company. You can catch him inside the confessional on the second season of CBS’ “Evil.” This summer he premiered two plays in rep at the Contemporary American Theater Festival; find him this fall at Merrimack Repertory Theater doing “The 39 Steps.” And if you haven’t yet done so, enjoy clips of Tom briefing Ice-T about a murder or getting berated by Steve Buscemi at tomcoiner.com. “Kept sane only by the grace of my dog, Luna,” he adds.

2005

Jessica Dvorak Moyer, South Hadley, Massachusetts, updates, “I’m still teaching Chinese language and literature at Smith and just got tenure; my husband, Jarrett, teaches physics at Amherst. Alongside our two talkative kids Gabby (9) and Sam (3), we kept busy with this summer’s garden. Our September selves are always overwhelmed by getting so many vegetables right at the hectic start of the fall semester, but our March selves are never willing to plant less.”

2005

Elizabeth A. O’Dore, Berwyn, Pennsylvania, reports, “Life as a family of five in Philly is going well! We welcomed twins Josephine and Susannah in June 2021, and it’s been a whirlwind since!” Liz enjoyed summer fun at the beach with family and friends.

2005

David S. Waxman, Oakland, California, calls the last few years “pretty wild: After 12 years, I left the tech world and San Francisco for a quieter life in the suburbs of Oakland, where I’m now pursuing passion projects and attempting to remodel a home. (It looks more like demolition at this point.) Recently, I’ve been working with local politicians on how to improve the condition of our neighborhood’s deteriorating streets and sidewalks. Most days, however, you’ll catch me in the garden with my partner or out hiking in the hills with our dog, Pancake.”

2006

Jenna E. Brubaker, Hoboken, New Jersey, updates, “Big year for me and my husband, Adam! I started a new job, going back to my health-care roots with the health-care tech startup Olive; moved from Chicago to Hoboken; and last September celebrated my birthday by having a baby! Jonah is super into balloons, the fridge, the bath, giggling, banging on the piano and burping like a pro. Can’t wait to show him around Gambier someday.”

2006

Charmayne G. Cooley, Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, is in an emergency medicine residency in Detroit. “I’m continually reassured that this is the right field and perfect program for me,” she shares. “It’s such an honor to serve my patients in this community.”

2006

Debra L. Stone, Old Greenwich, Connecticut, writes, “I live with my wonderful husband, Ron Kim, and our faithful black cat. Attorney by day, ballet dancer by night.”

2007

Lisa King and Sam Shopinski ’06, Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, are “officially outnumbered,” she admits. “Isaac was born in January, welcomed by proud big brothers Owen (4) and Ethan (2). We got a minivan just in time.”

2007

Lauren C. Ostberg, Hadley, Massachusetts, rejoined the orchestra after a decade away — “pretty rusty!” — and is increasingly excited about the idea of writing essays in the form of legal briefs, she reports. Husband Benjamin F. Taylor started playing Go with their oldest son and “has gotten several Wordles in three tries.”

2007

Lilly Stolper, Providence, Rhode Island, updates, “Still trucking along as an emergency department nurse practitioner, hoping we’ve seen the last major surge in COVID cases so I can maybe go back to not wearing an N95 throughout each entire 10-hour shift!” This year, Lilly completed her post-master’s program and sat for her family nurse practitioner board exam. “I’m now (hopefully) done with academia forever and celebrating with a trip to the balmy Caribbean!”

2007

Amy Strieter moved to Athens, Ohio, to begin a doctoral program in creative writing. “I’m so happy to be just a few hours from Cleveland and Kenyon,” Amy writes. “I love being a student again and have been very delighted by my current coursework in Romanticism, centering around good old Frankenstein. Everyone: Read Wollstonecraft!”

2008

Christopher L. Loggins and Molly E. Loggins ’06, Jeannette, Pennsylvania, welcomed Jeremiah John Loggins to the world on Oct. 25, 2021. He joined big brother Christopher (5).

2008

David A. Rinehart and Carolyn W. “Cary” Rinehart ’12, New Albany, Ohio, welcomed a second son, Daniel, on Jan. 30. “He was delivered by another KC alum!” David notes.

2009

Aileen C. Caldwell, Milwaukee, started a new job as senior specialist, archives and heritage communications, at Northwestern Mutual. “Happy to continue a career as a corporate archivist,” Aileen writes. Recently, she and her partner, Drew, bought a mid-century ranch house. “Excited to begin the journey of homeownership!”

2009

Austin M. Faught, Memphis, Tennessee, works at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in the Department of Radiation Oncology. “Our son Eric just turned 2, and Jackie and I marvel at how time has flown by,” he reports. “We love spending free time at the local parks and zoo. I look forward to bringing him to Gambier for the first time and sharing with him the many memories that formed my Kenyon experience.”

2009

Emma K. Wampler, Lynnwood, Washington, moved out of user experience research to begin as a clinical research coordinator for the University of Washington’s cardiology clinical trials unit. “I’m excited to be involved in research that has such a direct impact on people’s lives! Also excited, after two years of work-from-home, to be seeing people in an office again!”

2010s

2010

Rachel A. Burgreen lives in Austin, Texas, with her partner, Stefan, and two dogs. “I’ve spent the past year expanding my therapy practice and have added two clinicians to my team!” she updates. “We also purchased property in Bentonville, Arkansas. My partner is a competitive mountain biker and, if he has his way, he’ll get me out on the trails there, too.”

2010

Julia L. DeNiro, Greensboro, North Carolina, is a data governance specialist working for Cardinal Health.

2010

Alexandra C. Shaeffer left Cleveland after serving as a program director at John Carroll University and moved to Maine with her husband, five cats and dog. “I work as a private education and research consultant for graduate students working on their dissertations,” she explains. “I miss Ohio but am happy to be out of higher ed.”

2011

Julia M. Ellingwood, Mason, Ohio, completed a master’s in public policy at the Hertie School in Berlin, Germany. “I’ve really loved the program here,” she writes, “and would highly recommend it for anyone interested in studying policy, particularly from an international perspective. Berlin is an amazing place to live and study. Outside of classwork, I’ve been working as a research assistant at the Berlin Social Science Center, mostly on child development, labor studies and political participation topics, and working as a stats TA at Hertie.”

2011

Jazz S.A. Glastra and Jeremy R. Abrams, Gambier, Ohio, welcomed daughter Lorna Josephine Abrams. “She just turned 1, and we are more obsessed with her than ever. Dara K. Frank visited us here in Gambier last fall, and we had a wonderful time picking apples and reliving our glory days (yeah, right). Jeremy is doing great as an associate at a Mount Vernon law firm, and I work remotely as director of program operations for BrainFutures, a national nonprofit that translates brain science to advance human potential. Right now we’re working on a big psychedelic medicine project. Wild! Jeremy is also coaching the Kenyon men’s rugby club.”

2011

Lucas C. Pastorfield-Li updates, “Still living in Austin, Texas, with the paladins, Samuel A. Graf ’16 and Andrew Jacob Tucker Smith ’21. Still working in international development. Just started a music and visual art collaborative here called PietschHouse (pietschhouse.com) and employing hard-core nepotism to get as many Kenyon artists in as possible.”

2011

Kayleigh E. Truman, Secaucus, New Jersey, updates, “This year has been massively challenging and eventful. Broadway is back, and I am able to continue working as an IATSE Local One stagehand in NYC. Last October, I got married to a dorky English adjunct and I’m astoundingly grateful for him. We got married at a local winery and had some of my favorite Kenyon people there! I also completed my master’s in labor studies from CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, researching Covid-19’s impact on stagehand mental health. Trained to become a mental health first aid instructor in March. Feeling fortunate!”

2011

Christine L. (Bullock) Wendell, Brooklyn, New York, reports that her startup, Pronto Housing, managed to raise its seed funding. Pronto’s software automates affordable housing leasing and compliance. “If you are in the affordable housing space, please reach out!”

2013

Michelle G. Birsky, Los Angeles, moved out of New York during peak pandemic, made her way to L.A. and began composing music for film, she updates. “I recently co-composed my first studio film called ‘Mother/Android’ with my partner Kevin, which premiered on Hulu in December. Though I will always be an East Coaster at heart, I enjoyed a sunny winter — what is this nonsense?”

2013

Kenneth J. Fedorko, Denver, completed his M.F.A. in acting from the FSU/Conservatory for Actor Training in Sarasota, Florida, before moving to Denver with Daniel J. Katz. “Focusing on all the things I wasn’t able to do as much during grad school: hiking, climbing, reading and writing.” He especially loved hosting William J. Plaschke and Nathan W. Huey for Willie’s bachelor party. He’s very excited to not know what’s next on his journey.

2013

Kelsey G. Jordan and her husband moved to the Cleveland/Akron area this summer after spending the last five years near Philadelphia. “I am excited to be returning to Ohio all these years later,” Kelsey notes, “and would love the opportunity to catch up with fellow classmates in the area. I’ve run a small video production company for the past seven years. Will take some time to rebuild in the Midwest, so I welcome any and all connections!”

2014

Aaron J. Stone, Ann Arbor, Michigan, shared the following: “After several grueling years, Aaron Stone defended their doctoral dissertation, ’Desires for Form: Modernist Narrative and the Shape of Queer Life,’ completing the requirements for their Ph.D. in English language and literature at the University of Michigan. They are looking forward to demanding obnoxiously that everyone refer to them as ‘Dr. Stone,’ which was their primary motivation for pursuing a Ph.D. in the first place.”

2015

Jacquelyn M. Garcia “is finally putting her degree to work after an extended stint bartending, and has transitioned into a role in marketing and communications for an international mountain guiding company based in the scenic box canyon ski town of Telluride, Colorado,” she reports. She spends every ounce of her free time out of cell service, recreating in the mountains and the nearby desert.

2015

Kathryn J. Kadleck relocated to Dubuque, Iowa, whose “blissfully hilly landscape and college-town status triggered many fond memories of life on the Hill,” she reports. Kate enjoys the new experiences of night markets, kayaking and walks along the mighty Mississippi.

2015

Rebecca N. Marcus married Christopher Toth at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas, on March 6, 2022, with Devon M. Beeny, Alexandra P. Britt, Emily C.P. “Ellie” Dawson, Sarah G. Lehr, Allen G. Sanderlin, Emily M. Smith and Mark M. “Michael” Harden Jr. ’14 attending.

2015

Mesa L. Owen lives in Norwood, Colorado, with partner Sherwood and their dogs. “We get outside as much as possible, whether it’s rafting, mountain biking or rock climbing. I got my master’s in social work last year and have started a small practice. Wish me luck!”

2015

Erich H. Slimak, Brooklyn, New York, finished his M.F.A. in poetry writing at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and moved back to NYC, his birthplace, where he works as “resident glue guy” at the Center for Fiction. He lives with “his partner Kate, their eggplant-shaped cat, and eight million roommates.” From his window, Erich can see the church where his twice-great grandparents were married. He was excited to play slap the bag and sing semi-poorly at Chasers Reunion in May.

2015

Samuel M. Teeter has been hanging out in Austin, Texas, with Nathaniel S. Katz and Hetty A. Borinstein while working for Cycorp, “a not-at-all-sinister artificial intelligence company that is attempting to re-create human common sense using a language of logical propositions,” he describes. “When I’m not doing that, I’m writing a novel about my great-grandfather and practicing medieval combat in the park.

2016

Joseph P. Duronio, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, attends medical school at the East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine.

2017

Christine C. Appleby, Arlington, Virginia, received her master’s in special education from Lourdes University in Toledo, Ohio, on May 7. Chrisie began work as an intervention specialist this fall.

2017

Caitelin F.K. McCoy, Bronx, New York, transitioned to a career in real estate, working as a salesperson and operations manager with the Bogard New York Team at SERHANT.

2017

Andrew T. Meeker, St. Petersburg, Florida, completed an M.F.A. from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia last year. Drew works in 3-D animation for a film studio under companies such as Sony, Warner Bros. and Marvel.

2017

Claire M. Naughton, Mundelein, Illinois, updates, “After a few years of bushwhacking through the freelance jungle after moving to France in 2018, without realizing I’d be staying (if you know, you know), this place that used to make me roll my eyes and feel like an outsider has become my home. I now run my own freelance writing business specializing in content creation for American and international clients across several sectors, including travel, education, language learning and small business professional. I also adopted a runty black cat who exclusively chews on leather shoes and my laptop charger cord for attention. She’s the light of my life.”

2018

Madeline Frank, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is in her first year of a dual master’s program in social work and public health at UNC. “Very lucky to have a whole Kenyon squad in the area!”

2018

Natalie S. Kane moved from New Jersey into New York City and is thrilled to be back working on in-person theater. She choreographed and assistant-directed a new musical, “Show Me Eternity,” for its premiere at the New York Theater Festival.

2018

Juliet E. Levy, who lives in Denver with her boyfriend and their dog, updates, “After earning my master’s in musicology from the University of Denver in 2021, I completed an internship with the company that makes Operabase and CueTV. Following that, I started a customer support position with MakeMusic (Finale/Garritan/SmartMusic) outside of Boulder. Support K-SWOC!”

2019

Jean-Louis D. Baillely, Chicago, reports, “I’ve been busy working in IT while also teaching music as a side hustle/hobby (jlmusicacademy.com). I spend a lot of my free time with friends, playing music and cooking new foods each week. I also enjoyed traveling to Central America to escape the cold while working remotely.”

2019

Christopher M. “Kit” Fluharty, La Jolla, California, was recently promoted to accounts payable finance manager at Verano Holdings, a publicly traded cannabis company.

2019

Annelise A. Royles updates, “I teach English at Gilman School and run an after-school program through an educational nonprofit called Bridges Baltimore. I’m loving Baltimore and all it has to offer!”

2019

Thomas P. Stanton, Williston, South Carolina, notes, “After graduation, I managed a small eLearning nonprofit based out of Baltimore called SmartyScholars. We provide academic assistance for Black and brown students in Maryland. Been pursuing my interests in private tutoring lately in Charleston, South Carolina.”

2020s

2020

Megan L. Collins, Burlington, Vermont, works for a company called Grand Slam Tennis Tours. “We sell luxury tennis vacations centered around watching professional tennis at the four Grand Slams. I love my co-workers, I love our ‘barn office’ in remote Stowe, Vermont, and I’m excited to see where it leads!”

2020

Lucas Kreuzer updates, “I’ve spent the last year and a half living in Vienna and rural Austria, teaching American culture and English in public high schools. It’s a pleasure to facilitate learning and cultural exchange with students every day, just as Kenyon taught me.”

2021

Lucas T. Ivey, Charlotte, North Carolina, updates, “My wife, Ellie, and I welcomed our daughter, Clara, on Sept. 16, 2021. She’s a wonderful baby, and we feel very fortunate.” Lucas completed a master’s degree at Vanderbilt this summer. “I’m still teaching world history and coaching multiple sports at Charlotte Latin School.”

2021

Daniel P. Riggins, Indianapolis, married Lauren Hall in summer 2021 and they were expecting their first child in May 2022. On the work front, Daniel is in a preventive medicine fellowship, which will enable pivoting from clinical practice into public health work. This requires splitting his weeks between Chicago and Indianapolis.

2021

Schuyler C. Bunn teaches middle school French in Louisville, Kentucky. “It’s been a crazy busy job, but I love it,” she writes. “Moving to a new city was hard, but my students make it worth it every day. I’ve also gotten to see a few other alums since we graduated! Kathryn M. Dawdy, Katherine E. Reber and Katherine H. Regan-Loomis came down to visit, and we had a blast. I also visited Andrew C. Savidge and Ali L. Fox back in Ohio. Even though life in Louisville is different from life on the Hill, I’m very happy.”

2022

Celeste A. Ramirez Diaz, Pasadena, Texas, updates, “Since graduating from Kenyon in May, I have begun working as talent acquisition coordinator for Zachry/JVIC Industrial in the Houston area.”

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