1940s

1948

Ira Eliasoph, White Plains, New York, writes, “I am happy to say my health is good. I take no medicines. My four children and five grandchildren are all fine. My biography is moving along — my time at Kenyon an important chapter.” In June, Ira received an achievement award from the Department of Ophthalmology of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai for 71 years of outstanding service.

1950s

1950

“Closed my medical office in September 2020. Still swim three times a week. Sixteen great-grandkids. No other doctors in the family — lots of swimmers.”

Don R. “Skip” Clark, Roswell, New Mexico

1951

Myron C. “Mike” Schiffer reports he is “still holding forth in the lovely western Massachusetts town of Lenox, where I’ve lived since the late 1960s.” He celebrated his 92nd birthday in November.

1952

“After living next door to our son, John, for five years, Margy and I decided to move into a nearby independent living center. Our daughter, Diane, packed us up for the move and unpacked us as well. A couple of weeks later, newlyweds Amy R. McKune ’84 and Kenneth E. Moncrieff ’85 came and hung pictures and wall hangings. After living in the Midwest for most of our lives, it’s great to be living in a blue state. I recently celebrated my 91st birthday.”

The Reverend John E. McKune, Williamsport, Maryland

1952

Charles P. Tranfield enjoys life in Keene, New Hampshire, and Shelter Island, New York. “Visits with our family are one of our favorite events,” Charlie notes. “Still playing bridge and reading.”

1953

“Closing in on my 90th birthday! Had an aortic valve replacement in July. Went into Hartford Hospital at 7:30 a.m. on a Monday and was discharged the next day at 5 p.m.! Continue to spend six months in Connecticut and the other six in Charlotte, North Carolina.”

Thomas H. Bott, Torrington, Connecticut

1953

Dominick M. Cabriele, St. Petersburg, Florida, urges, “Name the football stadium after Stanley Jackson ’52 and Allen Ballard ’52, the first African Americans to enter Kenyon. How about honoring the first undefeated Kenyon football team of 1950?” Editor’s note: Read last year’s Kenyon Collegian article about them and their 1949 team taking a stand against racism, or President Sean Decatur’s take on the topic.

1957

“For many years, our class notes have been prepared jointly by Henry Steck and me. But this year, because of time constraints, I did so alone. I hope Henry will forgive me.”

Donald A. Fischman, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania

1958

“I believe it is time to think about changing the school’s nickname/mascot! Lords and Ladies just don’t cut it in today’s world. Maybe that is why the athletic teams don’t do very well. Time to come up with an aggressive nickname — much like Amherst did a few years ago when they went from Lord Jeffs to Mammoths. Even the Williams College women’s soccer team adopted the Purple Cow as its mascot. Do any alumni think this should be pursued?”

Sheldon M. “Shelly” Fisher, Denver

1959

Lawrence R. Los, Santa Maria, California, reports, “Life is great here — no snow or cold weather.” Larry writes he is still in good health, married 57 years and still in love. “Kenyon did it all for me. Thank you, Philander.”

1959

“I visited H. Alan Wainwright and his wife, Nancy, now retired in Gambier. I was not only treated to a 28-24 Kenyon football win over Oberlin but a tour of the new Chalmers Library. I think Chalmers is the fourth iteration of Kenyon libraries for me since my first in 1955, Ransom Hall. I might have been the most senior alum at Homecoming. May try to attend the Bicentennial in 2024 and persuade my NYC dining partner David A. Grogan — Bronx baker of renown — to join me. If so, he might become the oldest returning alum.

Robert B. “Bebop” Palmer, New York City

1960s

1960

“I’ve been a widower since 2012; happily retired from many years teaching at the University of Rochester; continue to spend my time reading, writing, gardening, hosting my three children and six grandchildren. Grateful to remain vertical.”

George Grella, Rochester, New York

1960

“I have been thinking lately about how much my life was enriched by Kenyon. Great teachers like Denny Sutcliffe and Philip Timberlake left me with unforgettable memories. One of my best memories was meeting Robert Frost, who accepted John Crowe Ransom’s invitation to speak on campus. After getting a master’s degree, I worked for over 50 years as a librarian. A simple life, full of gratitude to Kenyon College.”

Philip C. Levering, Yaphank, New York

1960

“After four years of storm chasing in Tornado Alley, I finally saw a twister near Vernon, Texas. But I also ran into a hailstorm that cracked the windshield and dented the car. I plan to chase again in 2022.”

Brent E. Scudder, New London, New Hampshire

1961

“In early August I had the good fortune to be able to return to Kenyon. I was greatly impressed by the new West Quad, which seems to be a marvelous facility. It also seems to fit in well architecturally. I had a nice visit with John R. Knepper ’62, who happened along as we were walking up Middle Path. I am still composing poetry every day, putting some of it up on Facebook. The best news: My wife, Patty, is able now to play with the Waynesboro Symphony Orchestra. So there is again music in our lives.”

Daniel O. Holland, Waynesboro, Virginia

1962

“After 54 years with a home in New Jersey, I have finally sold my condo there. I now live full time in lovely Sarasota, Florida. Life is good.”

Charles E. Albers

1962

Thomas J. Hoffmann, Gambier, Ohio, reports: “Jan and I are just fine, fully vaccinated, three each and flu shots. Kenyon and Gambier have been very careful, and it shows. Knox Community Hospital is stressed, but more than 95 percent of students are fully vaccinated. Gambier requires everyone to wear a mask indoors. The students even wear them walking down Middle Path! The best part for us is the return of sports.” Tom and Jan are a host family for two women’s tennis players from Venezuela and Scotland. “They keep us young,” he writes. “A major project for me is working to get ODOT to reduce the speed limit on Quarry Chapel Road from 55 mph to 35 mph. After over a year, the end is not in sight, but good community support. I turned 81 last month and decided it is time to scale back my trademark law practice. I am transferring my clients to a new firm.”

1962

Steven S. Fischman, West Newton, Massachusetts, writes of a recent meeting with President Sean Decatur: “It sure seems like Kenyon is in great shape. On Oct.12, a small group from Boston had dinner together: Graham Gund, Nuff Withington, David A. Schmid ’64, Barry C. Jentz ’64, Thomas C. Bond ’64 and me. I am in regular touch with great old friends Stephen C. Weingrad and David B. Dawson — can’t believe we are 80. I continue to work in real estate. Disappointed to report I have three grandkids at University of Michigan but still have hope for the last. We divide our time between the Boston area and Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.”

1963

Eugene Kraus, Chicago, was laid off as an usher at the Chicago Symphony in March 2020, he writes, and then “spent much of lockdown with a lady in Pensacola, Florida, whom I met online. Didn’t work out, so I got two Modernas and went to Panama for a couple of months.” Considering relocating there, Gene planned to travel South America from January to May.

1963

“I am finally traveling again, with an October trip to Chicago for several of its great restaurants. Continuing charitable work for United Way and Twin Cities Rise. Low-key celebrations with family and friends for 80th birthday. Five grandkids under 10 keeping us busy.”

Robert W. Macdonald Jr., Minneapolis

1963

Neal M. Mayer, Millsboro, Delaware, reminisces, “Our lives can be changed by seemingly small and random events. I want to thank David Lloyd Evans for asking me to drive 185 miles to Western College for Women in the spring of 1962 with the promise of introducing me to a nice Jewish girl. When I noted on Facebook that Jane and I were celebrating our 58th wedding anniversary, Dave wrote, ‘We were all astonished at the instant combustibility between you both.’” Neal and Jane enjoyed having their four children and twelve grandchildren — including granddaughter Mia K. Tsuchida ’25 — visit for Thanksgiving and an early celebration of his 80th birthday.

1963

“We continue to be healthy and energetic. Barbara restarted teaching tai chi classes as folks got vaccinated and became more comfortable with group engagement. I continue with engineering and repair services at Beverly Hills High School, my 51st year working there, very part time. The bulk of my time seems to be with activities at our church — not that I’m heavily religious, but the campus is five and a half acres, with numerous buildings and loads of opportunity for repairs and upgrades. Can’t imagine a better way to stay active.”

David H. “Dusty” Stiles, Northridge, California

1964

“Linda and I are enjoying our retirement immensely — mine for five years and Linda’s for nine months. This summer we had an adventurous and exhilarating 300-mile bike ride in northern Idaho. Pickleball has become our favorite exercise, and we play most days. Even though we live in Boise, we have a townhouse in Petaluma, north of San Francisco, where we visit our four adult children who live in the SF Bay Area. No grandchildren yet, but four grand-doggies.”

David S. Gullion, Boise, Idaho

1964

“Here we are tiptoeing toward 80! A couple of years ago our daughter, director of a major lab at Georgia Tech, decreed that we would no longer spend the winters at our farm in the mountains of Vermont, with its ca. 1800 house five miles from the nearest village. Damn, it’s irritating when your kids are right. As a result, we now split our time about evenly between the farm and a retirement community adjacent to the Emory campus in Atlanta. I feared moving there, but it has been surprisingly wonderful. I no longer ride my bike thousands of miles a year on grand trips and Nancy has memory issues, so we sit in our rocking chairs contemplating interesting, productive and fulfilling lives.”

Philip J. Harter, Decatur, Georgia

1966

William E. Campbell reports that he and Suzy and are “still hanging on in Hudson, Wisconsin, dodging COVID — successfully so far. I consult with colleges and universities a little and turn a lot of wood into bowls, vessels, bottle stoppers and other pieces. My local gallery featured my work in a recent show. Extremely gratifying. And they sold a lot — that’s gratifying, too.”

1966

William P. Rice, Duxbury, Massachusetts, enjoyed returning to the Hill on Oct. 1 to celebrate “55 cause we’re still alive,” he jokes. “With great organizing by Lawrence F. Leventon, about a dozen of us made the trek for a very enjoyable weekend, which included a dinner at the Kenyon Inn, a seminar with author Paul Frederick ‘Fred’ Kluge ’64, and a farewell dinner at the Alcove (yes, it is still there). The first thing I saw as I approached campus was a tall construction crane. While many of the buildings we knew back in the ’60s still exist, the breadth of change is stunning. Many of us wandered down to the areas surrounding the KAC and were stunned to see acres of fields for every sport imaginable.”

1967

Arthur H. Stroyd Jr., Pittsburgh, continuing to actively practice law at his own firm, has been appointed by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to the board of a security fund that reimburses victims of dishonest attorneys. Art was also elected to the board of an educational foundation that awards scholarships to students in the field of material handling.

1967

W. Michael Weaber retired in April as CFO of Houston-based Smith & Associates, he reports. “It’s the final step in my career, which included 29 years at Bayer AG in the U.S. and Europe. My wife, Marthann, and I moved to Houston in 2002 from Connecticut to enable more time on the golf course and less with a snow shovel. As a ‘Koke Klassic,’ I am delighted with the great success of the Kokosingers.”

1968

“Like around 160 of us who were at Kenyon in the year 1968, I have just turned 75, grateful to have reached that marker more or less intact. I continue to read eclectically if not fluently in several languages, to putter in a garden, to tutor and to volunteer at my parish church. Also trying to break the habit of responding to every single political or environmental appeal that shows up on my screen. And to ponder what to do with the next 10 years that will leave a few pockets of the landscape just a bit better off, or at least no worse, than I found them. I am still helping to plan a final interment of John Owen’s ashes near the Trinity Pawling School, where his parents taught for many years, and where John grew up. Tentative date: alumni weekend there, June 2022.”

Eric E. Linder, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

1968

Gary L. Nave, Bedford, New York, shares that he and Linda welcomed a second grandson in May, son of Gregory L. Nave ’04. “This makes five so far,” Gary reports. “Son-in-law R. Justin Thoms ’98 helped coach his daughter Ruby (’30?) at a Kenyon swim camp last summer. Alexandra V. Thoms ’23 was also on campus after having won a Summer Science Scholar award to study molecular biology. Our youngest daughter, Ellie, was married in September. Our real estate business (rentals in Manhattan) has fully recovered from the pandemic.”

1968

Raymond S. Pfeiffer, Clayton, New York, continues to spend his summers on the Punts Islands in the Thousand Islands of the St. Lawrence River, off Gananoque, Ontario, and travels each winter. He has published articles in Thousand Islands Life.

1968

“Since retiring last June as director of real estate assets of the Christian Science Center in Boston, I’ve hung out in Chicago, Burbank, various parts of Colorado and Tulum, Mexico. I enjoy fly-fishing — Pierce E. Scranton Jr. and I have landed some fine trout together over the last year. I also consult with various church congregations that are looking to leverage their real estate to provide additional income for restoration or expansion.”

Jack D. Train, Burbank, California

1969

“After 44 years of practicing law I am finally on the path to retirement. It’s been a heck of a ride: assistant district attorney in Nashville, chief of staff and counsel to a U.S. congressman, lobbyist for the city of Nashville and — for the last 33 years — a partner at my own firm, where I’ve focused on personal injury and employment law. I’m looking forward to continuing work as a member of the Board of Governors of the Tennessee Trial Lawyers Association and taking on new challenges as a Stephen minister at our church. Mary and I planned a vastly increased travel docket, starting with a trip to Bordeaux in October and Park City, Utah, in November.”

Douglas S. Johnston Jr., Brentwood, Tennessee

1969

“I am still retired (20 years), still married to Diana (for 50 years), with 10 grandchildren. Still singing in a community choir, birdwatching when I can and hanging out virtually with Kokosinger friends. I’m working part time as a caregiver for elderly men — though some are younger than I am — which is the best job I’ve ever had.”

John P. Leslie II, Levittown, Pennsylvania

1969

“This past August, my wife, Andrea, and I got a pleasant surprise during an Alaska cruise on which I was a guest lecturer — meeting Robert A. Legg ’65 of Athens, Georgia. We were on the same trivia team. Although Bob graduated three months before I arrived, we had a great time talking about mutual friends and fond memories of Gambier.”

William M. Lokey, Tacoma, Washington

1970s

1970

Robert C. Boruchowitz, Seattle, received the Innovation in Criminal Justice Education Award as Seattle University’s Criminal Justice, Criminology and Forensics Department Advisory Committee Member of the Year. Further, Bob reports, “A paper I prepared with research assistants on racial disparity and public defense in Washington was included as an appendix in Race and Washington’s Criminal Justice System: 2021 Report to the Washington Supreme Court.” Bob is director of the Defender Initiative and a professor at Seattle University School of Law.

1970

“Some days it feels like I’m 73, some days more, some days less. Both ’20 and ’21 were eminently forgettable years. Semi-retirement is great — I’m working less and increasing my fees. Everyone is healthy and working. One college freshman, another bound soon. Lots more in a few years. Anybody got a nice Studebaker for sale?”

Peter A. Fluchere, Milton, New York

1970

“Last year, some caterpillars, but no evidence they survived and transformed to butterflies. This year, saw more caterpillars and decided to harvest them, hatch them and release. With no experience but lots of good tribal knowledge from those who have tried this, Susan and I successfully raised (inside our house!) and released two dozen, just in time for the annual migration. More milkweed being planted to be ready for next year.”

William F. Paraska, Alpharetta, Georgia

1970

“I have made my living as an artist since graduation, showing in galleries and making large public sculptures around the country. This pandemic year, I showed six-by-eight-foot photos, eight-foot sculptures and small bronzes at the Shirley Fiterman Gallery in NYC. Showed the mosaic palm columns I made in the 1970s at Landcraft Park in Mattituck, Long Island. I was also fortunate to carve a 24-ton stone sculpture for a client in Florida. From 3-D models I scanned, the piece was computer-carved from two found stones, then shipped to Florida on two flatbed trucks.”

Edward L. “Ned” Smyth, Shelter Island, New York

1971

Jonathan Alspaugh and his older sister have moved to a retirement community: Wesley Village in Wilmore, Kentucky, just south of Lexington. “The people are friendly, and the food is excellent. I’m one of the younger residents, but that won’t last long!” he writes.

1971

Sante Matteo, Oxford, Ohio, participated in two “Kenyon from Your Couch” events, viewable on YouTube. The first is “An Odyssey Back to Gambier,” and the second is “Poetry Across the Ocean,” in which Sante moderated a conversation between poet Daniel Mark Epstein ’70 and Professor of Italian Simone Dubrovic, who translated Daniel’s “Dawn to Twilight: New and Selected Poems” into Italian. Professor Dubrovic, who previously worked with Sante at Miami University before being hired by Kenyon, also edited Sante’s last book, “Il secondo occhio di Ulisse: Saggi di letteratura e cultura italiana” (2019). Watch a roundtable discussion (in English) of the book (written in Italian) at the “Italian Borderlands” symposium sponsored by the Calandra Italian American Institute.

1971

Robert C. Patrick reports that he and Martha are enjoying their yearly combination of two months in their Rhode Island loft and ten months in their house in Bodrum, Turkey. “We are part of an international community known as the Herodotus Academy of the Third Age,” he explains, “a group of about 500 people who meet in small groups to pursue activities and travel, enabling us to get to know people from many countries. I help lead the walks program, and Martha coordinates activities for members representing Turkey and many other countries. Such an international organization — one we have always, unknowingly, sought.”

1972

“Like everyone, I’ve been dumbstruck by the whirlwind of the last 18 months. I’ve gone from a fast-paced career in the wine business and monthly musical gigs to a year of furlough — retirement prep? — then to actual retirement. Thank goodness my immediate family has stayed healthy and basically sane. The neighbors haven’t stormed the gates in protest of all the guitar playing. My wife still laughs with me — and at me when it’s appropriate. We look forward to a future that will allow us all to flourish, one filled with wonder, and not the head-shaking kind.”

Frederick H. Alles, Escondido, California

1972

Paul J. Cain, Napa, California, retired in November 2020 after practicing orthodontics in Bay Shore/Brightwaters, Long Island, since July 1979. “I now work part time at Raymond Vineyards in St. Helena, California,” he reports. “Three days per week still allows time to work on my rusty golf game and explore this beautiful part of the country. Have enjoyed keeping in touch with Bruce V. Mavec and recently visited Stephen G. Walk ’73 and his wife, Allison, at their new home in Easton, Maryland.”

1972

Ira H. Dorfman updates, “I’m sad to report that in April I lost my wife, Suzanne Kurcias Dorfman, twin sister of Martin R. Kurcias ’71, to cancer. I met Suzanne on my first day of college in Gambier. Marty was my freshman-year roommate.” Moving from Maryland to Washington, D.C., Ira has ended his five years of leading the nonprofit Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition and will now pursue a new venture, Innovative Rail Technologies, a company manufacturing zero-emission battery electric locomotives. “I plan to retire in time for our 75th reunion,” he notes.

1972

David S. Ferguson, Middletown, Delaware, works as a tour guide at the Air Mobility Command Museum at Dover Air Force Base, he reports. “We have 35 aircraft, including a C-5A (the largest plane in the United States military), available for tours (including inside some). If you are ever on your way to or from the Delaware beaches, stop by for a tour.”

1972

Barry Gross, Media, Pennsylvania, and his wife, Joanne Green, welcomed their first grandchild, a boy, in August. “Still practicing law and trying cases,” he writes. Lawrence R. Harbison has returned to Ann Arbor, Michigan, after 40 years in NYC, editing anthologies for Applause Theatre and Cinema Books. Larry is writing a memoir titled “200 Times a Year.” “That’s how often I used to go to the theater,” he explains. “Eventually it will be published, but for now I am posting chapters on my blog at playfixer.com.”

1972

Edward J. Straub, Bexley, Ohio, reports, “Many of you know I was a married student at Kenyon — both my children were born before I graduated.” Ed and Sheila’s daughter is Shannon Straub Davisson ’93. After retiring in February, Ed and Sheila plan to relax in their newly purchased home at Apple Valley Lake in Knox County.

1973

“With my initial partner at Dover Family Physicians, we started the Department of Family Medicine at Kent General Hospital. I will continue to be involved with the Medical Society of Delaware. Since 1996 I have been president of MedNet, a subsidiary of the Medical Society, empowering physicians in contracting with insurance companies. Elaine and I have been married 40 years. Our daughter is a veterinarian in West Virginia, and our son is a stunt actor/producer in NYC. We plan on traveling more in our RV, visiting the grands, playing more golf and having fun.”

Michael J. Bradley, Magnolia, Delaware

1973

“I was born to retire! Even though I am saddened by a world that seems to be going to hell in a handbasket, I do what small amount I can to care for others. Becky and I are being much more intentional about connecting with friends and family. My volunteer work centers on being a docent at the Cleveland Museum of Art, singing in a community chorale and serving on a couple of art/music-oriented boards. I run a men’s group at the retirement community where I worked for 20 years, visiting people whose lives have been turned upside down by COVID. We have three grandsons, ages 2 to 6; two are in Portland, Oregon, and one has recently moved back to Cleveland — a seven-minute drive away.”

William Kevin Fuller, Cleveland Heights, Ohio

1973

“Long retired from my days at Korn/Ferry International and as caregiver to my parents, in October I headed to Arlington National Cemetery to inter my mother’s remains with my dad’s. My brothers and I will now be able to complete this chapter, postponed due to COVID. I reached out to Patricia M. Eanet for a mini-reunion, which grew to include Amy (Goodwin) Aldrich and Anita T. (Guttenberg) Harvas. My days are spent writing, teaching sensory awareness and meditation, and slowly getting out and enjoying New York City’s culture, the parks and my ritual walk around the reservoir, sometimes with Jan (Stein) Guifarro. Facebook has been a great connector! Shout out to Ann Starr, Julia (Miller) Vick, Andrew M. Brilliant, Ellyn R. (Greenspan) Leverone and Bonnie Levinson, among so many others for their sharing and kindness. I’m thinking of dear Anne E. (Lacy) Trevor, gone now twenty years.”

Shelley A. Hainer, New York City

1973

“I’m living in a small, southeast Alaskan native village, where I retired 15 years ago as their postmaster. The fishing is the best in the world. Am making guitars out of the Sitka spruce from this island. Currently doing grandpa day care because of the ripple effects of the virus.”

Peter W. Schneeberger, Hoonah, Alaska

1974

“You know how we all went through that period for a few years after graduation — that period of lots of weddings, when lots of friends got married? Well, now we have entered that other period: lots of funerals. Parents, friends, classmates ... Oy! We are still alive, happy and well in Michigan.”

Tom Neely, Grand Rapids, Michigan

1974

Hal Real, Rockland, Delaware, is a proud co-founder of the National Independent Venue Association, creator of the #SaveOurStages movement, which helped direct $16.5 billion in federal relief grants to live performance venues, museums, zoos and aquariums. His nonprofit music venue, World Cafe Live in Philadelphia, reopened on Sept. 29, 2021, after being shuttered since March 13, 2020.

1975

“After putting out an album of mostly my own material in time for my 65th birthday — James C. Fenhagen ’76 is on a few songs — I became excited to make even more music in my old age. Not ready to completely retire from accounting work, I changed firms in January 2020 to a firm that would give me total flexibility to come and go as I please. We had a new kitchen completed two weeks before the lockdown, so we’ve been making great meals and enjoying wonderful wines. Michele and I are also lucky to have our kids, Dara K. Frank ’11 and Elana, living near us in Manhattan. I’m working on new music, recording in the studio — see Facebook, YouTube or peterfrankmusic.com — and playing live gigs again. I’m also active on a few nonprofit boards, which I love. I’ve been able to get together with Jim and Irving J. Gotbaum and see Smilin’ Dog members Philip S. Soltanoff and James R. Fryman on occasion, too.”

Peter H. Frank, New York City

1975

John K. Henderson Jr., Westport Island, Maine, reports that after 14 years in civil litigation as corporate counsel, he discovered “the best practice there is — 23 years as state and federal public defender trial attorney in Kansas and Colorado.” John then retired to Maine to be five minutes away from his grandchildren, 18 months and 3.5 years. “Busy boating, flying and teaching little munchkins about Plato and Locke,” he describes. “Also writing land-use law blogs on metro district abuse in Colorado and a weekly column in the local paper.”

1975

Charlotte “Shami” (Jones) McCormick, Winter Springs, Florida, who remains the Wandkeeper at Universal’s Wizarding World of Harry Potter in Orlando, writes, “I am doing a lot of collaborating on children’s books. At home, I rescue injured ducks and am happy to be known as ‘the duck lady.’ Our three boys are doing well in Park City, Utah; Geneseo, New York; and D.C. Dan and I became ecstatic grandparents in August 2020; Rhys Daniel McCormick has opened up a whole new world for us.”

1975

“After a series of romantic fool’s errands and misadventures in 2020 that brought me to the pandemic-blighted hipster mecca of Asheville, North Carolina, by year’s end I met a breath of fresh air and a tonic for road-weary spirits in the delightful form of a woman named June. In November, we began a conversation through the Match portal and might never have met had she not extended her search range to North Carolina! A Thanksgiving visit melded with Christmas, and we were soon engaged and married in mid-March. Now happily exploring life in a different key.”

Philip B. Olmstead, Montgomery, Alabama

1975

Ann (Henschel) Seed, Kailua Kona, Hawaii, and John L. Seed ’74 have been riding out the pandemic on the Big Island of Hawaii, she reports. “It has been awesome to swim in the ocean and dine outdoors year-round. I’ve joined the ReefTeach program at a local snorkeling bay, educating tourists about the importance of using mineral-based sunscreen to protect our coral reefs. We hope to return home to Maryland next spring.”

1975

Paul A. Silver, Silver Spring, Maryland, continues to work at George Washington University, seeing patients and teaching, but cut back his hours, he explains. “I spend a good deal of my time trying to convince the skeptical of the utility of vaccines and masking. Last summer my daughter, her husband and three children moved in with us, so we are now four generations — from my 98-year-old father to my 2-year-old grandson. Seeing my dad and his great-grandson talk to each other is particularly cute.” Paul and Shelly have 15 grandchildren, the oldest a new high school graduate spending the year studying in Israel. “I hear Vicki Barker ’78 giving her CBS radio news report from London most mornings on our local news radio station.”

1976

David E. Griffith, New Hope, Pennsylvania, serves as executive director of Episcopal Community Services in Philadelphia and chairs the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, along with serving on the boards of several companies. “Retirement is much harder than I thought,” he writes. “Jacqueline (McEwen)-Griffith ’77 and I continue to see a number of classmates and marvel at how none of us are getting old.”

1976

“We recently sold our 223-year-old row house in Philadelphia, moving a few blocks west and north to an apartment on Washington Square as our city place. We have the pleasure of seeing Independence Hall every day. I’m doing lots of fiber art, singing in our small but mighty St Peter’s Philadelphia church choir, walking our beach collecting sea glass and watching/reading British cop/crime/mystery stories. We love connecting with our classmates in person or by Zoom or telephone, recently including David E. Griffith, Elizabeth (Murdock) Myers, James A. Frank, Christopher G. Carey, Amy (Magida) Haskell, Richard K. Haskell, Kenneth S. Thompson, and James M. Borgman.”

Leslie (Hollenbaugh) Ross and Peter Ross, Eastham, Cape Cod

1976

Susan L. Shackelford, Cincinnati, returned home from a New Mexico trip with Susan C. Durham and Karen M. (Templeton)-Somers. She also had “a short but sweet visit here in Cincinnati with Belinda (Rankins)-Swire and her husband, Gil,” she reports. “My life is certainly made richer by my friendships forged at Kenyon.”

1977

“It’s the first time in four years we have not had to deal with smoke or fire threats in our beautiful Pacific Northwest autumn. I’ve returned to the creative writing that originally sent me to Kenyon in 1973. A prose poem I initially penned in 2018 just as the Kavanaugh hearings were wrapping up is still in the works, but the wordsmithing is nearly done — just in time to address the latest onslaught of attacks on women’s rights via Texas. Recall that when we entered college in the fall of 1973, we were the first class of women to enjoy the benefits of a woman’s right to choose regarding reproductive rights.”

Linda (Isako) Angst, Portland, Oregon

1977

Rosemary P. (Williams) Begley, Louisburg, Kansas, continues to paint for Disney and will be signing at the Epcot International Festival of the Arts 2022 in the Disney Artist Tent.

1977

Rabbi Steven J. Lebow, Marietta, Georgia, is co-editing an anthology about his Kenyon advisor, Eugen Kullmann, along with Robert S. Schine ’72. The more than 30 contributors include Peter King, Miriam (Dean)-Otting ’74, Anthony J. LoBello ’69 and Sra. Virginia (Calhoun) de Millan ’80.

1978

Geoffrey G. Back and his wife retired to Beaufort, South Carolina, near two grandchildren, Caroline and Corbett, and their parents in nearby Mount Pleasant. “Our youngest daughter resides in Summerville, South Carolina, so we’re all situated near each other for the first time in quite a while,” he shares.

1978

“Retirement? What’s that? Still helping high performers and entrepreneurs worldwide eliminate mental and emotional barriers through modern rapid transformation. Busier than ever during the pandemic, as so many stepped off the hamster wheel, found their values and priorities clarified, and discovered they wanted something different! Grateful over these months for the strong friendships and community of Healdsburg (in beautiful Sonoma County wine country), and my rescue pup — first dog ever! — who have kept me grounded and sane.”

Holly (MacIsaac) Berkley, Healdsburg, California

1978

Rosemary Brandenburg, Altadena, California, urges all to check out the film ‘Spider-Man: No Way Home.’ “It’s the latest film for which I was set decorator,” she notes. “Now I’m back in Atlanta, decorating ‘Guardians of the Galaxy 3,’ due in theaters May 2023. One of these days I’ll retire, but in the meantime I’m working my butt off. It’s fun, most of the time! Altadena is a lovely area. Now I just need to be home more instead of on location so much of the time.”

1979

Jeffrey S. Day, Kensington, Maryland, became a grandparent on Oct. 4: “Theo Lanin Day, born in San Francisco to Annie Drury and our son Sam,” Jeff updates.

1979

“I have pretty much taken down the shingle after practicing law for almost 40 years. My wife and I now operate a small B&B in our home. Also keeping me busy is publishing a weekly community newspaper for the last couple of years. It has been fun to get back into journalism 45 years after Matthew A. Winkler ’77 fired me from the Collegian staff!”

Tom Ford, Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania

1979

Cameron R. Macauley, Harrisonburg, Virginia., started his fourth year as a psychiatric clinician in a hospital emergency room. “In 2018, I transitioned to this job from my former position as a university assistant professor,” he explains. Cameron and his wife, Angela, whom he met in Africa in 1994, celebrated their 25th. “Our son Alexander just graduated from high school and is taking a gap year before college, hopefully in a post-pandemic world.”

1979

Jeffrey Place, Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, continues working as curator and senior archivist for the Folklife Collections and Smithsonian Folkways Recordings at the Smithsonian. “In year 34 producing records and books,” Jeff updates. “Recently I co-produced a collection of California folk music and wrote liner notes for albums by Norman Blake and the bluegrass band Po’ Ramblin’ Boys. Since I am teleworking from here on out, I relocated a year ago to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Beach four blocks away; the sound, two. Enjoying the tiki bar life.”

1979

Gary D. Snyder reports, “I am excited to open a new gallery in Manhattan — Manhattan, Montana, population 2,000, that is! After over 20 years of galleries in New York City, I moved to Bozeman three years ago. I am opening a small gallery to showcase an artist I discovered, Ben Miller, who paints rivers with a fly rod.” See a cleverly executed and intriguing short film on him at benmillerartist.com.

1979

“After Kenyon I was a Marine infantry officer for five years, then defected to the Air Force to fly fighters (F-4 Phantom some; F-16 mostly). Beat working, but realized I’d probably need a job someday, so went to law school at SMU. Practiced as a corporate and M&A lawyer in London and New York for 20-odd years. Now back in Texas, working as an attorney-advisor to the Air Force in San Antonio. Full circle? Married now for almost 30 years to Alex Payne — Alexandra Gordevitch and Michael M. Sawyer know her from school days. We have two sons, Ashby and Christopher, both finding their way in the world.”

Howard Sutherland, Goliad, Texas

1980s

1980

“After almost 40 years in Fairbanks, Alaska, my wife, Joan, and I moved to Bend, Oregon. Downsizing is not for the faint of heart; it’s been quite the odyssey, but we are finally getting settled. If you enjoy being physically active, Bend is a good place. Vibrant arts scene and good restaurants. This winter we will volunteer as mountain hosts at Mount Bachelor, so grab your skis and ask for Doug and Joan in the geeky green uniforms.”

Douglas T. Braddock

1980

Quentin R. Hardy, Berkeley, California, published a piece in Town & Country on a famous painting in Siena, Italy, and has been giving online lectures on Renaissance art and technology, with parallels to today.

1980

“Heartbroken by the death of Mark H. Bistline last year. With Douglas B. Jacoby ’82, Lansdale M. Patterson, Mark A. Offerman, Ronald J. Link ’81, Douglas B. Dowd ’83 and Joseph F. Horning III ’83, we were all finally able to gather at his Rhode Island home in September to celebrate his very full life. A day and evening full of good food and drink, storytelling and live music — a party that Mark would have loved.”

Jennie (Hutton) Jacoby, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts

1980

Ethan M. Powsner, Grand Rapids, Michigan, now in his 23rd year at Fidelity National Financial, provides operational and financial metrics consulting to owners of title agencies, he reports. “Most of my work is in Tennessee and Kentucky. It’s a lot of fun and has taken many years to develop the necessary people and technical skills. On the literary side, a motorcycling magazine published my short story ‘Eye Contact: A Motorcycling Ghost Story.’ I also discovered pickleball in May and travel everywhere with my equipment.”

1980

Stephen R. Sexsmith, Hershey, Pennsylvania, married Judy Nourse on Oct. 9. “It’s been a long time since high school,” he writes, “but we found each other.”

1980

“I’ll be back out on location soon directing a new short film, this one in New Jersey on Sandy Hook beach and a nearby town. Called ‘Missing Her,’ it’s another darkly comedic look at nostalgia, which seems to be a theme of mine. I’m also honored to be working once again for one of my filmmaking idols, director Francis Ford Coppola, as a conceptual illustrator on a huge opus of a movie he’s been trying to make for more than 20 years called ‘Megalopolis.’ I can’t complain!”

Karl J. Shefelman, New York City

1981

Robin L. Bennett, Bellevue, Washington, writes, “After 37 years as a clinical genetic counselor at the University of Washington, I have a new dream position as professor of medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics and director of the UW Genetic Counseling Graduate Program.” She welcomed the first class of 14 graduate students in September. “In May, I had a wonderful lunch and gathering with my Kenyon apartment mates Susan C. Lamb and Clara (Church) Cohen in Connecticut.”

1981

Margaret P. Calkins, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, admits, “Dogs have kept me sane throughout the pandemic — both my goldens, Aquila and Tici (ages 16 and 9), and my dog-walking friends.” Maggie enjoyed a family reunion of descendants of the first Hugh and Ann Calkins, who came over in 1640 and were among the founders of Norwich, Connecticut. “My closest relative (besides my brother) was eight generations removed! Still working on research related to environments for people living with dementia, but looking to scale back to partial retirement someday soon.”

1981

Douglas Gertner, Denver, updates, “As the lockdown eased, I made a road trip to Gambier. Even with COVID protocols in place, I enjoyed seeing familiar sights and new buildings in process. Chalmers Library is as awesome as we’ve been told, and the new home of WKCO is impressive.” At an Alumni Council meeting, Doug and others were briefed by President Decatur on an exciting new partnership with the Schuler Education Foundation to create scholarship funds for low-income students through a matching grant.

1981

Dorothy Lenard, Bloomington, Illinois, is busy rehabbing and decluttering her parents’ house for use as an Airbnb. “Learning all kinds of things about landscaping and home maintenance!”

1981

Patricia D. Lynn, Haddonfield, New Jersey, retired after 28 years as a librarian at the University of Pennsylvania, with 35 years in academic libraries and 40 years total working in libraries. Patty volunteers at a nearby arboretum, among other things, and is loving retirement.

1982

“I managed to get married right before the lockdowns and travel restrictions to a fine Kenyon woman, Ellen (Wells) Buchanan ’85. Currently splitting our time between Lake Oswego, Oregon, and Middleburg, Virginia. Just added two Cardigan corgi puppies because it seemed like a great idea at the time.”

Richard T. “Buck” Buchanan, Purcellville, Virginia

1982

Grace (Keefe) Huebscher splits her time between Maryland and North Palm Beach, Florida, “technically retired but on the Freddie Mac board,” she updates. “I have been very active as a Kenyon Review trustee, which brings me back to campus more frequently than just reunions. Our kids are mid-20s, mostly out of the nest and thriving in Maryland.”

1982

Daniel M. Mechem, La Quinta, California, writes, “As we celebrate being redwoods and no longer seedlings, I thought I’d bring you up to date. My best friend died of skin cancer a year ago. To honor him, I started a nonprofit called SknVue, which quickly became one of the pre-eminent skin cancer prevention nonprofits in the world, partnering with the Tiger Woods Foundation, Boys and Girls Club of America, LPGA, PGA Tour, Girl Scouts and many more. In parallel, I was recently named CEO of a new company called NextLinks. We are building large arenas around the world, offering cutting-edge indoor golf and taking the experience of Topgolf to a whole new level.” Dan has been married 14 years to Eliana, originally from Bolivia.

1982

Hilary Quay (Sparks)-Roberts and her husband now live in Old Lyme, Connecticut, “after spending the greater part of our lifetime in Ohio,” she writes. “I happen to live next to a lovely fellow alum and English major, Christine L. (Amiot) Carter ’80.”

1983

Frederik S. Barends, Columbus, Ohio, who left Ohio State for the University of Michigan in 2018, updates that “OSU has asked me to return as director of operations for track/field/cross country. While I will miss my three-hour trip to Burt Lake from Ann Arbor, it is awesome to come home.”

1983

George H. Carroll, Needham, Massachusetts, enjoys watching 7-year-old Warren MacPherson Carroll (’36?) navigate the uncharted waters of first grade. He and Rebecca also celebrate a brand-new granddaughter, courtesy of eldest son Macpherson C. Carroll ’11 and daughter-in-law Prita (Kidder) Carroll ’11. “Got a call recently from Jebb S. Curelop,” George adds. “I always enjoy hearing from classmates.”

1983

“All is well in Wilmette, Illinois, with the Clark family. My son James moved from professional soccer to marketing and sponsoring LPGA and PGA events with a new company, Outlyr. My oldest daughter, Annie, following the path of her mom and dad, is in law school at Washington University, hoping to become a disability lawyer. My youngest daughter teaches computer coding to children. I spent the last year helping companies across the country develop their COVID safety and health programs. In September, I had a wonderful night out in Baltimore with Thomas G. Taylor ’80, William B. Cook ’81 and David Holeman. In June, I was proud to see Adam E. Reed ’15 and the Michigan Rattlers play the Lincoln Hall in Chicago — amazing what a classical music degree from Kenyon can lead to!”

Brent I. Clark

1983

Gregg O. Courtad, Salem, Ohio, saw his 1820 home featured in the Wall Street Journal in a June article about Underground Railroad buildings. “And I rescued a stray tuxedo kitten — or rather, he rescued me! Absinthe is so fascinated with running water that he now ‘assists’ with the laundry and the dishes at every opportunity,” Gregg notes.

1983

Kelly F. Doyle, Cary, North Carolina, traveled to Yokohama, Japan, in August to save the life of her dog, Izzy, through mitral valve repair surgery. “We were supposed to go in December 2020. She now has a perfect EKG and no detectable murmur. Mark A. Horikawa taught me a lot about Japan, and we had fun chatting while I was on lockdown. He gave me the best advice about how to survive a 14-day quarantine in a small apartment ordering Uber Eats delivery. When Izzy was released from the hospital and my quarantine ended, I was finally able to go out with my friend Atsuko to Sushi-ro. The nearby supermarket was so beautiful I literally wept tears of joy, taking pictures of the most gorgeous, colorful, healthy fresh food I’ve ever seen.”

1983

“I’ve become deeply involved in volunteering with a startup food recovery nonprofit. We rescue more than 5,500 pounds of perishable unsold food a week from grocery stores and get it to people who need it. The Collective of Lady Arm Wrestlers of Austin chose us as the beneficiary of its extremely campy arm-wrestling fundraiser showdown. It raised enough to buy us a new walk-in cooler, and I got to present Cherry Bomb with the top wrestler-fundraiser trophy, which I made from an old candlestick, a mannequin hand, a fake banana and a lot of glitter paint.”

Suzanne Hershey, Austin, Texas

1984

Peter C. Fischelis, Concord, Massachusetts, updates, “I became a grandfather for the first time — thoroughly enjoying it! Baby Lilah was born on May 4. (Yes, she will be hearing ‘May the fourth be with you’ for the rest of her life.) My wife and I have been skiing at Killington and enjoying our place in Strafford, Vermont. I’m still working in IT and coaching the varsity girls high school soccer team at Concord-Carlisle.” Peter was on track to get his 100th win this season, his team going 11-2-5 and undefeated in its league. “One of my players who graduated last year is playing for Kenyon this season. Over the last year, I’ve enjoyed Zoom calls with Kenyon soccer mates David F. Stone ’83, Garth A. Rose ’83, George H. Carroll ’83, Richard T. Klaus, Patrick B. Grant ’85, William H. Alderman, Patrick J. Shields ’85 and Coach Vennell.”

1985

Kathleen (Fulmer) Waller is in her fifth year teaching English learners at Columbus Preparatory Academy. “This year it’s all kindergartners,” she reports. “I remain hopeful that we can turn around the COVID academic slide.” Kathy enjoyed seeing Melinda D. (Roberts) Haines at a winery in south New Jersey, Katherine (Detwiler) Okabayashi at the German Club in Pittsburgh, and Emily Reidenbach at the Immersive Van Gogh exhibit in Columbus. “I continue to volunteer with my church and the DAR and have taken up plein air painting occasionally, which I’ve found to be much more challenging than I expected.” Kathy’s daughter Laurel J. Waller ’19 works as the sound designer for Short North Stage in Columbus.

1985

The Rev. Taylor W. Burton-Edwards, Columbus, Georgia, continues his passion for making ecumenical connections by serving as pastor of a small congregation in Warner Robins, Georgia, with the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He remains co-convener of the Ecumenical Consultation on Protocols for Worship, Fellowship and Sacraments, and is director of Ask The UMC, the United Methodist Information Service. Taylor also co-wrote and co-edited a new set of ecumenical resources for the catechumenate and mystagogy, published by Journey to Baptismal Living (The North American Association for the Catechumenate).

1985

Richmond H. Curtiss, Palm Springs, California, shared that after 14 years together, he and his partner, Mark Epoch, were finally able to celebrate their wedding on June 8, 2021. Rick and Mark quietly married in June 2020, but generally kept it secret until they could safely celebrate with family and friends in Palm Springs. Rick works as a naturalist guide for red-jeep.com, so he took his guests on tours of the local desert. Patrick J. Shields, New York City, shares that his “pandemically postponed 2020 wedding” to WSJ.com journalist Beckey Bright took place in Milton, Kentucky, in June. “Ivor Hanson, twin of Lars J. Hanson ’86, officiated,” he reports. “Kyle Primous, with the world’s most beautiful family in tow, stood in as best man.

1985

Mark T. Mashaw, Jennifer M. Mizenko and Laura A. Plummer danced like it was 1999. I continue to work as a background player on ‘Billions’ while waiting for auditions to pick up again. In the meantime, Beckey and I have begun post-production on our U.S. soccer fan documentary, ‘Eagleman and Wonder Woman: An America Love Story.’ Look for the Clear Window Productions Kickstarter campaign.”

1985

Camille M. Sweeney, New York City, with husband Josh and their daughter, Roxie (now 16!), has “accumulated way too many books during the pandemic,” she writes, “including my current fave, George Saunders’ ‘Lincoln in the Bardo.’” Camille runs a workshop program called Future Me, using research from her book, “The Art of Doing,” to help high school students connect their interests to jobs and careers. “Every time I have them write a letter from their Future Self (decades into the future) to their Present Self, thanking them for all their hard work, I think, ‘Wow, I wish I’d written a letter like that to my Future Self when I was back at Kenyon!’”

1986

“We were blessed with great weather, friends, family and no masks! We find ourselves active and busy, enjoying semi-retirement in the Adirondacks and Florida. Our boys are now young adults and living together in Scottsdale, Arizona. I often see Anne (Lafave) Mauck, Robyn (Williams) Shimrak and Cynthia (Richardson) Ryan. Every few years the B1 reunion is always filled with fun and laughter (and often a beach). I also went to see William W. “Wally” Danforth in his side gig, playing in a band, and Philip V. Moyles Jr. and I connect with marathon lunches in Manhattan as often as life allows. Adam R. Davidson keeps busy producing and directing some great new shows! We stay close to Byron J. Horn’s former wife, Kris, and their three adult children, who were all able to attend both weddings. David is doing some volunteer work fixing up the old Beta Temple.”

Wendy (Crabbe) Lingafelter and David B. Lingafelter, Chagrin Falls, Ohio

1986

“Life for Doner “Deke” K. Melone ’84 and me changed dramatically a year ago. Last fall we seized the opportunity to purchase my family’s beautiful lake home just outside Duluth, Minnesota. Deke works remotely full time, and I work part time doing the books for my church. We are thoroughly enjoying lake life.”

Christine (Budd) Melone

1988

Joanne “Jodi” Campbell has been enjoying monthly Zoom calls with Jean (Bayless) Albrecht, Nancy “Noel” (Chapelear) Rodgers, Shelly J. Rankin, Diana K. Olinger, Margaret (White) Bellefuil and Kevin S. Dehan. “My daughter Rachel graduated from Furman University in May 2020 with a degree in econ/public health,” Jodi reports. “For the second half of 2020 — COVID be damned! — she and I hauled a 15-foot A-Liner travel trailer to 25 states, seeing 15 national parks and covering over 10,000 miles. Visited Margaret in Seattle. Our adventure year then involved a three-month stay in Costa Rica, scuba diving every week. Since our return in May 2021, Rachel has moved to D.C. for her first job (and where I had a great visit with Diana). I relocated to Greenville, South Carolina, but still own my kitchen store, Cook on Bay, in Beaufort, South Carolina — and thanks to some fabulous employees, I was able to enjoy a fabulous year with my daughter!”

1988

Peyton S. Chapman, Portland, Oregon, writes, “We’ve been in the news for everything from BLM protests — beautiful, and not the cause of vandalism/conflict — to the ‘worst air quality in the world’ during the 2020 fires.” Peyton, principal of a large downtown high school, notes, “Our students walk out and testify regularly in support of climate justice, racial justice and to elevate awareness around houselessness, mental health, trauma and addiction issues, as well as the intersectionality of race, gender and sexual orientation inequities. I am both incredibly proud of them and fearful for our and their children’s futures.” Daughter Halle spent 15 months building a house in the Catskills woods—“a badass, using her artist and welding skills, with plans bought for $599 on the internet.” Son Alden, a high school senior, looks to play soccer at a rural Division III college in the East, and son Everett, a junior, enjoys skateboarding, doing flips off bridges into rivers, and “will only consider California colleges if he doesn’t make his first million on Snap or IG,” she quips. “My husband, Aubrey, is an urban artist/small farm manager, and we enjoy hosting sunset views.”

1988

“Just as COVID was starting to take hold, I opened a guitar building/repair business called Mars Guitars. Amazingly, it gained traction despite all the shutdowns and has continued to do well. It’s the best job I’ve ever had, by far—except for, you know, not making any money. Check me out at marsguitars.com.”

J. Mark Eberman, Silver Spring, Maryland

1988

Bruce A. Gerber, Worthington, Ohio, traveled to Huntington, West Virginia, in September to watch the son of Nelson T. Morris play football for East Carolina against Marshall, cheering along with James A. Hinkle ’87, Kent Wellington, Edward W. “Ted” Stewart, Bret R. Frye, David T. Mitchell and Darryl L. Shankle ’89. “We enjoyed the ECU come-from-behind upset victory and catching up with each other,” Bruce shares. “Mark Oliver Day made the trip the next morning to meet us for breakfast. Good times!”

1988

Tara L. Jones, Eugene, Oregon, describes her busy summer in the garden: “We harvested and processed pears, apples, elderberries, aronia berries, goumi berries, black currants, grapes and a variety of medicinal plants. Helping to install a drip irrigation system, a highlight of my summer, made me think about a career change.” Tara recommends an eight-week online class called The Work 101, based on “The Work” by Byron Katie, for anyone “looking for a tool to get yourself back on track emotionally when you find yourself going off the rails.” Daughter Sophia, now completing her materials science degree (minoring in physics), was offered a job as a graduate assistant in the department of nuclear engineering at Oregon State University this spring while she pursues her master’s.

1988

Melissa J. (Henderson) Koenig, Glen Ellyn, Illinois, reveled in working from home last year; the absence of a commute allowed her time to spend mushing with her 4-year-old husky, Rollo. “We were even able to attend a few races in Michigan — dog sports lend themselves to pandemic activities, as you naturally social distance outdoors.”

1988

With Molly working in Europe for four months this summer, I took the opportunity to fill the apartment with sawdust, building a new work-from-home desk and display shelves for my dozen manual typewriters out of steel pipe and antique cherry wood. Provide a land address — you might get a letter!

1988

“Life is good and very busy! In May we moved into a new home, then had back-to-back graduations all in the same week. It’s fun to have another Kenyon alum in the family! Carter M. Vivio ’21 is teaching Spanish at a boarding school in Virginia. Our younger son, Anthony, is happily settled in as a Purdue University freshman studying industrial design. I had visions of so much more time on my hands once we had an empty nest, but between work and volunteer gigs, the days are very full. I continue to enjoy frequent communication with James K. Sokol ’87, J. Edward Ball and Bradley R. Koogler.”

Beth (Miyashiro) Vivio, St. Petersburg, Florida

1989

Kristen (Bruno) McClusky, Montclair, New Jersey, writes, “My family has survived pandemic life without getting sick — or killing each other. I’m still at Apple News. Kids are in eighth and eleventh grades, so starting to think about college. My husband is hard-selling his alma mater, Carleton, but I’m optimistic our daughter will realize Kenyon is the obvious choice.” Kristen was looking forward to seeing Brenda B. Burman in December. Margaret (Tuttle) Robinson, Dublin, Ohio, moved on from teaching kindergarten for eight years into a role as a gifted intervention specialist serving K-5 students. She happily reports having completed her master’s of education with a focus on twice-exceptional gifted learners.

1990s

1990

Frederick S. Richardson and his wife, Jessica, moved to Austin, Texas. Fred shares that they miss Washington, D.C., even less than they thought they would.

1990

Todd P. Van Fossen, Middleton, Wisconsin, works as the chief of program finance for the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. “Also enjoying travel — even during the pandemic,” he updates. “I recently returned from an amazing weeklong trip to Central Europe.”

1991

“I’m now working as a senior energy analyst for the city of Ann Arbor’s Office of Sustainability and Innovations, sprinting at our goal of carbon neutrality by 2030. The work is exhilarating. Our two teenage daughters have managed as much resilience as can be expected through the pandemic, one now a sophomore at University of Michigan and one a high school junior. What little free time that all leaves is occupied by my garden, my friends and my tennis habit.”

Julie K. (Mills) Roth, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1991

Cornelia Kurtzman, Brooklyn, New York, joined the board of Badass Animal Rescue, an organization in its 10th year of saving dogs from high-kill shelters across the South. “Over the past decade we’ve saved 3,000 dogs — including my own three pups,” Nellie writes. “I highly recommend supporting your area rescue organizations. If you’re looking for a dog, please consider rescuing — #adoptdontshop. My day job is VP of marketing and publicity of children’s publishing for HarperCollins, and I love that, too.”

1991

Michelle (Van Etten) Lee, Ann Arbor, Michigan, reports, “Back from a wonderful weekend on the Hill, visiting Ann P. Russell and our alma mater. While she dutifully attended Alumni Council meetings, I biked 53 miles along the Kokosing Gap Trail and the Heart of Ohio trail — both lovely! Shelly works as a clinical psychologist at the University of Michigan, seeing clients, supervising trainees, running training programs and enjoying work from home. “Still with Morrie, my hubby of 24 years,” she adds. “Jonah’s now 17, and Aidan’s at Butler.”

1992

“For a mix of reasons, I decided to ‘retire’ from my job as a professor at Alma College in 2021. I am taking a yearlong sabbatical to regroup — and figure out what I want to be when I grow up! — until our kid graduates from high school and we can move to the Twin Cities to be near elderly parents in 2022.”

Kathryn D. Blanchard, Alma, Michigan

1992

James A. Carlone, Ooltewah, Tennessee, is in his 26th year teaching math at the McCallie School, his alma mater, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. “My school has done a very good job with COVID protocols, which I greatly appreciate,” Jim reports. “My son, William, is in seventh grade at my school — a blessing to have him so close. This year, for the first time, I am teaching the son of one of my former students! So this means two things: I have taught generations of students, and I am older than dirt!”

1992

“I am about to hit 20 years at my current job, where I manage financial systems and integrations. I have two kids in college and one at home. My oldest son is at Georgia Tech, and I am very excited that my daughter Mia K. Tsuchida ’25 has started at Kenyon! She is a triple legacy, after me and her grandfather — Neal M. Mayer ’63.”

Amy Mayer, Johns Creek, Georgia

1993

“I am starting my 17th year as the counselor at St. Andrew’s School in Barrington, Rhode Island. My daughter, Indigo (16), is a junior, and my son, Jude (13), is in eighth grade. We live in a campus house, and they both attend St. Andrew’s. It’s home and work. I also work as a therapist part-time in a private group practice, which has been great.”

Ann H. (Rittenbaum) Allain

1993

Sarah (Gimbel)-Sherr and Kenny Gimbel-(Sherr) ’95 of Seattle are thrilled that their eldest daughter, Lola E. Gimbel-Sherr ’25, is a freshman at Kenyon. “Looking forward to parents’ weekend and connecting with all the other alumni parents.”

1993

“We survived shutdown by splitting our time between the Bay Area and New Mexico. What kept me sane has been starting my Next Wave Leadership podcast, where I talk with leaders who have a passion to serve others and see their purpose as moving past the broken paradigms of patriarchal leadership to create healthy, holistic cultures where people thrive at work. I also had the good fortune to visit NYC last summer, where I connected and laughed a lot with my old Kenyon friends Michael S. Greenspon ’92, Christoper G. Calvosa ’94 and Daniel L. Lerner.”

Dov G. Pollack, Oakland, California

1993

David N.G. Whiting, Arlington, Virginia, and his family left the Philippines in March 2020 due to COVID: “We packed our bags and were on the plane in 24 hours!” he writes. “Back in Washington, D.C., I am still with the State Department and just finished a year working as chief of staff for the assistant secretary for international energy. In July, I moved to my current assignment, director of the China Division in the Global Engagement Center, the State Department office responsible for countering foreign propaganda and disinformation. Wish me luck!”

1994

Scott R. Baker, Gambier, Ohio, and his startup partner, Natalie Marsh, formerly of Kenyon’s Gund Gallery, formed a new nonprofit. ViVA, Virtual Visiting Artists, is designed to bring exceptional visiting artists to colleges, universities and other organizations virtually. “We’re a low-carbon, turnkey option for any organization feeling the pressures of budget and staffing cuts — or wouldn’t know where to begin to put together a compelling artist series on a topic like climate change or anti-racism,” Scott explains. “It’s fantastic to finally be public as a 501(c)3 after a year of building our organization from scratch during the pandemic.” Learn more at vivavirtualartists.org.

1994

James K. Feuer, Alhambra, California, just played his first recurring role on TV’s “A Good Cop,” which appeared in November. “Currently seeking representation, if you know anyone...?”

1994

Kathryn Foley, Adams, Massachusetts, completed 18 months of earning her state riding instructor license and PATH International credential as a certified therapeutic riding instructor. “Very intensive process with huge rewards — seeing my students blossom as they learn horsemanship and adaptive riding skills,” she writes. “The need in our area is great, and we have a waitlist already! Hoping to fundraise — anyone handy at this, give me a shout! — to get our outdoor arena covered so we are not at the mercy of the weather and can serve more students for a longer season.” Kathy’s psychotherapy practice mostly involves telehealth from her home office now. “My son is back at Champlain College, and my daughter is a senior in high school.”

1995

“My oldest daughter, Elyse R. Sommer ’25, started her college journey with Kenyon’s Copenhagen cohort. Navigating college admissions during a pandemic was tricky and then rewarding. Visiting her will be as fun as next year’s parents’ weekend. Only Copenhagen’s cobblestone streets and bike lanes can compete with Middle Path’s fall leaves.”

Lynne C. (Jarvela) Sommer, Aurora, Colorado

1995

Atieno (Fisher) Bird, Crozet, Virginia, combines executive coaching and mental health group facilitation with a few mom-and-pop businesses: crozettrolley.com, crozetrestorations.com and B&Bs. “Samia is 11 and Silas is 9,” she adds.

1995

Adam J. Singer continues to enjoy life in Israel: “Bought a Tesla last month,” he reports. “It’s been a ton of fun and a pretty big deal for our family. We didn’t have a car for the first three years here. Getting soooo much joy from the Class of ’96 Spotify playlist and reading Taylor M. Wray Jr.’s poetry.”

1996

Lauren Star (MacKay) Caplan, Redondo Beach, California, is in her “fourth year living in Los Angeles, my fifth year being married to Tyler A. Studds ’98 and my second year as an empty nester. All good things!” After earning her master’s in yoga studies at Loyola Marymount University in 2020, she is now studying for a postgraduate certificate in yoga therapy there. “At first I didn’t like Zoom for yoga,” she shares, “but now I realize it allows me to see yoga therapy students from all over, and without commuting! Get in touch if you’d like a reduced rate while I’m still in school — seriously, I need to practice on more folks! Tyler is involved in offshore wind here in California, as he was when we lived in Massachusetts. In June, Gigi Gomez and I took a trip in a truck to Taos and Telluride. We had lived there with Corey (Cook) Bartlett for a few months after graduating, and it made a huge impression on us. Our trip was another great adventure: whitewater rafting, hot springs, driving harrowing mountain roads and altitude adjustments!”

1997

Alisoun (Davis) Bertsch, Athens, Pennsylvania, has been talking to her eldest child about choosing Kenyon, though he is looking at large schools. Alisoun is taking a death doula course through the University of Vermont. “Coincidentally, a close family member is at the end of life. She said the other day, ‘Gosh, I didn’t mean to give you such context for your studies.’ Shout-out to Professor Rhodes for his Meaning of Death class and for being way ahead on this work. Best tip so far: Keep paying attention to your senses, turn toward suffering and look for the gifts that come with the difficulty.”

1997

Jennifer A. Churchill and her beloved Swiss shepherd, Elsa, love the lake life in Nisswa, Minnesota, “In November, we celebrated five years since I returned to my birth state,” she notes. “Living in a remote rural area provided many unexpected blessings, as my work travel was eliminated in 2020. I developed a deepened appreciation for where I live.” Her outdoor hobbies include fishing, golfing, cross-country skiing and open-water swimming. Meanwhile, her executive coaching practice grew. “Helping my client leaders adapt, evolve and find their own resilience during a very challenging time was humbling.”

1997

“In our fourth year living in the Pacific Northwest, we are loving all the great outdoor adventures at our doorstep. With my husband, Brian, and kids Graham (12) and Neve (7), I’ve taken some great road trips in the last year and a half: Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Wyoming.”

Shannon (Pierce) Cullins, Mercer Island, Washington

1997

“Mandy, like the rest of the world, has had a rough 20 months or so, but has so far come through with her health and most of her sanity intact. Her husband (Patrick) and children (Liam, 11 and Colin, 10) are also still alive and kicking, to her endless delight and gratitude. The entire family spent as much time as possible outside this summer, resulting in hundreds of photographs of remote hiking trails, dozens of poison ivy rashes and one overambitious vegetable garden that we reluctantly share with the local deer and rabbit populations. Singing indoors still isn’t safe, but curling season starts soon, so at least some (masked) fun will be had this winter.”

Mandy (Mason) Gadrow, Pickerington, Ohio

1997

Laura (Witek) McDonald has worked at Thomas Jefferson Independent Day School in Joplin, Missouri, since graduation — first as a science/math teacher and coach, and for a decade as head of school and college counselor. “What is even stranger to me than coming up on our 25th reunion,” she writes, “is that my son graduates from Oberlin this spring.” Although unable to recruit him for Kenyon, she confesses, this fall she did recommend her alma mater to a student, who emailed her: “You were right! Kenyon is a perfect fit. It’s beautiful here, and I’ve already made many friends.”

1997

Larae (Bush) Schraeder, Columbus, Ohio, concurs: “Hard to believe our 25th reunion is upon us. Some days it seems we left the Hill only yesterday.” Larae works full time at Nationwide in data and analytics while practicing law evenings and weekends at her own boutique estate planning and elder law firm. “When my client’s son was tragically murdered, we adopted his cat,” she shares. “I joke that my intake paperwork for new probate clients should read, ‘Did the deceased have any pets? If so, please know my household is currently operating at our quota!’ ”

1998

M. Lark (Cowart) Peterson, Saint Charles, Illinois, returned to government work as a child protection prosecutor in Kane County. “With COVID,” Lark writes, “more flexibility has let me continue to coach high school swimming and teach at a local university as an adjunct. I typically teach mediation, constitutional law, evidence and criminal procedure but recently added a course on human rights and responsibilities.” Husband Kevin, who works at Argonne National Lab, has been happy to work at home with Sean (7) and Meredith (4).

1999

“Ohio finally called me home. After 20 years in the San Francisco Bay Area, believing I would never leave, I moved my family across the country to Columbus, where I grew up. It took being a health-care provider during a global pandemic and climate change to finally push us out. We bought a house sight unseen without a Realtor in Bexley (a suburb of Columbus). We could never have done this without the help of Clare (Willoughby) Ceballos, who never gave up trying to get me to come back. And now my 7-year-old son, who is named Bexley, lives in Bexley. The name was an homage to a place we only thought we would visit. It’s been amazing to reconnect with Matthew O. Sullivan and Heather A. Doherty ’98 and be neighbors with Elisabeth A. Hire ’00.”

Bernadette (Kuhnsman) Donovan, Columbus, Ohio

1999

Emily M. Harris, New York City, updates, “During 2020, artist John DiLeva Halpern and I started the Institute for Cultural Activism International.” See instituteforculturalactivism.org and its numerous live interviews with cultural activists worldwide. “We also joined in the institution of marriage in September.”

1999

Kelly C. (Harkless) Lyles, Cockeysville, Maryland, and her husband, Rob, have identical twin daughters (10) and a son (13). “In 2016 I started an environmental consulting company, KLT Group,” she writes, “and have been enjoying the balance of the built and green environments.”

1999

Kara M. McClurken, Charlottesville, Virginia, writes, “In addition to my day job as director of preservation services for the University of Virginia Library, I have been moving forward on building a multigenerational playground.” Kara and Brian P. Gibney’s son, Bennett McClurken-Gibney, passed away at age 5 in 2018. “Bennett’s Village will be the first all-abilities playground in central Virginia. Bennett’s Village will honor our bright boy’s spirit and help bring folks of all ages and abilities together.” Learn more at bennettsvillage.org.

1999

Zachary Nowak, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was named director of the Umbra Institute, an American study-abroad program in Perugia, Italy. Nowak, who worked for the institute for eight years, returned after earning his doctorate. He’ll also direct its signature academic concentration, the Program in Food, Sustainability and the Environment. He continues to teach remotely for Harvard’s Extension School. Katherine (Varda) Schwab, Normandy Park, Washington, sends greetings from Seattle. “Working through the pandemic as a physician has given me a new perspective on life. Grace (for myself and others) and gratefulness have gotten me through.”

2000s

2000

Kristopher J. Armstrong, Bexley, Ohio, started a literary journal with his wife, Gretchen. Tomorrow and Tomorrow, a biannual print-only journal, features poetry, prose and visual art, so far including work from three Kenyon writers: Andrew Welsh-Huggins ’83, David B. Guenther ’84 and Kris himself. Kris and Gretchen welcome submissions from Kenyon writers and artists (see tomorrowandtomorrow.net). Otherwise, Kris is parenting four teenagers and working as a master commissioner at the Ohio Supreme Court. He recently got back in touch with Molly (Willow) Vogel, who emailed him after seeing him quoted in the newspaper about his neighbors’ family brass band.

2000

Kelly P. Dillon, Grove City, Ohio, was awarded the Omicron Delta Kappa Honor Society’s Teaching Award at Wittenberg University. The second highest teaching award at Wittenberg, it’s given every year by the student members of ODK to a faculty member embodying scholarship and service to the community. “This award will certainly help my tenure and promotion application, submitted in October,” Kelly writes.

2000

The Rev. Rebecca (White) Newgren, Rockford, Illinois, is senior pastor and main preacher of a federated UCC/PCUSA downtown church “with enough spirit to paint an 80-foot mural on the building and welcome those without homes to spend the winter nights inside,” Becky reports. She cherishes time with her spouse, Andy, and their three children (12, 8 and 5) either on outdoor adventures or in their 1893 Victorian project/home. “After surviving an eighth concussion that took me down for over a year, I am grateful.”

2001

“I’ve been living in Austin for 15 years, and I’m the director of community support programs at the Austin Humane Society. My primary role is working within the community to keep pets out of animal shelters by helping their owners in need. We run pet food pantry events, spay/neuter and microchip clinics, and provide emergency fostering to assist pet owners who may be struggling. Outside of work, I participate in dock diving with my dog, raise a flock of backyard chickens and pretend I know how to garden.”

Sarah M. Hammel, Austin, Texas

2001

Molly A. (McNamara) Meksavan, Clayton, California, with her husband, Frank, and son London (3), welcomed daughter Luna Isabella on May 24, 2021.

2001

Sr. Jeana M. Visel, Ferdinand, Indiana, received a Vital Worship Teacher-Scholar Grant from the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship that allowed her to bring her icon teacher, Marek Czarnecki, as an artist-in-residence to Saint Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology. “When he lectures and works on icons for a school project, students and others can watch the creative process,” she explains. Last fall, she and Marek exhibited some of their icons in the Saint Meinrad Archabbey Library.

2002

Eleanna Anagnos writes, “I have made Mexico City my home city, and I love it here. I am excited to share that some of my work was recently acquired by the Tisch Family Art Collection!” She had a solo exhibition in NYC at High Noon Gallery (Lower East Side) this winter.

2002

Robert W. Sale, Washington, D.C., had an exciting year as a mortgage banking regulator, with home prices soaring and mortgage rates at historic lows. “But it’s been an even more exciting year to be an entrepreneur,” Winston adds. “During lockdown last winter, I taught myself to sew and started making fleece jackets for my miniature dachshunds. This winter I’ll launch Winston’s Western Wiener Wear on Etsy, offering a complete line of cowboy-themed coats and accessories for dachshunds and their owners. With a little luck, I hope to grow my basement business into a wiener dog apparel empire.”

2002

Emily F. (Briggs) Vincent and family relocated to Denver in July after living in Virginia for 10 years. “We’re settling into our new life pretty well,” she reports, “finding that there are a lot of things to rebuild after putting down roots in the D.C. area. Andrew F. Vincent ’03 is enjoying his new job, and I continue anti-racism work.”

2003

“On Sept. 22, I successfully summited Mount Kilimanjaro. Not as hard as running for office, but physically the most challenged I’ve felt since the elevator went out at Caples. Also got the chance to catch up with Stephanie (Todd) Waskoenig and her extremely well-raised daughters during a long layover in Frankfurt.”

Jeff Bridges, Greenwood Village, Colorado

2003

Kyle A. Laux, Richmond, Virginia, and his wife, Emily, are keeping busy, as Edward (7) and Mary Witt (5) “have toe-dipped into summer swimming and a variety of other activities,” he reports. “I have been keeping up with ‘Ted Lasso,’ as I find myself head coach of Mary Witt’s soccer team. I am modeling myself as more of a Ted than a Roy Kent, but as this season progresses I am not so sure about that decision.” A past chair of the Kenyon Fund Executive Committee, Kyle is currently a member of the Capital Campaign Leadership Committee.

2003

Rose N. (Talbert) Meiri, Winnetka, California, updates that after postponing twice, she was finally able to have a safe, vaccinated wedding in October, officiated by Xander CM Piper ’04. “To combat stress leading up to the wedding, I hand-painted 168 Halloween postcards to send to friends and family,” she writes. Rose’s art has been featured in art shows spanning the length of California, and she won a blue ribbon for an avocado painting at the last Los Angeles County Fair. Her favorite things to paint are avocados, other people’s pets and birds wearing hats.

2003

“Last year, I left my job and took a lovely and restorative sabbatical, during which I spent my time reading, writing, meditating and competing on the Peloton leaderboard with Emily E. Martin and Lindsay M. Sabik. In July, I started a new role as head of educational experiences at the tech company Automattic, parent company to WordPress.com. For the time being, this means working from my living room and balcony, but I have big plans to travel and visit my Kenyon friends as soon as possible.”

Ingrid E. Vining, Beverly Hills, California

2003

Virginia (Gauntner) Witte, Cincinnati, and Ann (Weinheimer) Johnson celebrated their 40th birthdays this summer in Pittsburgh at an inadvertently romantic candlelight dinner, Ginna reports. “Nothing like having the power go out citywide when you’re trying to reassure yourself that turning 40 is a good thing and pandemic life is going to get easier any day now.”

2004

“I moved with my husband, Brian C. Cannon ’05, to a little village you may have heard of ... Gambier! We bought a five-acre farm north of campus and are so excited to get involved with the Kenyon community once more. I work at Knox Technical Center in Mount Vernon.”

Katie (Jackson) Cannon

2004

Diana (Torres) Hawken and James R. Hawken recently celebrated 18 years dating — since senior year at Kenyon — and 14 years married. Jamie and Diana live in Naperville, Illinois, with their three kids, Melanie (10), Ryan (9) and Erin (6). “Jamie’s been both busy and happy at Utility Concrete Products,” they share, “while Diana has since become a board member for the Naperville Education Foundation, the 501(c)3 arm of the kids’ school district.” She is a membership co-chair for AAUW-Naperville, a girls and women’s advocacy group, and was recently invited to serve on Naperville’s Human Rights and Fair Housing Commission. To keep her pulse on the Latinx/Hispanic community, she is on the steering committee for Nuestro Futuro through the Chicago Community Trust, the largest affinity fund in the nation dedicated to Latinx philanthropy.

2004

Rabbi Adam S. Lavitt now lives in Providence, Rhode Island, with husband Alex Weissman. “We’re both learning how to be rabbis during a pandemic,” Adam reports. “Turns out there was no class on that in rabbinical school! I serve as rabbi and chaplain at Orchard Cove, a campus of Hebrew SeniorLife made famous by Atul Gawande’s “Being Mortal,” and as a spiritual director for two rabbinical seminaries, along with my growing private practice — all online at this point!”

2004

Harrison David Rivers, St. Paul, Minnesota, spent the fall in London filming Season 1B of the HBO series “The Nevers,” for which he is a story editor. He is also developing a TV series with HBO based on E. Lynn Harris’ novel “Invisible Life.” He continues to work as a playwright, with upcoming productions in San Francisco, Hartford, Philadelphia, Atlanta and St. Paul.

2005

Paul A. Schmid IV, Milton, Massachusetts, gathered with Logan S. Winston and Grace Van Cleave (in spirit) in Nantucket last August for the 40th birthday party of Edward “Teddy” Symes. “In true Kenyon fashion, a portable speaker and a few beverages were all that was needed to have an excellent dance party,” Paul notes.

2005

“Been enjoying Austin, Texas, staying busy as some things get back to normal. Been enjoying helping out with the Philander Chase Conservancy and hope to get more involved as we start to travel again.”

Garrick A. Vance

2005

“My husband and I have four kiddos, ages 2, 4, 10 and 14 now. I’m living out my dream of being around children and actively immersed in creativity, art and teaching as I home-school them. As now-virtual Bible study instructors, too, our volunteer ministry work is keeping us all sane, safe and other-centered.”

Amanda L. (Carpenter) Aita, Corning, New York

2005

“My wife, Suzanne, and I were lucky enough to become moms in 2021. Our son, Zander, is so fun to have around, and he and our dog are getting along very well. I changed accounting positions from The NoMad Hotel to a small woman-owned business called U.S. Chemicals.”

Erin A. Carr, Ridgefield, Connecticut

2005

Nancy (Cass) Moss, Fairfax, Virginia, and husband Colby welcomed a daughter, Quinn Margaret Moss, to the family in May. “She is smiley and very strong-willed,” Nancy reports. “Quinn’s brother Emerson, 3, enjoys ‘gently’ getting her up from her naps by barging into her room, using his stool to turn her light on and announcing, ‘WAKE UP, QUINNIE!’ while trying to stuff her pacifier back into her mouth. I am still providing teletherapy in my private practice from our basement part-time while the kids are in school, spending two days a week wrangling them at home. The excitement of the week was Emerson pointing to Ohio on his new U.S. placemat and announcing, ‘This is where Mama went to school.’”

2005

Elizabeth A. (Palmer) O’Dore, Rose Valley, Pennsylvania, updates, “We moved from Seattle to Philly to be closer to family as we welcomed twin girls in June.” Liz writes that with Margaret (2), Josephine and Susannah can now see grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins on a weekly basis. “Living that suburbs/minivan life now!”

2005

John Pratt, San Diego, now publishes a blog and newsletter for Dr. Senyo Adjibolosoo, founder of the International Institute for Human Factor Development (iihfd.org). “The organization raises funds for the Human Factor Leadership Academy in Ghana,” he notes.

2006

Rachel L. Azaroff moved to Miami in January 2021 after living in Seattle for seven years. “I am in the midst of launching a startup, 312 Society, the marketplace for remote workers to design their lifestyle and build community,” she reports

2006

“Nicholas A. Stalick ’05, Perry (honorary ’06) and I moved to Palo Alto in September, and I began a two-year Wallace Stegner fellowship for fiction at Stanford University. I’m so grateful — and excited to get to know California!”

Yohanca Delgado

2006

Katherine E. Lainhart, Richmond, Virginia, is a garden educator at a public elementary school. “It’s so fun teaching kids about gardening, science and math,” Kate shares. “Matthew R. Schefft ’04 is a pediatric hospitalist at VCU. Our boys are thrilled to be back in person at their elementary school.”

2006

Kathryn (Cameron) McMillan, Chicago, returned to work in May as the retail operations manager for Dearborn Denim & Apparel. “It’s been a hectic but exciting transition for our family,” Katy writes. “We still love living in downtown Chicago, even if our condo is a bit overcrowded with three not-so-little boys and two personable cats.”

2006

John D. Sadoff, Somerville, Massachusetts, continues to run his own chess tutoring business, ChessMate Tutors. “Business has picked up since the release of the Netflix show ‘The Queen’s Gambit,’” Johnny notes.

2007

Susan A. Iskiwitch, Culver City, California, enjoys her career in the Directors Guild of America as an assistant director, most recently working on the AppleTV+ series “The Morning Show.” She frequently visits London while her partner works there.

2007

“Having wanted to join a book club for ages, I finally found one that can be done remotely with like-minded readers — the Kenyon Book Club (see kenyon.pbc.guru). I am teaching online and developing an education organization called Turn Literacy.

Margaret McClintic, Beaufort, South Carolina

2007

Rachel G. (Berkshire) Kibbee and Andrew J. Kibbee announce the birth of their second child, Lorna Mae Kibbee, on May 27, 2021. “Guy, 2, is loving his new role as a big brother!” Rachel reports. The Kibbees bought their first house in New Rochelle, New York, in October 2020. Isaac M. Miller submits: “In 2019, I moved to Lawton, Oklahoma, where I became an English teacher at Lawton High School and married Dr. Emily Finney-Miller. Since the pandemic hit, I’ve been teaching virtually. Meanwhile, my wife and I became foster parents and have had two placements who have affected and changed our lives in many ways. I still dream of the Kokosing.”

2008

Elaine M. Driscoll, Brooklyn, New York, and her husband welcomed daughter Maisie to the family in February 2021. “She has already been lucky enough to meet my former roommates, Anna P. Anderson, Julia K. Wessel and Janet ‘Eliza’ Huberth,” Elaine writes.

2008

“After three years at the Natural Resources Defense Council, I’m leaving to return to federal service in the Biden administration, rejoining the U.S. Department of Transportation as counselor to the deputy secretary. Thanks to all my friends from Kenyon — like Emma J. Delahunty Britz, Sara K. Hunkler and Nida Chaudhary — who helped keep my spirits up during the long interview and hiring process!”

Ann M. Shikany, Washington, D.C.

2009

“I married a famous Croatian architect named Marina Curac, whom I met in Asheville, North Carolina. During the pandemic, we decided to move to Croatia to live with her family on the island of Korcˇula, where I now work in tourism.”

Mark A. Boyd

2009

Megan Connolly, Bayfield, Colorado, spent nearly 10 years in social work but decided to pursue an M.F.A. in creative nonfiction. She enrolled in Queens University of Charlotte’s low-residency M.F.A. program and is working on a memoir in essays.

2009

Jay H. Galbraith, West Roxbury, Massachusetts, and his wife welcomed their second daughter. “Right now, I manage the STEM programming for a network of charter schools and am pursuing my doctorate in education,” he informs.

2009

“After a handful of years at Google, I decided to move back into the creative world as senior creative producer of the Blue Sky Studio at Meow Wolf in Santa Fe, New Mexico. I’m excited about this new chapter and even bought a cute little adobe home here in Santa Fe!”

Maika C. Lindsay

2009

Paige L. Markham moved back to her hometown of Kailua, Hawaii, to manage her practice there full-time. “Aside from being a clinician as a doctor of acupuncture and Chinese medicine,” she reports, “I am currently teaching health-justice liberation workshops to my colleagues, East Asian medicine institutions and corporations. I still have my traditional Chinese facial tool line, Yang Face, as well.”

2009

Jenny L. (Howard) McKee, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, finished her Wake Forest University doctorate on the foraging ecology of Nazca boobies, a seabird in the Galapagos Islands. “I also married the love of my life, Dr. Zachary McKee, in a small family wedding on top of a mountain in North Carolina,” Jenny adds. “We are very excited for this next great adventure!”

2009

Linda T. Pear and Daniel A. Takacs, Cambridge, Massachusetts, welcomed twin boys into the world. “Peter and Ira are super cute and very loved by their big sister, Greta,” Linda reports.

2009

Jerry L. Stewart III earned his M.A. in U.S. history from George Mason University. He teaches ninth and eleventh grade English language arts at Park View High School in Loudoun County, Virginia.

2010s

2010

Kyra E. Mirante, after ten years in New Orleans, opened a pilates and bodywork studio with a dear friend — just four months before the pandemic hit. Now, her partner’s graduate studies in environmental management have taken them to Durham, North Carolina, she updates. “For now, I’m working as an independent contractor while I refine my manual therapy strategies and deepen my understanding of the subtle body. In my loads of friendless free time, I keep myself stimulated with my endless search for the perfect vegan cake recipe.”

2010

“I am very humbled to have passed my veterinary neurology/neurosurgery boards. This has happily relocated my wife, Hannah, and me to Omaha, Nebraska — an absolute jewel of a city.”

Logan M. Donaldson

2010

Arjav R. Ezekiel and his wife, Tracy, a chef, opened a neighborhood restaurant and wine bar in East Austin, Texas, called Birdie’s. “We hope to see all of you here soon!” Saskia E. (Warren) Leeds, Riverdale, Maryland, celebrated two years with the African Wildlife Foundation, she reports. “It’s been one of the few things giving me hope, along with my wonderful partner and friends. Marcia Schwartz ’13 was one of the first people I saw in person after getting vaccinated!”

2010

Saskia E. (Warren) Leeds, Riverdale, Maryland, celebrated two years with the African Wildlife Foundation, she reports. “It’s been one of the few things giving me hope, along with my wonderful partner and friends. Marcia Schwartz ’13 was one of the first people I saw in person after getting vaccinated!”

2010

Elizabeth P. (Anderson) Maloney, Rockville, Maryland, served as the alternate on Rise: A Feminist Book Project for Ages 0-18, part of the Feminist Task Force of the Social Responsibilities Table of the American Library Association. In August, Liz left her job after seven years as a children’s librarian for the D.C. Public Library to accept a position at the National Institutes of Health Patient Library. “The Patient Library is akin to a small public library, but in a hospital setting,” she explains. She continues to enjoy “being a purple-haired cat lady and wife to Seth Maloney.”

2010

Jacob E. Shanley, Tijeras, New Mexico, earned his master of science in applied mathematics from UNM in 2019, started a software business last April, and had a baby boy in May. “I still swim regularly,” he informs.

2010

I’m still in D.C. and recently started teaching math at E.L. Haynes Public Charter High School. My band, in which I play keys — the Blue Dot Jazz Troupe — is still performing regularly in the area. Check out the schedule if you’re in town (bluedotjazztroupe.com).

2010

Samantha M. Turner, Gambier, Ohio, became Kenyon’s assistant director of academic ceremonies and events on Oct. 1. “While I have loved the last four years in the international office,” Sam writes, “I am really excited to get back to large-scale event management.”

2010

Natalie E. West reports that in September her job with the World Food Programme took her to Madagascar. “I’m continuing to work on nutrition analyses and projects to prevent malnutrition,” she reports. “It’s a big change from West Africa, and outside of work I’m looking forward to doing some hiking, spotting some lemurs and learning to speak some Malagasy!”

2011

Sasha Pauline Fanny-Holston returned to the Hill in August as assistant director of diversity, equity and inclusion. “So far it’s been going really well,” she reports. “I oversee Snowden, KEEP and REACH, along with other ODEI-related activities. After dealing with a lot of loss and disillusionment this year, I realized that life is too short to be miserable and in a miserable job, so I left Big Law and Boston behind.”

2011

“It is my honor and privilege to announce that my mama’s dream of having a nice Jewish doctor in the family has come true! This summer, I graduated from Michigan State with my doctorate in curriculum, instruction and teacher education. Still figuring out next steps.”

Hannah F. Grisham, East Lansing, Michigan

2011

Mary Margaret (Fletcher) Groberg, Montpelier, Vermont, and husband Dan welcomed second daughter Anna Ruth Groberg on July 1. “Big sister Molly is smitten, as are we,” she reports. “We enjoyed fall visits from classmates Ashley G. Gray and Anna C. Childs. I recently discovered a purple nail polish color called ‘Lords & Ladies.’ I can only assume a Kenyon grad is behind it and would love to know the story!”

2011

Laura T. Miller, Columbus, Ohio, in her second year as a school psychologist after completing her Ohio State doctorate in 2020, and Kyle B. Whitman ’10 had a baby girl. “Kirby Whitman-Miller was born in May 2021, and we are loving our parenting journey so far!” Laura writes. “This spring, I’m hoping to celebrate five years cancer-free.”

2011

“Come glamp with me near Zion National Park! I can teach you how to handle rattlesnakes and tarantulas with poise and grace.

Margaret J. Wardrop, Tarrytown, New York

2012

Garrett S. Fields and Arielle A. (Ismail) Fields, with son Philip (2), left their one-bedroom apartment in Brooklyn last summer for State College, Pennsylvania, Garrett informs. “Ari is pursuing a doctorate in art history at Penn State. I started a clerkship with a federal judge on the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. Philip is enjoying day care and all the extra space. He loves cruising around town and watching all the PSU undergrads, particularly on game days.”

2012

Rebecca A. Kobayashi is an editor for the communications office of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. “Late last year, I returned to the U.S. from Japan, where I had worked as an editor and Japanese-to-English translator at a Tokyo corporate communications company for over five years,” Becca updates.

2012

Amelia D. McClure, Indianapolis, and her husband, Mark, welcomed Charlotte Wren Dunbar on Aug. 14, 2021. “She arrived three weeks early,” Amelia writes, “only one week after her baby shower with Ciara C. Sanchez, Leanna D. (Burckley) Watt, Ian M. Watt ’13, Cameron W. Ash ’13 and other wonderful Kenyon friends from afar. We are loving watching her bloom into her world.” Amelia is assistant director of government relations and compliance at Indiana University. “Mark and I live in a community on the grounds of an old insane asylum in downtown Indianapolis.”

2012

Ryan I. Motevalli-Oliner, Columbus, Ohio, and his wife, Brittany L. Thielke, welcomed their son, Emmett, in September. “This was happening as I was concluding my job at Ohio Wesleyan in anticipation of starting my new job in Kenyon’s admission office in mid-October,” Ryan notes.

2012

Tatenda Uta, Brandon, Florida, started a new job in 2021 and in March became a U.S. citizen, he updates. “You would think becoming a U.S. citizen was the best part of the year, but in May my wife and I had our first child, Rudo Grace-Lee Uta. Rudo means love in Shona (mother tongue).”

2013

Andrew B. Gipson, Ithaca, New York, earned his Cornell doctorate in August and now works for the USDA on plant proteins that help crops survive in poor soil conditions.

2013

Liliana E. Martinez relocated to London in February to take up a new role with her company, covering the Europe region. “It has been an interesting challenge to start a new life in a new city during a pandemic and lockdown,” Lili writes. “On the side, I have been singing in a classical music choir and keeping my Arabic studies up to date, as well as running along the Thames whenever I get a chance. Aaron L.S. Lynn ’14 also recently moved to London, and we have been able to hang out a few times.”

2014

Brandylyn L. Arredondo, Tampa, Florida, completed her master’s, “an experience she never wants to live through again,” she notes. She continues as a part-time qualitative cancer researcher while job-seeking. Over the summer, Brandy became a wilderness researcher, spending seven weeks living in the Yosemite Wilderness — a much needed time of solitude, she informs.

2014

“Going into year two of blissful living with Lucy A. Phillips in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn. Come visit!”

Kelsey A. Kiser

2014

Aaron L. S. Lynn, moved to London, where on weekends he enjoys his favorite French cafe around the corner from his home, along with many beautiful parks.

2014

“Norway has finally opened — we have enough people vaccinated! I’m still working for the Norwegian Labour and Welfare organization, still a union rep. We have negotiations for everyone’s salaries these days. I’m learning a lot and realized I am underpaid. Got to change that. In other news, I finally finished my master’s in philosophy. And I’ve been trying solo hiking/camping. Absolutely love it — even though the sound of the tent in the wind makes me paranoid. Still haven’t met a bear or a wolf, so all good so far!”

Kristina Miklavic

2014

Elisabeth L. Thoreson-Green moved to Recife, Brazil, to start her first Foreign Service assignment at the U.S. Consulate there.

2015

Edgar F. Arceo, Monrovia, California, updates, “Since August, I have been living the lavish middle school teacher life in Pasadena. My 10-year old students are often really immature, but they are pure joy; I love ’em. And the sunny weather and people in SoCal are worth the obnoxious taxes.” Edgar attended the wedding of Alistair I. Flynn ’14 along with Andrew L. Parmelee ’14, Lewis C. Williams-Gray ’14 and Daniel P. Toulson ’12. “I even got to see the great man, Samuel A. Justice, in Boston for a night of ice cream and poetry. I recently moved in with my partner, and we’re freshly navigating how to coexist in 600 square feet of space with a fully grown labradoodle.”

2015

Laura E. Boniface moved to New York to begin work as a lawyer. “If you see me walking too slowly, please be nice — been in the Midwest for a while.”

2015

Matthew T. Eley, Roanoke, Virginia, was briefly the editor of a small-town newspaper and has gotten engaged. He met up with Henri K. Gendreau ’16 for pints and yearns for the day when Kenyon takes its place among the world’s great driving campuses, adding cryptically, “I am secretly older than P.F. Kluge.”

2015

Colin D. Finnegan continues to live in Washington, D.C., with Catharine E. Straley ’17 and recently began his M.B.A. candidacy at NYU Stern.

2015

Anna C. Gaglione, Cincinnati, a 3L at University of Cincinnati’s College of Law, will graduate in May. During law school Claire worked as a fellow at the Ohio Innocence Project, advocating for wrongfully convicted Ohio prisoners. Currently, she works with UC’s Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order Clinic. “Hope to continue advocating for survivors of intimate partner violence throughout my legal career.”

2015

Rachel J. Hall, back in Venice, California, finished working on a huge global (virtual) fan event. Check out Tudum: A Netflix Global Fan Event on YouTube.

2015

“I got my doctorate in April, with a focus on eating disorders in athletes, and in May gave birth to our daughter, Felicity! Being a mom (or mum, here) is amazing‚ as cliche as it sounds! Now figuring out how to balance work and family life in a whole new way.

Hannah F. L. (Cooper) Stoyel, London, England

2016

Cassandra W. Brumback married Eugene F. Milbourn III ’13 in a family-only wedding last year, and they hope to celebrate with Kenyon friends soon. Casey also finished law school and started working at Venable LLP.

2016

Christopher Kei Helm received his M.A. in public policy at Georgetown University. He is now a Presidential Management Fellow at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight.

2016

“Eamon H. Levesque and I recently expanded our thriving Vermont-based chain of bed and breakfasts by opening a location in Bar Harbor, Maine.”

Milad Momeni

2016

“Back in person for my final year of law school here in NYC. After graduation I will be clerking on the Supreme Court of New Jersey.”

Stewart R. Pollock

2016

Sruthi P. Rao married Jae June J. Lee ’17 at the Chicago Botanic Garden in May. “There was a solid Kenyon contingent at the wedding — one that had been postponed due to COVID but ended up being beautiful and unforgettable,” Sruthi shares. The newlyweds moved from D.C. to New York City so Sruthi could start her first year at NYU’s law school.

2017

Gianna S. (Biaggi) Anderson and Oscar L. Anderson received a production deal to create an Italian cartoon version of Stuart Little, featuring Stuart’s adventures navigating Berlusconi’s blocked parliament.

2017

Samuel P. Clougher started at the University of Michigan Law School. “Today was still the best day of my life!” he sums up.

2017

Pankti V. Dalal entered her fifth year teaching math at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire. She also advises the Indian/Hindu Society, is a dorm head, coaches and is the co-facilitator of the newly formed Faculty DEI Council. Recently she has been taking a deep dive into equity stances in the mathematics classroom and developing culturally responsive teaching practices. She also may or may not get a cat in the next year.

2017

Benjamin F. Grannis penned from Boulder, Colorado, last fall: “As I write this, I’m nearly one-third done with my 10,000-mile bike trip to raise awareness of distracted driving. As I travel around the United States, I’m fundraising for TextLess Live More.” Check out Ben’s route at EyesUpRide.com.

2017

Kyra A.T. Green, Brunswick, Maine, writes, “I’m in my fifth academic cycle at Bowdoin College. After holding roles in both admissions and the Center for Multicultural Life, I have fully transitioned into my current role as interim director” of the latter.

2017

“I’ve been remotely working for U.S. News & World Report for more than a year now, focusing on self-care as well, mainly through personal fitness. Sadly, the mac ‘n’ cheese wedges — and, I hear, the Cove itself — are gone, but on the bright side, so are about 70 pounds of my weight. I got a raise and I’m happy where I am, at least for now.”

Benjamin E. Koses, Springfield, Virginia

2017

Caitelin F.K. McCoy, Bronx, New York, is now a successful NYC real estate agent who has loved being able to help some of her classmates find homes.

2017

“The more things change — I started my M.F.A. in theater management and producing at Columbia University School of the Arts — the more they stay the same: still living with Amy R. Schatz and Julia M. Waldow.”

Victoria Ungvarsky, New York City

2017

Jennifer L. Wendler is in her second year of grad school at American University. “Most of my time is spent writing or thinking about my thesis, which I presented at the annual American University/George Washington University Symposium for Art History in late October,” Jenna writes. “When not having a quarter-life crisis about post-grad employment (round two), I run local trails, read books and explore D.C.’s many museums.”

2017

Sadiq Jiwa, now a professional golfer, made his debut on the Mackenzie Tour (PGA of Canada) in September, he informs. “I’m slowly learning the ins and outs of life on the road as a tour professional.” In October, Sadiq moved to Phoenix to play pro events on the Outlaw Tour. In 2022, “I’ll be trying to qualify for the PGA Tour of Latin America, the Mackenzie Tour and some individual tournaments. I haven’t had the start I hoped for, but I’m learning a ton. This experience has made me really appreciate the Kenyon golf team’s indoor performance lab.”

2018

“I’m glad to be back in person at Portland (Oregon) Public Schools as a bilingual speech therapist. After realizing many pre-professional programs don’t foster meaningful collaborations to challenge our biases, stereotypes and generalizations, I co-founded a professional learning community, where colleagues learn about specific topics and solve concerns collectively.”

Meridith K. Heckler

2018

Elinor P. Horn and John McFarlane biked part of the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route from Breckenridge, Colorado, to Santa Fe, New Mexico, last summer. “A few weeks of steep mountain climbs, brisk early mornings and inspiring landscapes that will last a lifetime,” Ellie recounts. “The people we met along the way were what made this trip absolute magic. From hitchhiking to going off our scheduled route, the universe always had our back. I already miss the way the aspen trees whistled in the wind.”

2018

Natalie S. Kane spent her summer and fall in Gloucester, Massachusetts, with the Gloucester Stage Company. “It’s been wonderful to return to live theater by assistant directing five very different plays and meeting so many new artists,” she reports.

2018

Ryan P. Muthiora has been living in Winter Park, Florida since Sept. 10, playing golf professionally and doing freelance graphic design and illustration

2018

Paige N. (Ballard) Nelson and Sterling A. Nelson ’16 were married after a year’s delay at a beautiful vineyard in Minnesota, she updates. “We currently live in Columbus.”

2018

Eliana Troper, Washington, D.C., submitted her first paper for review. “It focuses on hiding covert messages in emails sent in a fashion that looks human, as determined by AI, in order to subvert censorship.” Eliana works on a DARPA project called Reliable Anonymous Communication for Everyone. “Basically I get to use a combination of AI, networking, steganography and cryptography to do some seriously cool science.” Meanwhile, “I am suing D.C. for their actions on June 1, 2020. I and others were kettled; a resident opened his door and allowed us to escape the brutal police crackdown, which occurred after many of us fled the now-infamous Lafayette Square clearing for then-President Trump’s upside-down Bible photo op.”

2018

Hannah E. Weingold updates, “I’ve been exploring my new city of Chicago for the last year and have really enjoyed the change of pace, though the winters will take some getting used to.” Hannah still works at J.P. Morgan’s downtown office, but on a new team. James K. Wojtal, Philadelphia, started at Villanova University, working toward a master’s in English.

2019

Marylou E. “Molly” Cox, Washington, D.C., recently reconnected with Kate Prince ’17 to reminisce about rugby team days, Molly reports. “I love living in my D.C. neighborhood and making frequent trips to my local farmers market. For work, I run the operations for an art auction house. In my free time, I can be found searching for jobs in foreign affairs, singing Lizzo and listening to Arabic music on the Metro.”

2019

Caroline G. Daugherty is pursuing a master’s in business analytics at MIT. “I live with Keely S. Lovato ’20 in Boston, and we love running together all around the city!”

2019

Emma H. Garschagen has been working since fall 2019 as a professional sailor. “As the first mate and boat captain for 59 North Sailing,” Emma explains, “I lead our crew on offshore sailing adventures and am responsible for the safe operation and upkeep of the ship. We sail a 1991 Swan 59 called ICEBEAR, on which I have logged over 15,000 ocean miles since 2019. In 2022, I will make my second Atlantic crossing, then sailing far north to the Arctic. When not sailing, I live on the dry land of Boulder, Colorado, and work as 59 North Sailing’s creative director.” Listen to the podcast at 59-north.com/podcast.

2019

Claire E. Oleson, Grand Rapids, Michigan, signed with a literary agent at Janklow & Nesbit to represent her hoped-for debut novel, centered on queerness and rural space.

2019

“I am excited to use my Kenyon English degree to craft proposals asking our donors to invest in our lands, waters and climate. I am also a council member and event coordinator for the Columbus Young Professionals Club, which reaches over 30,000 young professionals to provide leadership development, share community and culture news, and spark important conversations. I also volunteer with Columbus Humane as a dog handler for our volunteer photographers.”

Charlotte N. Smithson, Columbus, Ohio

2019

Madeline E. Westover began graduate school at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth as a member of the Class of 2023.

2020s

2020

“I’m excited to be back at Kenyon working as an admissions counselor! Being back on campus and walking Middle Path (particularly in autumn) is a dream come true. I look forward to connecting with students from Connecticut, Rhode Island and New York throughout the year!””

Julia G. Adamo

2020

Sarah K. Campbell moved to Canterbury, England, in September to start a master’s degree in autism studies at the University of Kent. Anna C. Deryck is in her first year of veterinary school at Iowa State University, hoping to graduate in 2025.

2020

Morgan L. Engmann married Ryan Cooper in July with a small group of family and friends. “It was the most perfect day we could have asked for,” she writes. “I’m continuing my education at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, and Ryan has started his career in the Navy.”

2020

Nathan K. Gordon spent last year teaching English to elementary school students in an Arabic-speaking school in Haifa, Israel. “During the year, I decided I want to stay in Israel, at least for the near future,” Nate reports. “I became a citizen in July and am currently in the process of drafting into the Israeli army, where I will serve for the next two years.”

2020

Kylie G. Milliken moved to Scotland to begin a master’s degree in public policy at the University of Edinburgh. “The architecture here reminds me a lot of Kenyon,” Kylie notes, “and I’ve been lucky enough to meet students from all over the world.”

2020

Nina J. Samaan started studying at the Atlantic Acting School Conservatory in New York City.

2020

Catherine A. Smith led backpacking trips in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks last summer for six weeks. “It was an amazing experience and I miss it dearly!” Cat informs. “Now I’m living in Ohio again, working virtually as part of the team for a nonprofit awareness campaign called TextLess Live More. We’re dedicated to ending distracted driving and promoting digital wellness.”

2020

Anne C. Townsend is in Brooklyn, New York, participating in a nine-month nonprofit documentary film program at UnionDocs, and working part-time at WhiteBox, a nonprofit art space.

2020

Camila M. Wise lives in Bucaramanga, Colombia, teaching English at Universidad Industrial de Santander on her yearlong Fulbright Teaching Fellowship.

2021

Charles W. Scarborough Jr. joined Teach for America. “In my first year at United Schools Network in Columbus, Ohio, I teach second grade ELA,” Charlie updates.

2021

Elizabeth W. Stanley, Philadelphia, is a program associate for student outreach at the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a nonpartisan nonprofit that defends First Amendment rights for students and faculty on college and university campuses.

Also In This Edition